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Full text of "University of Southern Mississippi Bulletin, 1980-1981"

he University 
of Southern 
lississi 



Bulletin 1980-81 




ACCREDITED BY: 

SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF MUSIC 

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR ACCREDITATION OF 
TEACHER EDUCATION 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES FOR TEACHER 
EDUCATION 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR NURSING 

COUNCIL ON MEDICAL EDUCATION OF THE AMERICAN 
MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

AMERICAN SPEECH AND HEARING ASSOCIATION 

AMERICAN BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY 

COUNCIL ON SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION 

AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 

AMERICAN NURSES' ASSOCIATION 

AMERICAN ASSEMBLY OF COLLEGIATE 
SCHOOLS OF BUSINESS 

ENGINEERS' COUNCIL FOR PROFESSIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT— ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 

AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION 

MEMBER OF: 

AMERICAN COUNCIL ON EDUCATION 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF STATE COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES 

ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN COLLEGES 

NATIONAL COMMISSION ON ACCREDITING 

COUNCIL OF GRADUATE SCHOOLS 
IN THE UNITED STATES 

MISSISSIPPI ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY PRESSES 

AMERICAN COUNCIL OF LEARNED SOCIETIES 

The University of Southern Mississippi offers equal educational and employment 
opportunities to all persons without regard to sex, race, religion, color, or national 
origin. These provisions also apply to handicapped individuals pursuant to current 
federal and state regulations subject to reasonable standards of admission and 
employment. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI 

BULLETIN 




;%/rg, M^ S v 



GENERAL CATALOG ISSUE 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1980-1981 



FALL SEMESTER OPENS AUGUST 24, 1980 

University of Southern Mississippi Bulletin USPS-652-260 

Published quarterly by the University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, 

Mississippi. Entered as second-class matter February 19, 1917, at the 

post office at Hattiesburg, Mississippi, under Act of August 24, 1912. 



VOLUME 67 



(Published December 1, 1979) 



NUMBER 2 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 

CALENDAR: 1980-81 v 

GENERAL UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION 

Board of Trustees 9 

Administrative Officers 10 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Historical Sketch 13 

General Admission Requirements 15 

Student Community 22 

Student Expenses 29 

Student Aid 34 

Libraries 44 

English Language Institute 45 

ACADEMIC ORGANIZATION AND REQUIREMENTS 

Organization for Instruction 47 

General Academic Regulations 50 

General Degree Requirements 54 

COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, AND DIVISIONS 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 59 

School of Professional Accountancy 62 

Economics 64 

Finance and General Business 65 

Management 66 

Marketing 67 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 71 

Teacher Education Programs 72 

Special School Services 74 

Adult Education 78 

Business Education 78 

Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education 81 

Curriculum and Instruction 82 

Educational Administration and Supervision 86 

Industrial and Vocational Education 86 

Psychology ._ 89 

Research and Foundations 91 

Science Education 91 

Special Education 91 

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 93 

Allied Arts 94 

Art 94 

Music 97 

Theatre Arts 105 

SCHOOL OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

AND RECREATION 109 

Athletic Administration and Coaching 110 

Health and Safety Education 114 

Recreation 115 

Intramural Sports 116 

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 120 

Environmental Design 123 

Clothing and Textile 123 

Clothing Merchandising 1 24 

Interior Design 1 25 

Family Life Services 125 

Child Development 1 26 

Housing and Home Mangement 127 

Marriage and Family Life 128 

Institution Administration 129 

Home Economics Education 133 



III 



HONORS COLLEGE 134 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 137 

Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) 141 

Communication 142 

Criminal Justice 144 

English 145 

Linguistics 149 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages 150 

Foreign Languages 152 

Geography and Area Development 156 

Community and Regional Planning 158 

Economics Program 159 

History 160 

American Studies 163 

Latin American Studies 164 

Social Studies Program 165 

Journalism 166 

Advertising 169 

Military Science 1 70 

Philosophy and Religion 172 

Political Science 1 74 

Paralegal Studies 1 76 

Pre-Law 177 

Radio, Television, and Film 178 

Sociology and Anthropology 182 

Asian Studies 187 

Speech and Hearing Sciences 187 

Speech Communication 191 

SCHOOL OF LIBRARY SERVICE 195 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 199 

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 202 

Institute of Genetics 204 

Mississippi Polymer Institute 205 

Health Related Sciences 205 

Pre-Professional Curricula 206 

Biology 211 

Chemistry 213 

Computer Science and Statistics 214 

Construction and Architectural Technology 217 

Geology 219 

Industrial Technology 220 

Mathematics 225 

Medical Technology 226 

Microbiology 228 

Food Science and Technology 228 

Physics and Astronomy 229 

Polymer Science 230 

Science Education 232 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI-GULF COAST 236 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI-NATCHEZ 240 

DIVISION OF EXTENSION AND PUBLIC SERVICE 243 

Independent Study 243 

Conferences and Workshops 243 

Community Services 244 

Professional Development 244 

University of Southern Mississippi-Jackson 245 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (in alphabetical order) 246 

FACULTY 341 

INDEX 379 



IV 



Tuesday, May 13 
Monday, June 2 



CALENDAR 
SUMMER TERM 1980 

Deadline for making application for admission 



Registration by appointment 
Orientation for freshmen and transfer students 
Only day to register for full or first term 
courses without late fee. 



Tuesday, June 3 
00 a.m. Classes begin 



30 p.m. Late registration begins 

30-8:00 p.m. Tuesday night classes meet (this week only) 

30-10:00 p.m. Thursday night classes meet (this week only) 



Wednesday, June 4 

6:30-8:00 p.m. Monday night classes meet (this week only) 

8:30-10:00 p.m. Wednesday night classes meet (this week only) 

Thursday, June 5 

6:30-10:00 Thursday night classes meet as scheduled 

Friday, June 6 

Last day for registering or adding first term courses 

Wednesday, June 1 1 

Last day for registering or adding full term courses 
Last day for dropping first term courses 

Monday, June 30 

Last day for dropping full term courses without 
academic penalty 

Thursday, July 3 

End of first term (q) courses 

Friday, July 4 

Independence Day Holiday 

Monday, July 7 

Second term (qq) courses begin 

Registration for second term (qq) courses begin 

Wednesday, July 9 

Last day for registering or adding second term courses 

Monday, July 14 

Last day for dropping second term courses 

Friday, August 8 

Last day of regularly scheduled classes 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, August 1 1-14 
Summer term examinations 

Thursday, August 14 

7:30 p.m. Commencement 



FALL SEMESTER 1980 

Hattiesburg Campus 

Friday, August 8, 1980 

Deadline for making application for admission 

Saturday, August 23 

Dormitories open for students with definite 
room assignments 

Sunday, August 24 

8:00 a.m. Dormitories open for all other students 

1 :00 p.m. Registration by appointment (Mini-Quarter students) 

Monday, August 25 

8:00 a.m. Registration continues 

8:00-10:00 a.m. Orientation for freshmen and transfer students 

who did not attend summer orientation 
10:00-1 1 :55 a.m. Placement tests for new students 

Tuesday, August 26 

8:00 a.m. Registration continues 

Wednesday, August 27 

8:00 a.m. Classes begin 

1:30 p.m. Late registration begins 

6:30-7:45 p.m. Monday night classes meet (this week only) 

8:00-9: 15 p.m. Wednesday night classes meet (this week only) 

Thursday, August 28 

8:15 a.m. Change of schedule begins 

6:30-7:45 p.m. Tuesday night classes meet (this week only) 

8:00-9:15 p.m. Thursday night classes meet (this week only) 

Monday, September 1 

Labor Day Holiday (night classes will meet) 

Friday, September 5 

Last day for registering or adding courses 

Thursday, October 2 

Last day for dropping a course without academic penalty 

Friday, October 17 

Midpoint in Fall Semester 
End of first term (q) courses 

Monday, October 20 

Second term (qq) courses begin 

Tuesday, November 25 

9: 1 5 p.m. Thanksgiving holidays begin (night classes will meet) 

Monday, December 1 

8:00 a.m. Classes resume 

Monday, December 8 

Last day of regularly scheduled classes 

Tuesday-Saturday, December 9-13 

Fall Semester examinations 

Friday, January 16, 1981 

Last day to file application for undergraduate 
and graduate degrees. 



VI 






SPRING SEMESTER 1981 

Hattiesburg Campus 

Friday, December 19, 1980 

Deadline for making application for admission 

Wednesday, January 7, 1981 

Dormitories open 

Thursday, January 8 

8:00 a.m. Registration by appointment 

Friday, January 9 

8:00 a.m. Registration continues 

Monday, January 12 

8:00 a.m. Classes begin 

1 :30 p.m. Late registration begins 

6:30-9: 1 5 p.m. Night classes begin meeting at regularly scheduled times 

Friday, January 16 

Last day to file application for undergraduate and 
graduate degrees for May graduation 

Tuesday, January 20 

Last day to register or add courses 

Monday, February 16 

Last day to drop a course without academic penalty 

Friday, March 6 

6:00 p.m. Spring vacation begins 

Midpoint in Spring Semester 

End of first term (q) courses 

Monday, March 16 

8:00 a.m. Classes resume 

Second term (qq) courses begin 

Monday, March 30 

USM Day 

Thursday, April 16 

Easter holidays begin (night classes will meet) 

Monday, April 20 

6:30 p.m. Monday night classes meet 

Tuesday, April 21 

8:00 a.m. Day classes resume 

Wednesday, April 29 

Last day of regularly scheduled classes 
Last day to file application for undergraduate and 
graduate degrees for August graduation 

Thursday, April 30 

Reading Day 

Friday, Saturday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, May 1 , 2, 4-6 
Spring Semester examinations 

Wednesday, May 6 

7:30 p.m. Commencement 



VII 



Tuesday, May 12 



SUMMER TERM 1981 

Deadline for making application for admission 



Monday, June 1 

8:00 a.m. Registration by appointment 

Orientation for freshmen and transfer students 
Only day to register for full or first term 
courses without late fee 

Tuesday, June 2 

8:00 a.m. Classes begin 

1:30 p.m. Late registration begins 

6:30-8:00 p.m. Tuesday night classes meet (this week only) 

8:30-10:00 p.m. Thursday night classes meet (this week only) 

Wednesday, June 3 

6:30-8:00 p.m. Monday night classes meet (this week only) 

8:30-10:00 p.m. Wednesday night classes meet (this week only) 

Thursday, June 4 

6:30-10:00 p.m. Thursday night classes meet as scheduled 

Friday, June 5 

Last day for registering or adding first term (q) courses 

Wednesday, June 10 

Last day for registering or adding full term courses 
Last day for dropping first term (q) courses 

Monday, June 29 

Last day for dropping full term courses without 
academic penalty 

Friday, July 3 

End of first term (q) courses 

Monday, July 6 

Second term (qq) courses begin 

Registration for second term (qq) courses begins 

Wednesday, July 8 

Last day for registering or adding second term (qq) courses 

Monday, July 13 

Last day for dropping second term (qq) courses 

Friday, August 7 

Last day of regularly scheduled classes 

Monday-Thursday, August 10-13 

Summer term examinations 

Thursday, August 13 

7:30 p.m. Commencement 



VIII 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Of State Institutions of Higher Learning, State of Mississippi 

Members Whose Terms Expire May 7, 1 988 
CHARLES C. JACOBS, JR., Third Congressional District, Cleveland 

MS. BETTY A. WILLIAMS, Northern Supreme Court District, Columbus 
DR. JOHN R. LOVELACE, Second Congressional District, Batesville 

NEAL DENTON ROGER, JR., Fourth Congressional District, Pontotoc 

Members Whose Terms Expire May 7, 1 984 

BOBBY L. CHAIN, Sixth Congressional District, Hattiesburg 
DR. ROBERT WALKER HARRISON, Central Supreme Court District, 

Yazoo City 

TRAVIS E. PARKER, State-at-Large, Drew 

MRS. MIRIAM QUINN SIMMONS, Southern Supreme Court District, 

Columbia 

Members Whose Terms Expire May 7, 1980 

DR. VERNER S. HOLMES, Seventh Congressional District, McComb 

BOSWELL STEVENS, First Congressional District, Macon 

TOMMY MUNRO, State-at-Large, Biloxi 

W. M. SHOEMAKER, Fifth Congressional District, Meridian 

MRS. ROBERT L. SHEMWELL, La Bauve Trustee, Hernando 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

BOBBY L. CHAIN, Chairman 

MRS. MIRIAM Q. SIMMONS, Vice Chairman 

DR. E. E. THRASH, Executive Secretary and Director 



10/Administration 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

AUBREY KEITH LUCAS, B.S., M.A., Ph.D President 

ROGER BARTON JOHNSON, B.S., M.S Executive Administrative 

Assistant to the President 

SIDNEY E. L. WEATHERFORD, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Director of 

Institutional Research 



OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT 
FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

CHARLES WICKLIFFE MOORMAN, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Vice President 

ERIC RICHARD PRENSHAW, B.M., M.M., D.M.A Assistant to the 

Vice President 

NICHOLAS HUGH FRUGE', B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D Assistant to the 

Vice President 

ROBERT THOMAS van ALLER, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the 

Graduate School 

JOSEPH ARTHUR GREENE, JR., A.B., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the 

College of Business 
Administration 

BOBBY DEAN ANDERSON, B.S.E., M.Ed., Ed.D Dean of the 

College of Education 
and Psychology 

JOHN ELWYN GREEN, B.M., M.Mus., Ed.D Dean of the 

College of Fine Arts 

JAMES HYLBERT SIMS, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the 

College of Liberal Arts 

GARY CECIL WILDMAN, A.B., Ph.D Dean of the 

College of Science 
and Technology 

WALTER ELMORE COOPER, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Dean of the School 

of Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation 

SARAH LITTLETON WEAVER GIBBS, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the 

School of Home Economics 
ELIZABETH CATHERINE HARKINS, B.S.N. , M.S.N. , Adv. M. Ed., Ph.D. 

Dean of the School of Nursing 

SHIRLEY JOAN JONES, B.A., M.A., M.S.W., D.S.W Dean of the 

School of Social Work 

ONVA K. BOSHEARS, A.B., M.S., Ph.D Dean of the School 

of Library Service 

WALLACE GRANT KAY, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the Honors 

College 

GENE DUANE SAUCIER, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Dean of Admissions and 

Special Academic Services 

BILLIE PARROTT ALLEN, B.S., M.B.A Director of High School 

and Junior College Relations 

MARY EDITH DRESSEL, B.A., M.Ed Director of Career Advisement 

and Cooperative Education 

ALICE LUCY MAW, B.S., M.S Director of 

International Students Advisement 



Administration/ 1 1 

DANNY WAYNE MONTGOMERY, B.S., M.Ed Registrar 

CHARLES B. McNEILL, B.S., M.S Director of 

Admissions 

RICHARD TAYLOR DODDER, B.S. in B.A Director of the 

English Language Institute 



OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR 

ADMINISTRATION AND REGIONAL CAMPUSES 

SHELBY FRELAND THAMES, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice President 

CLYDE NEULAN GINN, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D Dean of Division 

Continuing Education and Public Service 

JOE EARL HOLLOWAY, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D Dean, USM-Gulf Park 

BILL WES GORE, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Dean, USM-Natchez 

POWELL G. OGLETREE, B.S., M.A Director of Alumni Activities 

WILLIAM CLARENCE SCRUGGS, JR., B.S Director of the 

Computing Center 

WILLIAM ELLIS KIRKPATRICK, B.S., M.S Director of 

Public Relations 

WILLIAM GREGORY BRUNDAGE, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Director of 

Research and Sponsored 
Programs 



OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR 
BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

THOMAS GLENVALL ESTES, JR., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., C.P.A Vice 

President 

ALBERT JOSEPH JAEGER, B.B.A., M.S Assistant Vice President 

for Business and Finance 

HOWARD GENE HENDERSON, B.S Director of Physical Plant 

BETTY GILLIS COOLEY, B.S Bursar 

KENNETH ELMO SMITH, B.B.A., M.S., C. P. A.. Director of Accounting Operations 

JOAN P. GLOVER, B.S Manager of University Bookstore 

JESSIE BOYD Director of University Commons 

ROBERT HERRINGTON, JR., B.S., M.Ed Director of Personnel Services 

CECIL MARSHALL KLUTTS, B.S., C.P.M Director of Purchasing 

JAMES C. BISHOP, B.S., M.S Director of Communication Services 

JAMES RAY CARPENTER, B.A., M.A Director of the University Golf Course 

THOMAS S. BATEMAN, B.S Director of Administrative Services 

RONALD W. LOTT, B.S., C.P.A Internal Auditor 



OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS 

PETER EASTON DURKEE, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Vice President 

JOSEPH SCOTT PAUL, B.S., M.S Assistant to the 

Vice President 

WILLIAM RADER GRANTHAM, B.S., M.A Dean of Students 

WILLIE VERNON OUBRE, B.S Director of Campus Security 

WARREN DUNN, B.S., M.S Director of University Union 

and Student Activities 



12/Administration 

BILL WAYNE SHAFER, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D Director of 

University Counseling Center 

CHARLES H. PROBST, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Dean of Student Services 

WILLIAM G. FRON, B.S., M.S Director of Financial Aid 

ROBERT DOUGLAS LANDRUM, B.S Director of Special Services 

CARL CONN LAWRENCE, B.S Director of Placement Services 

ROBERT S. KIVETZ, B.A., M.S Director of Housing 

Administration 

ALINE R. EDDINS Acting Director of the Office of 

Veterans Affairs 

BOYD ALEXANDER KELLETT, M.D Director of Student Health 

Services 



INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

RONALD HALL DALE, B.S., M.S Athletic Director 

CELESTAIN JOSEPH PETER TAYLOR, B.S., M.S Assistant Athletic 

Director and Head Baseball Coach 

THURMON L. COLLINS, JR., B.S Head Football Coach 

MALCOLM K. TURK, B.S., M.S Men's Basketball Coach 

DIANA KAY JAMES, B.S., M.S Women's Basketball Coach 

ROBERT HAYS CLEVELAND, B.S Sports Information Director 



Admission Requirements/ 15 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES 

ALL COMMUNICATIONS regarding entrance to the undergraduate colleges and 
schools of the University should be addressed to the Director of Admissions, University of 
Southern Mississippi, Southern Station, Box 501 1 , Hattiesburg, Miss. 39401 . 

Eligibility for admission cannot be determined until the application, ACT score, and 
scholastic records have been submitted. These items should be received before the deadline 
date of the semester for which the student is applying (see Calendar). The academic record, 
character, and conditions of application of the applicant must be in accordance with the 
rules and regulations of the Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning and 
with the laws of the State of Mississippi. The applicant must have excellent moral character 
and must be willing to conduct his or her affairs so as to be a credit to the University. The 
University reserves the right to cancel the admission or registration of an individual whose 
attendance at the University, in the opinion of the appropriate administrative officer and 
the President, would not be mutually beneficial to himself and to the institution. Any 
undergraduate applicant who is denied admission to the University may have his case 
reviewed by the Undergraduate Committee for Admissions and Credits. To initiate the 
review procedure, the student should contact the Director of Admissions. Applicants 
should note carefully the law governing legal residence and the penalty for falsifying 
residence information, The law appears in the STUDENT EXPENSES Section of this 
Bulletin. The University of Southern Mississippi does not discriminate on grounds of sex, 
race, color, religion, or national origin. These provisions also apply to handicapped in- 
dividuals pursuant to current federal and state regulations subject to reasonable standards 
of admission and employment. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURES FOR FRESHMEN 
HOW TO APPLY 

Each freshman applicant is required to: 

1 . Present an application for admission. 

2. Have ACT scores sent to the Director of Admissions. The applicant should have a 
composite standard score of fifteen (15). For exceptions see information related to 
transfer students and non-degree students. Freshman applicants desiring to enter 
the School of Nursing must have an ACT composite standard score of eighteen 
(18). Those applicants whose scores are less than eighteen (18), but who meet the 
minimum University entrance requirement of a composite standard score of fifteen 
(15), may request admission to the School of Nursing after completing the first year 
nursing curriculum with a grade of C in each of the natural, behavioral, and social 
sciences, and achieving an overall grade point average of 2.50 on a 4.0 scale. 

3. Provide evidence that he has graduated from high school. Each freshman applicant 
must request that his high school send an official transcript of his record reflecting 
the date of graduation to the Director of Admissions. 

When the applications, transcript, and ACT results have been received, the Office of 
Admissions will send to the applicant notice of eligibility or ineligibility for admission. 
When the student applies early in his senior year, a notice of eligibility is issued as soon as 
processing is completed. This preliminary notice is all that the student needs for planning 
purposes, subject only to completion of his high school program. 

WHEN TO APPLY 

A high school student, especially one who also is applying for financial aid, is urged to 
apply for admission and financial aid early in his senior year. The applicant should have his 
high school mail to the Director of Admissions a transcript complete for his first six 
semesters. A student who applies during his final senior semester should provide a 
transcript complete for the first seven semesters. The deadline for receipt of applications 
and all required credentials, including results of the American College Test, is twenty (20) 
days in advance of the session for which the application is being made. An application is 
processed as soon as possible after all required items are available. A notification of admis- 
sion is then issued to the admissable student. 



16/General Information 



EARLY ADMISSION 



The University will admit a limited number of highly qualified applicants after comple- 
tion of the junior year of high school. To be considered for early admission, the applicant 
must have achieved an exceptional record on a minimum of fifteen (15) units in an ac- 
credited high school, have the unqualified recommendation of his principal or headmaster, 
and have achieved a score of twenty-three (23) on the American College Test. A personal 
interview with the Director of Admissions is required before a decision is made. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

A student who has not been graduated from high school may be admitted if he 
achieves a standard score of forty (40) on each of the five tests or an average standard score 
of forty-five (45) on all five tests of the high-school level General Educational Development 
Tests and meets all other University requirements. The University does not award credit for 
the General Educational Development Tests, College Level. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 
HOW TO APPLY 

Each new student who has attended other colleges or universities and who is seeking 
admission to an undergraduate college or school is required to file with the Office of Ad- 
missions an application for admission (form to be obtained from that office). He should 
also request the authorities at each institution attended to send an official transcript of his 
record to the Director of Admissions. The student who is applying with fewer than twelve 
(12) semester hours of college credit acceptable by this University must also have sent to the 
Director of Admissions his official scores on the American College Test. No application 
will be processed until all required items, including the ACT where applicable, are on file. 
Any exceptions must be approved by the Director of Admissions (see Non-Degree 
Students). 

A student currently enrolled in another institution at the time he makes application 
and applying for admission for the following session to one of the undergraduate colleges 
or schools of this University should arrange to have forwarded to the Director of Admis- 
sions an official transcript which includes a listing of courses in progress as well as all com- 
pleted work. On the basis of these partial credentials, a determination of admission status 
will be made pending receipt of the final transcript, thus enabling the student to make 
definite his plans for transfer. Transfer credit is accepted only from the institutions of 
higher learning which are accredited by a regional accrediting agency or the Mississippi 
Association of Colleges. Students entering from non-accredited institutions will be ac- 
cepted as guest students for one semester (12 hours); at the end of that semester their status 
will be determined on the basis of their performance at the University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

The student must indicate on the application all previous college attendance. An appli- 
cant is not permitted to ignore previous college attendance or enrollment. A student found 
guilty of non-disclosure or misrepresentation in filling out the admission application form, 
or a student who finds after admission or enrollment that he is ineligible for academic or 
any other reason to return to his last institution and who fails to report this immediately to 
the Admissions Office, will be subject to disciplinary action, including possible dismissal 
from the University. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Transfer students desiring admission to the School of Nursing must have their ACT 
scores sent to the Director of Admissions in addition to the other information required of 
transfer students. To be admitted to the School of Nursing, the student must present an 
ACT composite standard score of at least eighteen (18) and an overall grade point average 
of 2.0 on all college courses attempted. Transfer students who do not meet the above ad- 
mission requirements may be admitted to the School of Nursing provided they have com- 
pleted all the courses required in the first year of the nursing curriculum with no less than a 
C in each of the natural, behavioral, and social science courses and have an overall quality 



Transfer Credit/ 17 

(grade) point average of 2.50 on all work attempted prior to admission to the nursing pro- 
gram. Students who do not meet any of the above requirements, but who do meet minimum 
entrance requirements for admission to the University, may request admission to the 
School of Nursing after achieving the required overall grade point average and completing 
with a grade of C each of the natural, behavioral, and social sciences required in the first 
year nursing curriculum. 

WHEN TO APPLY 

The application, required credentials, and the ACT results (when applicable) must be 
on file in the Admissions Office not less than twenty (20) days in advance of the session for 
which application is being made. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

When the application, all required credentials, and the ACT results (if applicable) have 
been received, the Office of Admissions will send to the applicant a notice of eligibility, or 
ineligibility, for admission. 

An evaluation of the transferred credit will be completed as soon as possible after the 
admission has been determined. If the student receives his evaluation prior to registration, 
he should retain it for use during advisement. If he does not receive his evaluation prior to 
registration, he should contact the Admissions Office as soon as possible after his arrival on 
campus. 

REGULATIONS 

The University requires a grade average of C in all previous college work. The applica- 
tions of students whose records do not meet the indicated requirements may be subject to 
review by the Director of Admissions or the Admissions and Credits Committee. 

A student under academic suspension from another college or university may not enter 
the University of Southern Mississippi during the term of his suspension. Upon termination 
of the suspension period there is no bar to admission, if he is eligible in other ways. 

In general, students under disciplinary suspension are not admitted to the University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

Students from fully accredited institutions ordinarily will be given full credit for work 
transferred into the University, insofar as the courses taken are the same as, or equivalent 
to, courses offered in the college in which the student enrolls in this institution. 

Credits transferred from an accredited junior college will be accepted as determined by 
the college or school in which the student is enrolled. In accepting junior college credits, no 
courses will be considered as above sophomore level. Credit earned in institutions which 
have not been fully accredited is usually accepted on the same basis as by the state universi- 
ty of the state in which the institution is situated. When acceptance of credit on a validation 
basis is indicated, the student will be required to validate such credit by at least a 2.0 index 
on his first 12 semester hours of residency study here. Where it seems proper, examinations 
for the validation of credit may be required. 

TRANSFER CREDITS 

Credits transferred from accredited institutions are reproduced on the permanent 
records of the University of Southern Mississippi. This action is evidence that the credits 
are considered valid. Validity, however, is not to be confused with acceptability or ap- 
plicability. 

Applicability of transfer work depends upon the coincidence of transfer credits with 
the requirements of a particular curriculum. Applicability varies from curriculum to cur- 
riculum, not only for transfer students from other institutions but for students transferring 
from one school or curriculum to another within the University of Southern Mississippi. In 
either case the upper limit of the number of applicable credits is the number of accepted 
credits. Applicability is determined by the dean of the college or school to which one is ad- 
mitted. 



18/General Information 

Transfer hours passed will be accepted. To meet graduation requirements transfer 
students must have an overall C average, calculated by the method currently in use at the 
University of Southern Mississippi, on all hours scheduled and rescheduled at all institu- 
tions attended, including the University of Southern Mississippi. Excessive quality points 
earned at other institutions cannot be used to offset any deficiencies at the University of 
Southern Mississippi. Acceptance of junior college work is limited to one-half of the total 
requirements for graduation in a given curriculum. The last half of the total hours applied 
toward graduation must be earned in a senior college. (See also "Graduation and Degree.") 

A maximum of sixty-four (64) semester hours of credit earned through Credit by Ex- 
amination, independent study courses, extension courses, and educational experiences in 
the armed forces combined may be counted toward a degree at the University of Southern 
Mississippi. No more than thirty-two (32) semester hours in a degree program may be earn- 
ed through Credit by Examination. 

Credit will not be granted for college courses carried at another institution of college 
level when a student is enrolled for residence credit in this University except upon prior 
written approval of the dean of the college or university in which the student is enrolled. 

ACCEPTANCE OF MILITARY CREDIT 

1 . The General Educational Development Tests at the High School Level are accepted 
in lieu of a high school diploma. The University does not award credit for the 
General Educational Development Tests, College Level. 

2. Credit for military schools and educational experiences in the armed forces is 
awarded on the basis of recommendations of the American Council on Education. 

3. Correspondence and/or extension courses, including USAFI/DANTES college 
level courses, may be applied toward a degree up to a maximum of thirty-two (32) 
semester hours. No more than nine (9) semester hours of correspondence (USAFI) 
work may be earned in any one field. 

4. Credit from the Community College of the Air Force is accepted toward a degree. 

5. A maximum of sixty-four (64) semester hours of credit earned by independent 
study, extension, and military experience combined may be applied toward a 
degree. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MILITARY PERSONNEL: 
THE BOOTSTRAP PROGRAM 

Military personnel on active duty who attend the University on the Bootstrap Program 
may complete degree requirements with thirty (30) semester hours of work on the Hat- 
tiesburg campus, providing all other degree requirements have been fulfilled. This amount 
of work may be done in two semesters. 

In order to receive an official evaluation of credits to determine eligibility for 
Bootstrap attendance, the following educational credentials must be forwarded: 

1 . A properly executed military Form DD295 . 

2. Official transcripts bearing the raised seal from each institution where credit has 
been earned. 

3. Official transcripts and CLEP scores for courses completed through the United 
States Armed Forces Institute, Madison, Wisconsin. 

4. Official high school transcript. 

5. An application for admission should be submitted with the request for an evalua- 
tion. 

All documents and correspondence should be directed to: 
The Coordinator of Armed Forces Education 
University of Southern Mississippi 
Southern Station, Box 501 1 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 



Credit Limitation/ 19 

NON-DEGREE STUDENTS 

WHO MAY APPLY 

For the adult who wishes to complete certain specific undergraduate courses and not 
pursue a degree, the Director of Admissions may grant that person non-degree status pro- 
vided the applicant meets these conditions: 

a. Has a high school diploma or its equivalent 

b. Must be at least 21 years of age. 

REGULATIONS GOVERNING NON-DEGREE STUDENTS 

Previous academic records are required of all applicants. Applicants for non-degree 
status are required to certify that they are not under suspension from any college or univer- 
sity. A student found guilty of non-disclosure or misrepresentation in filling out the admis- 
sion application form, or a student who finds after admission or enrollment that he is in- 
eligible for academic or any other reason to return to his last institution and who fails to 
report this immediately to the Admissions Office, will be subject to disciplinary action, in- 
cluding possible dismissal from the University. 

The student registered in non-degree status is subject to all University regulations 
governing registration, attendance, and academic standing. Credit earned in non-degree 
status is recorded on the student's permanent record and may be applied in an 
undergraduate degree program when the student has satisfactorily established degree status 
by meeting the entrance requirements of the University and of the degree-granting college 
or school of his choice. A non-degree student may not register for more than nine (9) 
semester hours per semester. 

It is not the policv of the University to permit students from other countries who are in 
the United States on a student visa to register in non-degree status. 

THIRTY-HOUR LIMITATION ON NON-DEGREE STATUS 

A student is permitted to earn a maximum of thirty (30) semester hours of credit in 
non-degree status. No undergraduate college or school of the University will accept in a 
degree program in excess of thirty (30) semester hours earned while the student has been 
registered in non-degree status, nor is a college or school obligated to accept any hours 
earned in non-degree status which do not fulfill college or school degree requirements. The 
student who is approaching the thirty (30) hour limitation in non-degree status, if he wishes 
to continue taking courses for credit, should consult the Admissions Office concerning pro- 
cedures required to establish regular degree status. 

Non-degree students applying for regular status are required to follow admission pro- 
cedures and to provide all items requested of transfer students. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS: 
REGULAR UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS 

1. Foreign students without previous records at high schools, colleges, or universities 
within the United States must meet the requirements outlined above for admission 
as freshman. 

2. If English is not the native language of the student , a score of at least 500 is re- 
quired on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). 

3. Because application processing requires more time for foreign students, all ap- 
plicants residing outside the United States must submit all application materials at 
least three months before the proposed date of entry into the Univeristy. Foreign 
student applicants residing inside the United States must submit all application 
materials at least two months before the proposed date of entry into the University. 

4. Foreign students who have already attended colleges or universities within the 
United States must meet the requirements outlined above for admissions as transfer 
students. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) may be waived if the 
transfer student has successfully completed all freshman English requirements with 
an average of 2.0 or better. 



20/General Information 

5. A ten dollar ($10.00) non-refundable fee must accompany the application for ad- 
mission of each foreign student. 

6. All foreign students should send documents and correspondence to: 
Foreign Student Admissions 

University of Southern Mississippi 
Southern Station, Box 5151 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi U.S.A. 39401 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

Career guidance can be defined as the process of assisting an individual to choose, 
prepare for, enter, and advance in a vocation. The following services are designed to assist 
individuals at any level of their career growth process: 

Career Counseling— The goal of the career counselor is to help the individual make the 
best possible career and educational choices with the maximum information available. In 
career counseling, data from vocational assessment, the person's past experience, and the 
career library are combined to expand the individual's awareness of his/her areas of in- 
terest. Although the counselor utilizes and organizes information for the person and may 
interpret results from vocational assessment, responsibility for making vocational decisions 
always rests with the individual. 

Individual Vocational Testing — Research evidence indicates that different occupations 
tend to attract different types of people in regard to interests, skills, abilities, and personal 
orientation. One purpose of vocational assessment is to help the individual identify possible 
vocational choices that would best meet his/her need needs and qualifications. Another 
purpose would be to help the individual compare himself/herself, in regard to many 
variables, with people in general, as well as with people in different occupational groups. 
Of ultimate value is enhancing knowledge of self to promote a better understanding of the 
merging of self and the world of work in order to further an individual's decision-making 
process in terms of career choice. Areas which may be assessed are intellectual abilities, 
educational interests, vocational interests, personality variables and values. 

Career Information Library — A massive collection of current career-related materials 
pertaining to a wide range of career fields. Types of information available follow: job 
descriptions; places offering employment; necessary training and other qualification; ad- 
vancement opportunities; employment outlook (immediate and long-term); expected 
salaries; working conditions; schools and organizations offering training; scholarships; 
grants and other available financial aid programs. 

Job Finding Skill Development (Resume Preparation and Job Interviewing) — Mini 
courses are offered to develop skills needed to secure employemnt. Benefits include discus- 
sion, role playing, feedback, and special handouts including sample resumes, sample cover 
letters, sample follow-up letters, interviewing tips and admonitions, sample list of questions 
interviewers often ask, worksheets to begin composing resumes, etc. 

The services of the Career Development Center are available by contacting in person, 
by telephone, or by mail: 

Career Development Center 
Southern Station, Box 5112 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 
Phone:266-7111 

ADVISEMENT 

All new students are assigned to academic advisers and are given specific times to meet 
with their advisers for assistance in scheduling classes and planning programs of study to 
meet their individual needs. Assignment of advisers is based on the student's stated educa- 
tional or career plans. Those students who have not established definite educational or 
career plans are assigned to counselors in the Office of Special Academic Services. The Of- 
fice of Special Academic Services provides a continuing program of academic and career 
counseling for all students and prospective students of the University. 



Cooperative Education/21 

ORIENTATION AND PREREGISTRATION: FALL SEMESTER 

New fall freshmen and transfer students entering the University of Southern Mississip- 
pi are encouraged to participate in the summer orientation program, Mini Quarter. The 
orientation programs are designed to acquaint students with University structure, policies, 
procedures, physical layout, faculty, students, organizations, and academic programs. Ac- 
tivities scheduled during the program include: evaluation of credit for transfer students, 
placement testing, academic advisement, small group sessions, open house for sororities, 
fraternities, religious organizations, scheduling classes, and registration. Students will pay 
fees upon return in the fall. 

Parents of freshmen are also invited to attend the summer orientation program. 
Special sessions are planned for parents which include University policies on finances, 
housing, student activities, educational and recreational opportunities, and academic pro- 
grams. Panel discussions are planned for parents on current campus life. 

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE 

Foreign students interested in attending the English Language Institute at the Universi- 
ty of Southern Mississippi for intensified studies in English should direct all cor- 
respondence to: 

The Director of the English Language Institute 

University of Southern Mississippi 

Southern Station, Box 5065 

Hattiesburg, Mississippi, U.S.A. 39401 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

The Cooperative Education Program affords the student the opportunity to gain a 
complete education by alternating periods of academic study with periods of work related 
to the student's major. The Cooperative Education Office assists in securing meaningful 
jobs that will give the student practical work experience and financial support to aid in his 
education. The basic qualifications for the Co-op Program are as follows: 

a. The student must maintain at least 2.00 GPA. 

b. The student must attend USM or a regional campus at least one semester prior to 
his placement. 

c. The student must agree to work alternating semesters. 

A student is eligible to enter the program at any time during his career at USM. 
Transfer students who have been in a co-op program with another university may transfer 
into the USM program and maintain their original job. 

Salaries of co-op students vary depending on the type of degree they are pursuing and 
the amount of co-op experience a student has. The median salary during the 1979-1980 
school term was estimated at $700.00 per month. 

The Office of Cooperative Education will determine the eligibilty of students to par- 
ticipate in the program and screen their placement. Each student's record of performance 
will be periodically reviewed, once an active participant, and he or she may be placed on 
probation or removed from the program when not meeting minimum requirements. 

Academic credit for work assignment will be determined by the student's major 
department and is not necessarily a part of the program. 
For additional information, contact the 
Cooperative Education Coordinator 
Southern Station, Box 5112 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 or telephone 
(601)266-7111 



22/General Information 

THE STUDENT COMMUNITY, 
CAMPUS LIFE, AND ACTIVITIES 

STUDENT HOUSING 

Resident Housing 

Three thousand one hundred and sixty-five (3,165) spaces in air-conditioned residence 
halls and three hundred and ninety-two (392) spaces in non-air-conditioned residence halls 
are available for students in thirteen (13) residence halls operated by the University. These 
include three residence halls which incorporate their own dining facilities (Hillcrest for 
women, Elam Arms for men, and Vann Hall for men on athletic scholarships). Elam Arms 
and Hillcrest have heated swimming pools. Bolton, Jones, Pulley, Roberts, Scott, and 
Wilber are the other air-conditioned residence halls for women. Bond is the other air- 
conditioned hall for men. Hattiesburg is the air-cooled residence hall for men and 
Mississippi Hall and Hickman are the air-cooled residence halls for women. 

When a student occupies a room in a residence hall, he obligates himself to pay for one 
semester's room rent for that hall. Refunds for unused portion of room rent will be made 
only in case of withdrawal from the University. Residence hall fees are subject to change 
without notice. It is the responsibility of the student to determine the amount of fees for the 
residence hall to which he is assigned. 

Each resident will be asked to contribute to the Residence Hall Fund which is used to 
pay for Homecoming decorations, courtesies, and other residence hall-sponsored activities. 

All regularly enrolled undergraduate students under 21 years of age are required to live 
in one of the residence halls, unless they are married or live with parents or legal guardian, 
or have completed 65 semester hours and have parental consent to live off campus. 

Students found to be residing off campus in violation of the on-campus-policy may be 
charged a full semester's room rent regardless of the time during the semester they are 
found to be in violation of the policy. 

THE UNIVERSITY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO ENTER ROOMS FOR IN 
SPECTION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Application for campus housing should be made at the time of application for admis- 
sion to the University. Applications are processed in order of date received, and residence 
hall assignments are based on the date of application. Roommate preference may be in- 
dicated on the application form, and, when possible, these preferences will be granted. 
However, the application is for accommodations in the residence halls and not for a 
specific roommate. Assignments of new students (freshman and transfer) to residence halls 
can be made only after the $40.00 deposit with an application for housing has been received 
by the Housing Office. 

Priority of residence hall assignments goes to enrolled and former students. Assign- 
ment of enrolled and former students will be made at the end of each semester for the 
suceeding semester. 

Residence hall assignments are mailed at least 15 days prior to the first day of registra- 
tion for each semester. Those applying after the beginning of this fifteen-day period will 
receive a room assignment by mail if possible. If it is too late to mail the assignment, it may 
be secured at the Housing Office on the day the residence halls open. 

Any person cancelling his reservation 15 days prior to the first day of registration will 
be refunded the $40.00 deposit. Those failing to cancel prior to the 15 days will forfeit their 
deposit. Cancellations must be made in writing. 

Sorority members are expected to live in Wilber Hall, the Panhellenic Hall. Lodging in 
a fraternity house is available to the fraternity members and pledges. Arrangements are 
made directly with the fraternity. 

During fall semester, all residence halls will open at 8:00 a.m., two days prior to 
registration. Students who have been assigned a specific room must claim their room by 
5:00 p.m. on the first day or forfeit their priority to that designated space. All other 
students must claim their room by 5:00 p.m. on the second day. During the spring semester 
and summer session, the residence halls will open at noon, one day prior to registration. 
New students must claim their rooms by 5:00 p.m. on the day the halls open. Former 
students must claim their rooms by 5:00 p.m. on the first day of registration. 



Student Life/23 

Changes between residence halls are made after registration with Housing Office ap- 
proval. However, room changes may be made within the residence hall to which a student is 
assigned, provided the change has been approved by the Housing staff member of the 
residence hall and officially arranged in the Housing Office before the change is made. 

Any person failing to claim his room by the time indicated above will forfeit the 
deposit. 

The visitation program at U.S.M. is directed by the Department of Student Housing. 
Each residence hall shall have the option to adopt regularly scheduled visitation hours each 
semester. All residents will be required to vote and three-fourths majority vote shall con- 
stitute the decision of the residence hall. Hours may be established within the following 
guidelines: 

Maximum of five hours per day 
6:30 PM to 1 1 :30 PM on Friday 
2:00 PM to 1 1 :30 PM on Saturday and Sunday 
and should not exceed 15 hours each week. There is a non-visitation floor in Jones (women) 
and Bond (men) for those students who do not wish to participate in the visitation program. 
All checks or money orders for housing deposits should be made out to the University 
of Southern Mississippi and mailed to: 
The Director of Housing 
University of Southern Mississippi 
Southern Station, Box 5064 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 
Other information concerning housing is available in the housing brochure. 

Family Housing 

Pine Haven Apartments, consisting of two hundred and ninety-six (296) one-two-and 
three-bedroom unfurnished units, are available on the campus for married students. A long 
waiting list exists each semester. An applicant's position on the list is determined by the 
date of receipt of the application and deposit. 

The housing fee is payable at the beginning of the semester. The rent is due and 
payable at registration. A student obligates himself to the full fee for one semester's rent 
when he moves in, unless he withdraws from the University. A deposit of $15.00 is required 
at the time of application and is refundable if the request is cancelled thirty (30) days prior 
to the date for which the application is made. An additional $25.00 deposit is required upon 
receiving assignment to Pine Haven. The total deposit of $40.00 will be refunded when a 
student withdraws from housing without any outstanding charges to the University. 

Applications and brochures may be secured at the Pine Haven Office, or by writing the 
Director of Housing. 

Correct Address 

Students are required at registration to give their correct local address. It is the respon- 
sibility of each student to notify the Registrar's Office of any change of address as soon as 
the change occurs. 

FOOD SERVICE 

All persons living in residence halls are required to purchase a meal ticket for one of 
the food service facilities on campus. The Food Service Department serves well-planned, at- 
tractive meals which include a choice of two entrees, assorted vegetables, and self-service 
beverage and salad bars. All students are welcome at the Commons cafeteria. Elam Arms 
and Hillcrest cafeterias are for residents only. Guests are allowed, but each guest must be 
accompanied by a resident. 

The Commons offers a special diet program for weight watchers at an additional cost. 
Elam Arms and Hillcrest cafeterias will be open five days weekly, Monday through Friday. 
All week-end meals will be served at the University Commons. Students who purchase a 5- 
day meal plan are welcome at the Commons on weekends, but must pay cash for their 
meals. 

The Union Coffee Shop offers a wide variety of delicious snacks, short orders, and a 
selection of beverages. This a' la carte food service offers a commuter meal ticket, which is 
available to all off-campus students. 



24/GeneraI Information 



HEALTH AND SAFETY SERVICES 



While away from home, the University Clinic serves as the family doctor offering the 
same range of services available at his office. Overnight clinic accommodation for less 
serious illness is available at no cost to full-time students. Consultation and hospitalization 
services of the patient's choice are available on a referral basis. The Clinic services include 
physician and nursing care (provided at no cost to full-time students only) and laboratory, 
x-ray, and apothecary service, all available at cost. 

There is an excellent supplemental health insurance policy available. For information, 
go to Room 100, Student Services Building. 

During the regular school semester the Clinic is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week 
and is staffed by registered nurses. Physician's office hours are 9-12 and 1-5 Monday 
through Friday. The apothecary is open only during the physicans' office hours. 

AUTOMOBILES ON CAMPUS 

Students and employees of the University are required to register their automobiles 
with the Department of Campus Security. Temporary permits are issued when the 
automobile is to be on the campus less than fourteen days. Parking zones have been 
established along with other regulations. A brochure which outlines traffic and parking 
regulations may be secured from the Department of Campus Security. Penalities are assess- 
ed for violation of regulations and persistent violators may be denied the privilege of 
operating their vehicle on campus. Penalties are: violation of parking and/or decal viola- 
tions $5.00 each; all moving violations $10.00 each. 

All vehicle registrations expire August 31 , except for bicycles. Registration fees are: 

Automobiles/$5 .00 

Motorcycles/$2.00 

Bicycles/$1 .00 for length of enrollment. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The main source of the extra curricular activities at the University of Southern 
Mississippi is the multitude of student organizations and activities. Some 180 student 
organizations, of almost as many purposes and objectives, grace the Southern scene. These 
organizations include all categories of participation: service, social, religious, professional, 
honorary, activity, on and on to provide an opportunity for almost any interested student 
to participate. While these activities are outside of or "extra to" the formal curricula they 
are unquestionably a part of the student's total experience while he is enrolled at the 
University of Southern Mississippi. 

In addition to the numerous student organizations, there are three groups which, by 
their representative function, serve the entire student body in their various capacities and 
areas. These groups are: Associated Student Body, University Activities Council, and Stu- 
dent Religious Federation. 

While these groups are deliberative and purpose to represent the views and wishes of 
the entire student body, other student governing groups may be found in the residence 
halls, the fraternity and sorority system, and the international student community. 



ASSOCIATED STUDENT BODY 

The Associated Student Body of USM consists of every student enrolled in the Univer- 
sity. It is structurally set up on government form, with executive, legislative, and judicial 
branches. The officers of the ASB comprise the executive branch, elected representatives 
from each school and college of the University make up the Senate or legislative branch, 
and the student courts comprise the judicial branch. 

The ASB, however, is much more than a tightly structured student organization. It is 
an aid to the student in his University life, and is his official voice in University affairs. In 
maintaining this position of responsibility, the ASB serves the student in special services 
and projects and represents him on various committees and boards. 

These services include a check cashing service, tutoring service, apartment directory, 



Organizations/25 

attorney referral program, refrigerator rental, ride board, spouse card, discount directory, 
tax service, and student activity calendar. 

ASB projects include voter registration drives, Miss Southern Pageant, spirit activities 
and cheerleaders, the student handbook, legislative lobbying, and recruiting. 

ASB officials represent the student body on the Academic Council, Graduate Council, 
University Council, Disciplinary Committee, Athletic Continuity Committee, President's 
Board, Mayor's Student Board, Student Alumni Association, Student Aid and Scholarship 
Committee, Student Activity Committee, Library Committee, University Union Commit- 
tee, and the Governor's and Congressmen Committee. 

The Associated Student Body is constantly trying to improve the existing programs 
and services and implement new ones. It also continually attempts to voice student concerns 
in University affairs. By doing this, the ASB strives to meet its goal of promoting the 
general welfare of students in all phases of their lives at USM. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

THE STUDENT PRINTZ, winner of many national awards, is the University 
newspaper published semi-weekly by a staff of students under the direction of faculty ad- 
visers. THE SOUTHERNER is a yearly publication, published by a student staff under the 
direction of a faculty adviser. PRODUCT, issued yearly and sponsored by Lambda Iota 
Tau, represents the best of student endeavor in short stories , essays, and poetry. A hand- 
book for students is published by the ASB. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

The University of Southern Mississippi is a state supported school and is entirely non- 
sectarian. Religious life is encouraged, and every effort is made to cooperate with local 
churches. The Student Religious Federation unifies the activities of all religious groups on 
the campus. 

It is composed of students from the entire University community and seeks to provide 
channels for worship and religious development. Speakers, concerts, films, forums, and 
debates are some of its sponsored activities. 

Religious Organization — Baptist Student Union, Campus Crusade for Christ, Chi 
Alpha, Christian Science, Episcopal Students, Hallelujah Way, Inter-Varsity Christian 
Fellowship, Jewish Student Union/Hillel, Campus Advance-Church of Christ, Latter Day 
Saints, Lutheran Fellowship, Newman Club-Roman Catholic, Student Religious Federa- 
tion, Wesley-Methodist, Westminster-Presbyterian, Muslim Student League, Navigators. 

The office of the University Chaplin and Coordinator of Religious Affairs works with 
all campus religious groups in helping them to effect their ministeries. 

Danforth Chapel is a place of prayer and mediation for all and is often used for wor- 
ship services and weddings. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

General Honor Societies — There are five general honor societies on the campus. A 
general honor society is an association that receives into membership individuals who have 
achieved high scholarship and who fulfill such additional requirements of distinction in 
some broad field of education and culture or in general leadership as the society has 
established. Phi Kappa Phi is a national honor society composed of men and women who 
have achieved superior scholarship accorded by the University. Omicron Delta Kappa is a 
national honorary leadership society, membership in which is the highest recognition ac- 
corded students of the University. Phi Delta Rho is a local honorary leadership society, 
membership in which is the highest recognition accorded women students of the University. 
Alpha Lambda Delta and Phi Eta Sigma are national honor societies which aim to en- 
courage and reward high scholastic attainment among freshman students. 

Academic Honor Societies— Alpha Epsilon Alpha (accounting), Alpha Epsilon Delta 
(medicine), Alpha Psi Omega (dramatics), American Chemical Society Student Affiliate, 
Student Chapter of American Marketing Association (marketing), Beta Beta Beta 
(biology), Beta Gamma Sigma (business), Delta Sigma Pi (business), Eta Sigma Gamma 



26/General Information 

(health and safety education), Home Economics Club, Kappa Delta Pi (education), Kappa 
Kappa Psi (band), Kappa Mu Epsilon (mathematics), Kappa Omicron Phi (home 
economics), Lambda Iota Tau (literary), Lambda Sigma, Mu Phi Epsilon (music), 
Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics), Orchesis (dance), Pershing Rifles Honor Society, Phi 
Alpha Theta (history), Phi Beta Lambda, Phi Delta Kappa (education), Phi Mu Alpha Sin- 
fonia (music), Phi Chi Theta (women-business), Pi Delta Phi (French), Pi Gamma Mu 
(social science), Pi Kappa Lamba (music), Pi Omega Pi (business education), Pi Tau Chi 
(religion), Psi Chi (psychology), Rho Epsilon (real estate), Scabbard and Blade Society 
(military), Sigma Theta Tau (nursing), Society of Advancement of Management, Tau Beta 
Sgima (band). 

Service Organizations — Alpha Phi Omega, Angel Flight, Arnold Air Society, Botegha, 
Business Fraternity Council, Circle K Club, Del Sur Company of L'Esprit de Corps, 
Honors Student Association, Interfraternity Council, Junior Panhellenic Council, Little 
Sisiers of Minerva, M Club, Panhellenic Council, Pen and Sword, Phi Lambda Pi, Social 
and Rehabilitation Club, Veterans Voice of USM. 

Other Organizations — American Cultural Society, Alpha Kappa Mu, American Civil 
Liberties Union, Beinvenidos, Chi Tau Epsilon, Chinese Student Association of USM, 
Food and Nutrition Club, Food Service Executive Association, Go-Shin-Do Martial Arts 
Team, Hallelujah Way, Hattiesburg Bike Club, HPER, Information Film Producers of 
America, Jewish Student Union, Latin American Cultural Exchange Society, Library 
Science Student Association, Logos, Love, Salvation, Determination Choir, Magnolia 
Junior Branch Food Service, Medical Technology Club, Moslem Students Association, Phi 
Theta Kappa Alumni Association of USM, Progressive Student Association, School of 
Social Work Club, Seven Jewels Study Club, Snow Ski Club, Society for Paralegal Studies 
Southern Barbell Club, Southern Geological Society, Southern Style, Southwestern Ex- 
ecutive Sales Club, Star Dusters of Kappa Sigma, Student Alumni Association, Student 
Broadcasters Association, Student Chapter of Music Educators National Conference, Stu- 
dent's International Mediation Society, Student Nursing Association, The Coalition for 
Student Involvement, The Student Guild, USM Aquatics Club, USM Art Education Club, 
USM Association for Promotion of Athletics, USM Bowling Sports Club, USM Citizens 
Band Club, USM Doctoral Students in Educational Administration and Supervision, USM 
Chapter of Council for Exceptional Children, USM Chapter of Lambda Alpha Epilson. 
USM Collegiate Civitan Club, USM Community Chess Club, USM Golden Girls, USM 
Student Constructors, USM Society of Helping Hands, USM Society of Polymer Scientists, 
USM Softball Association, USM Student Planning Network, USM Table Tennis Club, 
USM Volleyball Club, USM Waterski Club, University Activities Council, Young 
Democrats, Young Republicans. 

Social Fraternities — Ten social fraternities hold membership in the Interfraternity 
Council of the University. They are Alpha Tau Omega, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, 
Kappa Sigma, Omega Psi Phi, Pi Kappa Alpha, Phi Kappa Tau, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
Sigma Nu, and Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Social Sororities— Twelve social sororities hold membership in the Panhellenic Coun- 
cil of the University. They are Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Sigma Alpha, Chi Omega, Delta 
Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Delta Sigma Theta, Delta Zeta, Kappa Delta, Phi Mu, Pi Beta 
Phi, Sigma Gamma Rho, and Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

Dramatic, Musical and Other Performing Groups— The University's preeminence in 
the fine arts fields of theatre and music is reflected in the prominent role of student per- 
forming groups. The Debate Squad and the University's own radio station also encourage 
student performance. 

THE UNIVERSITY THEATRE is the campus dramatic organization sponsored by 
the Department of Theatre Arts. Open auditions are held for all productions and any stu- 
dent enrolled at the University is eligible to participate. 

THE OPERA THEATRE, open to all students of the University by audition, per- 
forms many works of musico-dramatic interest during the year. 

THE UNIVERSITY SINGERS, auditions for which are held during the first week of 
each semester, give numerous concerts and tours. There is usually a waiting list of ap- 
plicants for membership. Within the UNIVERSITY SINGERS are a number of smaller 
ensembles, such as the Madrigal Singers and various male and female groups. 

The University's bands and orchestras have an outstanding record of service to the 
University and the state. 



Athletics/27 

THE SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE, THE SYMPHONIC BAND, AND 
THE CONCERT BAND are open to all University students by audition. 

THE MARCHING BAND, known as "THE PRIDE OF MISSISSIPPI," presents 
colorful halftime shows at the University football games and appears regularly on national 
television. It is open to all University students. 

THE DIXIE DARLINGS, a precision drill group, open by audition to the best girl 
dancers of the University, are well-known nationally through their many televised ap- 
pearances with the Marching Band. 

COLLEGIUM MUSICUM, open to singers, players of recorder, sackbut, krumhorn, 
viol, harpsichord, lute, cornetto, or other historical instruments, and to students with an in- 
terest in a scholarly, musicological approach to the performance of old and neglected 
music. 

THE CHAMBER ENSEMBLES perform serious programs of the best original 
music for smaller groups. 

THE PERCUSSION CHOIR AND MARIMBA ENSEMBLE utilize programs of 
original music for chamber percussion performance. 

THE JAZZ LABORATORY BANDS are full-sized modern jazz ensembles which 
play the latest arrangements of music in the big band contemporary idiom. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI SYMPHONY, open to all 
students and faculty members of the University by audition, gives a number of concerts 
each year in addition to assisting with oratorios and operas. 

Scholarships for these musical groups are available to talented students. Auditions 
may be arranged through the Department of Music. 

Debate: The Department of Speech Communication sponsors a public debate program 
called Inquiry and Advocacy. The programs are conducted on campus and include both a 
public interview of experts on the designated topic and a parliamentary debate, with those 
experts available for cross-examination. An audience is present at both sessions and is en- 
couraged to participate. Regardless of experience in debate, students are welcome to join in 
this unique educational experience. 

THE DEBATE SQUAD, open to all students, engages in intercollegiate competition 
at tournaments throughout the southeastern states. Students interested should contact the 
Department of Speech Communication. Some scholarships are available. 

WMSU-AM is a University-owned carrier current radio station which broadcasts to 
the campus audience on 640 Khz. Students interested in working with the WMSU-AM staff 
should contact the Department of Radio, Television, and Film. 

WMSU-FM is a University-owned educational radio-station which broadcasts to the 
Hattiesburg area. The student staff is selected by open auditions under the direction of the 
faculty adviser. Students interested in seeking a position on WMSU-FM should contact the 
Department of Radio, Television, and Film. 



ATHLETICS 

The University of Southern Mississippi is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association, the College Football Association, and the Association of Intercollegiate 
Athletics for Women. 

Intercollegiate sports are football, basketball, baseball, tennis, golf, track, swimming, 
cross country, and women's tennis, basketball, Softball, and volleyball. 

Seasonal intramural sports, under the supervision of personnel from the Department 
of Intramural Sports, give every student an opportunity to take part in competition. 
Among the sports included on the program are tennis, golf, touch football, basketball, 
softball, badminton, volleyball, handball, track and swimming. 

The University golf course, tennis courts, swimming pool, playgrounds, and gym- 
nasium facilities are available to all students. 



R.C. COOK UNIVERSITY UNION 

The center of student activities at the University of Southern Mississippi is the R.C. 
Cook University Union, which houses the student organization offices, coffee shop, recrea- 
tional area, and meeting rooms. Students use the facilities of the University Union for 



28/General Information 

recreation, social, religious, and organizational activities. The Union holds membership in 
the Association of College Unions — International. 

UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES COUNCIL 

The University Activities Council (UAC) is made up of interested students selected 
through an application-interview procedure. UAC activities include all facets of collegiate 
programming, the more prominent of which are: weekly movies, concerts, lectures, special 
events, and travel. 

The University Activities Council is recognized throughout the Gulf South as one of 
the outstanding collegiate programming groups, budgeted on per-student fee basis, that 
allows all students to attend UAC activities on the presentation of their student identifica- 
tion card, except for big name concerts when a nominal fee is charged. 

Holding membership in the National Entertainment Conference, the UAC keeps 
abreast of collegiate programming trends and developments throughout the nation, as well 
as the Gulf South. 

UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER 

The purpose of the University Counseling Center is to assist each individual in deriving 
maximum benefit from his University experience and developing his full range of poten- 
tialities. The following professional counseling services are provided: vocational, educa- 
tional, personal, and marital. 

Students interested in choosing a major, exploring career choices, or dealing with some 
aspects of personal or social development should feel free to contact the Center for an ap- 
pointment. Everything that is said during a counseling interview is regarded as confidential. 
No information is released to any individual except with the approval of the student. 

When appropriate, the student and the counselor may select tests to appraise abilities, 
interests, or personality characteristics. A library of educational and occupational informa- 
tion is maintained. College catalogs from other institutions and many books and pamphlets 
on educational and personal adjustment are also available. 

Besides assisting students on an individual basis, the Center provides group study skills 
training to enable students to handle their academic pursuits better. How to organize study 
time, how to take notes, and how to take examinations are a few of the topics covered. 

The Center provides growth experiences for students. Primary goals of these ex- 
periences are developing the student's ability to communicate and enhancing his skills in in- 
terpersonal relationships. The goal, therefore, is to provide students a chance to obtain in- 
sight into their own behavior and the behavior of others in the context of a group ex- 
perience. 

The Center staff is available to work with campus groups in providing leadership or 
communication training. The primary goals of these groups are to improve leadership 
abilities and to enhance the communication function in organized group activity. 

The Center is located in Room 200, Student Services Building. It is open from 8:00 
A.M. to 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday. Any person who is enrolled or expects to 
enroll as a student may use the services without charge. Spouses of students often use the 
Center. In order to make an appointment, a student may come by the Center or call 266- 
71 1 1 or write to: 

Director of the University Counseling Center 
University of Southern Mississippi 
Southern Station, Box 5075 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 

OFFICE OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 

The Office of Veterans Affairs is responsible for providing assistance to veterans and 
dependents of eligible veterans that will enable them to derive the maximum benefit from 
their veterans educational entitlement. Specific activities of this office include recruitment, 
outreach, counseling, tutorial assistance, basic education, and it sponsors the campus 
veterans organization. 



Expenses/29 



OFFICE OF SPECIAL SERVICES 



The Office of Special Services is responsible for providing educational assistance to 
students who are educationally and economically disadvantaged. This office is administer- 
ing developmental programs to enhance these students' chances of deriving maximum 
benefit from their college experience. Specific services include counseling, tutoring, study 
skills, growth activities, and the coordination of developmental education programs in 
English, mathematics, and reading. 

PLACEMENT SERVICES 

The Office of Placement Services, located on the first floor of McLemore Hall, offers 
the student two types of employment opportunities while attending the University; part- 
time employment as well as career employment upon graduation. All employment op- 
portunities are offered free to both the students and the prospective employer. 

The Student Employment Division offers the student an opportunity to obtain part- 
time employment while enrolled as a regular student at Southern. The service is comprehen- 
sive in that it will involve jobs for work-study as well as non-work study both on and off 
campus. 

The Career Employment Division provides assistance to graduating seniors, graduates, 
and alumni in obtaining career employment upon or after graduation. 

All students should register with Placement Services and establish a placement creden- 
tials folder during the last semester of their junior year or the first semester of their senior 
year. These credentials are valuable to prospective employers that are seeking information 
on college graduates for possible employment. The file is permanent, and can be used by 
the graduate as often as it is needed. 

STUDENT EXPENSES 

The University of Southern Mississippi is supported chiefly by legislative appropria- 
tions. Increases in student fees are put into effect only when public support funds are inade- 
quate and no other recourse is available. Increases are made only for support of the institu- 
tion or improvement of the activity program of the students; therefore the University must 
reserve the right to increase or modify fees and expenses without prior notice but with ap- 
proval of the Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning. 

Fees and expenses are in the form of general tuition, room and board, and special fees. 

GENERAL TUITION. This fee, together with the allocation from the legislative ap- 
propriation, is used for general support of the University. Athletic activities, health service, 
and UAC programs are not included for part-time students. 

Full-time students for purposes of assessing fees are those who take nine (9) or more 
semester hours in Graduate School and twelve (12) or more semester hours in all other 
schools and colleges during fall and spring semesters. During summer terms, seven (7) or 
more semester hours for Graduate School and nine (9) or more semester hours in all other 
schools and colleges constitute full-time students for purposes of assessing fees. Students 
enrolled for more than nineteen (19) semester hours will be assessed the applicable fee for 
each additional semester hour. 

Textbooks, except for textbooks in foreign language courses and certain other courses, 
are provided on a loan basis to all undergraduate students. 

Clinical and hospital services covered by the health service charge included in the 
general tuition fee are limited to cases of ordinary illness. Services are provided within the 
limits of the professional, technical, and physical resources of the Clinic. The University 
does not assume responsibility in cases of extended illness or for treatment of chronic 
diseases. Cases requiring surgery must be handled by a physician and hospital of the stu- 
dent's choice. 

ROOM, BOARD, AND POST OFFICE BOX. The room, board, and post office 
box fees are assessed for all students living in University-controlled residence halls and 
those students living in fraternity houses. Board is available to all other students on an op- 
tional basis. Two meal plans are available in the Commons: seven-day, twenty-meal plan 
and a five-day, fifteen-meal plan. Weight-watcherss diets are available at $35 extra per 
semester. 



30/GeneraI Information 

A room deposit of $40 is payable in advance for the reservation of space in the 
residence hall. This amount is held as a damage deposit until a student withdraws from the 
residence hall. Upon withdrawal, the student must make an application to the Resident 
Manager of the dormitory for refund of the $40. A student accepting residence hall space 
will be financially obligated to pay the full semester's room rent. A rent refund will be made 
only upon withdrawal from the University. 

OTHER FINANCIAL INFORMATION. Fees of all students are due and payable at 
time of registration; however, fees of students enrolled for six semester hours or more may 
be paid one-half upon entrance and the balance one week prior to the beginning of the se- 
cond half of the semester. Students with University loans, grants, or scholarships may defer 
only one-half of the amount not covered by their loan, grant, or scholarship. A $10.00 late 
charge will be assessed on any fees not paid in full by one week prior to the beginning of the 
second half of the semester. This procedure applies on all campuses and resident center 
locations. 

The University reserves the right to withhold readmission to a student until all delin- 
quent accounts have been paid. Transcripts of credits will not be issued for students whose 
accounts are deliquent. All fees must be paid before a degree is awarded. 

Fines accumulated as a result of failure to adhere to the established procedures of the 
University, such as Library and Security regulations, or any other policy establishing 
regulations for the protection of University property, shall become collectible by the Bur- 
sar's Office, and, if not collected, shall constitute a deliquent account. 

Students whose checks for registration are returned will be assessed the late registra- 
tion fee of $10.00, in addition to the $6.00 returned check handling fee. 

A fee of $3.00 for operation of the University Union is included in the fees of all full- 
time students. A $1.00 fee is added to the general tuition fee assessment of part-time 
students. 

Courses requiring special fees and music fees are shown in the Special Fee listing 
(Table II). 



RESIDENCE STATUS 

LEGAL RESIDENCE OF STUDENTS: The definitions and conditions stated here are 
as required by state law in the classification of students as residents or nonresidents for the 
assessment of fees. Requests for a review of residency classification should be submitted to 
the Dean of Special Academic Services; forms for this purpose are available from the Dean 
of Special Academic Services' office. 

A MINOR: The residence of a person less than twenty-one years of age is that of the 
father. After the death of the father, the residence of the minor is that of the mother. If the 
parents are divorced, the residence of the minor is that of the parent who was granted 
custody by the court; or, if custody was not granted, the residence continues to be that of 
the father. If both parents are dead, the residence of the minor is that of the last surviving 
parent at the time of that parent's death, unless the minor lives with a legal guardian of his 
person duly appointed by a proper court of Mississippi, in which case his residence becomes 
that of the guardian. 

AN ADULT: The residence of an adult is that place where he is domiciled, that is, the 
place where he actually physically resides with the intention of remaining there indefinitely 
or of returning there permanently when temporarily absent. Adult students who are 
residing outside of the State of Mississippi, but whose parents have moved to this state and 
have become residents, must establish residence in their own right. In determining residence 
for tuition purposes for persons who return to Mississippi after temporary departures such 
as school attendance, work elsewhere or military service, cognizance is taken of evidence 
showing continuity of state residence and demonstrated intent to return to the state. 

REMOVAL OF PARENTS FROM MISSISSIPPI: If the parents of a minor who is 
enrolled as a student in an insitution of higher learning move their legal residence from the 
State of Mississippi, the minor is immediately classified as a nonresident student. 

TWELVE MONTHS OF RESIDENCE REQUIRED: No student may be admitted to 
the University as a resident of Mississippi unless his residence, as defined herinabove, has 
been in the State of Mississippi for a continuous period of at least twelve months im- 
mediately preceding his admission. 



Refund Policy/31 

RESIDENCE IN AN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION CAN BE COUNTED: A stu- 
dent who has lived within the state for twelve months following his twenty-first birthday 
may establish residence in his own right by showing that he is living in the state with the in- 
tention of abandoning his former domicile and remaining in the State of Mississippi per- 
manently, or for an indefinite length of time. Intent may be demonstrated or disproved by 
factors including, but not limited to, filing of Mississippi income tax returns, eligibility to 
vote in Mississippi, motor vehicle registration in Mississippi, possession of a Mississippi 
operator's license, place of employment, and self support. 

RESIDENCE STATUS OF A MARRIED WOMAN: A married woman may claim the 
residence of her husband, or she may claim independent residence status under the same 
regulations, set forth above, as any other adult. 

CHILDREN OF PARENTS WHO ARE EMPLOYED BY THE UNIVERSITY: 
Children of parents who are members of the faculty or staff of the University may be 
classified as residents without regard to the residence requirement of twelve months 

MILITARY PERSONNEL ASSIGNED ON ACTIVE DUTY STATION IN 
MISSISSIPPI: Members of the armed forces on extended active duty and stationed within 
the State of Mississippi, except those military personnel whose active duty assignment is for 
educational purposes, may be classified as residents, without regard to the residence re- 
quirement of twelve months, for the purpose of attendance at the University. Resident 
status of such military personnel who are not legal residents of Mississippi, as defined 
above under LEGAL RESIDENCE OF AN ADULT, shall terminate upon their reassign- 
ment for duty in the continental United States outside the State of Mississippi 

CHILDREN OF MILITARY PERSONNEL: Resident status of children of members 
of the armed forces on extended active duty shall be that of the military parent for the pur- 
pose of attending the University during the time that their military parents are stationed 
within the State of Mississippi and shall be continued through the time that military parents 
are stationed in an overseas area with last duty assignment within the State of Mississippi, 
excepting temporary training assignments en route from Mississippi. Resident status of 
minor children shall terminate upon reassignment under permanent change of station 
orders of their military parents for duty in the continental United States outside the State of 
Mississippi, excepting temporary training assignments en route from Mississippi. 

CERTIFICATION OF RESIDENCE OF MILITARY PERSONNEL: A military per 
son on active duty stationed in Mississippi who wishes to avail himself or his dependents of 
the provisions of the paragraph titled MILITARY PERSONNEL ASSIGNED ON AC- 
TIVE DUTY STATION IN MISSISSIPPI must submit a certificate from his military 
organization showing the name of the military member, the name of the dependent, if for a 
dependent, the name of the organization of assignment and its address (may be in the let- 
terhead), that the military member will be on active duty stationed in Mississippi on the date 
of registration at the University; that the military member is not on transfer orders; and the 
signature of the commanding officer, the adjutant, or the personnel officer of the unit of 
assignment with signer's rank and title. A military certificate must be presented to the 
Registrar of the University each semester at (or within ten days prior to) registration for the 
provisions of the paragraph MILITARY PERSONNEL ASSIGNED ON ACTIVE DUTY 
STATION IN MISSISSIPPI, named above, to be effective. 

LEGAL RESIDENCE OF A FOREIGN STUDENT: Students with permanent im- 
migrant status or refugee status can establish residence in the state by meeting the provi- 
sions of the Mississippi Statute. 

PETITIONS FOR CHANGE OF RESIDENCY: Petitions for change of residency 
must be made on or before the last day a student may register at the particular institution 
without penalty. 

REFUND POLICY: A student who officially withdraws after enrollment may obtain a 
refund in accordance with the following: 

Through second week 80°7o 

Through third week 60% 

Through fourth week 40% 

Through fifth week 25% 

After fifth week None 



32/General Information 

The refund schedule above applies to students who drop to an hourly load below full 
time or from an overload to full time or below. The applicable percentage then applies to 
the difference between fees calculated on the resulting hourly load and the original assess- 
ment. 

Room and board fees are refunded on the basis of full weeks remaining in the 
semester. 

Appeals for refunds due to extenuating circumstances may be made in writing to the 
Vice President for Business and Finance, University of Southern Mississippi, Southern Sta- 
tion Box 5005, Hattiesburg, MS 39401 . 

Students who find it necessary to withdraw from the University must submit written 
requests to the deans of their schools or colleges. Those students who are undecided as to 
their majors should direct their written requests to the Admissions Office. Oral requests 
will not be accepted. 



TABLE I 
EXPENSES EACH UNIVERSITY SEMESTER/SESSION 

(All fees are subject to change without notice. See page 29.) 



FULL-TIME STUDENTS FALL, SPRING SUMMER 

SEMESTERS SESSION 

Fixed Fees 

General Tuition $ 388.00 $ 246.00 

Room rent: 

Hillcrest and Elam Arms 385.00 240.00 

Vann 370.00 230.00 

Other Air Conditioned Halls 325.00 216.00 

All Other Halls 285.00 196.00 

Board: 

5-day plan 310.00 210.00 

7-day plan 340.00 230.00 

Other Fees When Applicable 

Non-Resident Fee 425 .00 

* The Southerner (Fall only) 7.00 

**Post Office Box 3.00 2.00 

PART-TIME STUDENTS— Each semester hour - All Campuses: 

General Tuition — graduate student 37.00 35.00 

General Tuition— undergraduate student 31.00 29.00 

Non-resident fee: 

Graduate student 47.00 

Undergraduate student 35.00 

* Non-refundable. Charged the first semester attended each year to all full-time 

undergraduate students. Optional to all other students living off campus. 
"Non-refundable. Optional to students living off campus. 

General tuition, room, board, and post office, if applicable, are payable each semester/ses- 
sion. 

TABLE II 

SPECIAL FEES AND EXPENSES 

Departmental Fees: 

REF4I6,619,735,741;LS4I6,516,622 $ 7.50 per course 

ADE 495 7.00 per semester 

CTE 480, 482, 484, 492, 493, each 20.00 per course 

HEE 403 20.00 per course 



Fees and Expenses/33 



SPE 312, 480, 482, 483, 485, 486, each 20.00 per course 

LS 489 10.00 per course 

REC 300 50.00 per course 

CIS 48 1 , 482, 483, 484, 485, 486, 487 

488,489,491,492,493,494,496 20.00 per course 

Music Fees — Private lessons for other than full-time music majors and for music majors 

taking private lessons not required for the degree being pursued: 

Each semester hour per instructor 35.00 

Orchestral or Band Instrument rental 10.00 per semester 

Honors College 

Fee for binding thesis 6.00 each copy 

Reading Center, Individual Remedial Instructions: 

Special Students (non-credit) 40.00 per semester 

Complete Reading Diagnosis 35.00 with written report 

Re-evaluation 5.00 

Speech and Hearing Clinic Services: 

Speech and Language Evaluation 40.00 each 

Speech and Language Therapy (Individual) 

2 fifty-minute sessions per week 3 12.00 per semester 

3 fifty-minute sessions per week 468.00 per semester 

Speech and Language Therapy (Group) 

2 fifty-minute sessions per week 156.00 per semester 

3 fifty-minute sessions per week 234.00 per semester 

Language Group 25.00 per month 

Audiometric-Complete except for special tests 25.00 per hour 

Hearing Aid Evaluation 25.00 per hour 

Impedance Tests 25.00 per hour 

Special Tests 25.00 per hour 

Ear Mold Impressions 9.50 each 

Lipreading/Auditory Training 12.00 per hour 

ENG Testing 65.00 each 

Examinations and Graduation: 

Challenge Examination 10.00 

Revalidation Examination 30.00 when applicable 

Special Examination 3.00 when applicable 

Graduation Fee-Bachelor** 15.00 with application 

for degree 

Certificate 2.75 when applicable 

Continuing Education and Public Service 
Off-Campus Center 

Undergraduate Course 3 1 .00 per semester hour 

Graduate Course 37.00 per semester hour 

Resident Center — laboratory fee 6.00 per course 

Resident Center— typing fee 5.00 per course 

Extension Center 

Undergraduate Course 3 1 .00 per semester hour 

Graduate Course 37.00 per semester hour 

Independent Study Courses 25.00 per semester hour 

High School Independent Study Course 35.00 per half unit 

Registration and Records: 

Change of Schedule 5.00 when applicable 

Cooperative Education Program 25.00 when applicable 

Late Registration 10.00 

Evaluation Fee for Foreign Students 

(Non-refundable) 10.00 with application 

Memorandum of Credits .50 each 

Transcript of Credits 1 .00 when applicable 

Special fees are not normally refundable. However, requests for refunds of special fees will 
be based on circumstances existing at the times of requests. 



34/General Information 



STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 



The following information is a summary of the financial aid program. For further in- 
formation and application forms, write to: 
Director of Financial Aid 
University of Southern Mississippi 
Southern Station, Box 5101 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 

Steps to Take in Obtaining Financial Aid 

1. Since financial aid is awarded only to students who satisfactorily complete the re- 
quirements for admission to the University, it is necessary that new students have the 
following items on file in the Office of Admissions and Records. 

a. Admissions application (Entering Freshmen & Transfers) 

b. ACT examination score (Entering Freshmen only) 

c. College transcript showing previous college credit (Transfer students only) 

2. Submit the American College Testing Program FAMILY FINANCIAL STATE- 
MENT. (All students including those applying for academic scholarships should complete 
this statement.) Forms may be obtained from a high school guidance office or upon request 
from the USM Financial Aid Office. 

3. Complete the application for Student Assistance to attend the University of 
Southern Mississippi. The application will be considered for the following types of aid: 

Basic Educational Opportunity Grant 

National Direct Student Loan 

Nursing Student Loan 

Nursing Scholarship 

College Work-Study 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant 

Academic Scholarships 



APPLICATION DEADLINES 

New students, currently enrolled students, graduate students, and transfers must sub- 
mit the application and the ACT financial statement by March 15 to receive full considera- 
tion. Late applications will be accepted and considered if funds permit. 

TYPE OF FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS AVAILABLE 

The Financial Aid Office has the responsibility of administering major areas of finan- 
cial assistance. These areas will be listed in three categories-loans, grants and scholarships, 
and student employment. Space will not permit description of each program in detail. Fur- 
ther information may be obtained by contacting the Financial Aid Office. 

A. LOANS 

1. National Direct (Defense) Student Loan Program (NDSL) 

The National Direct Student Loan Program is for students who are 
enrolled at least half-time in a participation post-secondary institution and 
who need a loan to meet their educational expenses. 

Students may borrow up to a total of: (a) $2,500 if they are enrolled in 
a vocational program or if they have completed less than two years of a 
program leading to a bachelor's degree: (b) $5,000 if an undergraduate stu- 
dent has already completed two years of study toward a bachelor's degree. 
(This total includes any amount borrowed under NDSL for the first two 
years of study): (c) $10,000 for graduate study. (This total includes any 
amount borrowed under NDSL for undergraduate study.) 

Repayment begins nine months after graduation or leaving school for 



Financial Aid/35 

other reasons. Students may be allowed up to ten (10) years to pay back the 
loan. During the repayment period three (3) percent interest is charged on 
unpaid balance of the loan principal. 

No payments are required for up to three years while serving in the 
Armed Forces, Peace Corps, or VISTA. 

There are loan cancellation provisions for borrowers who go into certain 
fields of teaching or specified military duty. 

2. Nursing Student Loans 

The Nursing Student Loan Program is intended to assist students in 
achieving careers in nursing by providing long-term, low-interest loans to help 
meet the costs of education. Students must be enrolled at least half-time in 
the School of Nursing. Depending on financial need, nursing students may 
borrow up to $2,500 per academic year. The total amount of a student's 
loan for all years may not exceed $10,000. 

Repayment of the loan plus interest at three percent begins nine (9) 
months after the recipient ceases to be at least a half-time student. Cancella- 
tion of up to 85 percent of the loan is available to those who are employed 
full-time as registered nurses in a public or non-profit private agency, institu- 
tion, or organization. 

3. Law Enforcement Loan (LEEP) 

The LEEP Loan is available to full-time students pursuing a baccalaureate or 
graduate degree in Criminal Justice. The loan provides payments for tuition and 
fees. Loans of up to $2,200 per academic year are available to students who are on 
full academic leave from a qualifying public law enforcement agency and who 
demonstrate financial need. Applicants must indicate an intention to pursue, 
resume, or continue full-time employment in a publicly-funded local, state, or 
federal law enforcement agency upon completion of their studies. 

Cancellation of up to 100 percent of the loan is available to persons who enter 
the Criminal Justice field upon graduation. Otherwise, repayment of the loan, plus 
interest at seven (7) percent will begin nine (9) months following termination of full- 
time student enrollment. 

4. Federally Insured Student Loan (FISL) 

The Federally Insured Student Loan Program enables students to borrow 
directly from lenders in order to finance educational expenses. While the bulk of 
these loans are made by commercial lenders, some states and educational institu- 
tions also are lenders. The loans are insured by the Federal Government or 
guaranteed by a state or private nonprofit guarantee agency. 

Students must be enrolled, in good standing, and making satisfactory 
progress — or have been accepted for enrollment — at least half-time in an eligible col- 
lege, university, or professional school, or an eligible vocational, technical, trade, 
business, or home study school. 

The maximum a student may borrow as an undergraduate is $2,500 per 
academic year. Graduate and professional students may borrow up to $5,000 per 
academic year. (In some states the maximum amount is less.) The total that may be 
borrowed for undergraduate or vocational study is $7,500. The total for graduate 
and professional students is $15,000, including any amount borrowed for 
undergraduate study. 

Graduate students enrolled in health professions schools located in the United 
States may borrow larger amounts for study during the 1980-81 academic year. 
Those in schools of medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, veterinary medicine, op- 
tometry, podistry, and public health may borrow up to $10,000 and pharmacy 
students up to $7,500. Total loans still may not exceed $15,000. 

The interest rate is seven (7) percent, and the Federal Government will pay the 
interest until repayment of the loan begins. 

The Loan Must Be Repaid. The loans may be cancelled in certain extreme in- 
stances such as the death of the student borrower, but there are no other means of 
loan cancellation such as teaching in certain fields or service in health professions 
shortage areas. Payments normally begin between nine (9) and (12) months after 
graduation or when the borrower ceases to be at least a half-time student, and 



36/General Information 

students may be allowed to take up to ten (10) years to repay the loan. In most cases 
students must pay at least $360 a year unless circumstances as agreed upon with the 
lending institution warrant a lesser amount. The student may defer repayment for 
up to three years while serving in the Armed Forces, Peace Corps, or as a fulltime 
volunteer under the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973 and for up to one year 
while actively seeking but not finding full-time employment. Repayment may also be 
deferred if the student borrower returns to school full-time at an eligible institution 
or is pursuing a course of study in certain approved graduate fellowships. 

B. GRANTS 

1. Basic Educational Opportunity Grants. (Basic Grants) 

The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program makes funds available 
to eligible students attending approved colleges, community/junior colleges, 
vocational schools, technical institutes, hospital schools of nursing, and other 
post-high school institutions. 

Students may apply for a Basic Grant if they are undergraduate students 
enrolled on at least a half-time basis in an eligible program. 

Students can apply for a Basic Grant by completing one of several dif- 
ferent forms. The USM Financial Aid Office uses the American College 
Testing Program to determine eligibility. The forms are available at high 
schools and post-high school institutions. Within six (6) weeks of submitting 
the form, the student will be notified as to whether or not he is eligible. 

He then submits the Notification to the school which will calculate the 
amount of the Basic Grant he is eligible to receive. The amount of the 
award is based on the determination of eligibility and the cost of attendance 
at the school. The grants range from $200 to $1800. 

2. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) 

The Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program is for students of 
exceptional financial need who, without the grant, would be unable to continue their 
education. 

Students must be enrolled at least half-time as an undergraduate or vocational 
student in an educational institution participating in the program. Graduate 
students are not eligible. 

An SEOG cannot be less than $200 or more than $1,500 a year. Normally, an 
SEOG may be received for up to four years. The total that may be awarded is $4,000 
for a four-year course of study. The educational institution must provide the student 
with additional financial assistance at least equal to the amount of the grant. 

3. Nursing Scholarship Program. (NS) 

The Nursing Scholarship Program is intended to assist students of exceptional 
financial need enrolled at least half-time in the School of Nursing. Depending on the 
financial need, students may receive up to $2,000 for an academic year. 

4. Law Enforcement Grant 

The Law Enforcement Educational Program (LEEP) Grant is restricted to in- 
service law enforcement officers of local or state units of governments. Eligible 
students may enroll for full-time or part-time study in courses leading toward an 
eligible baccalaureate or graduate degree. 

The Grant Program provides payment for tuition and fees. Students receiving 
the grant must agree to remain employed in public law enforcement for two years 
following the completion of any course of study funded by the grant. Recipients not 
meeting this requirement must repay their grants plus seven (7) percent interest. 

5. State Student Incentive Grant (SSIG) 

The State of Mississippi through a matching grant program with the Federal 
Government and the University of Southern Mississippi provides grants to full-time 
undergraduate students who are residents of the State of Mississippi. Recipients 
must demonstrate substantial financial need and show academic promise. Grants 
may range from $200 to $1 ,500 per academic year. Selection of recipients is made by 
the Financial Aid Office. 



Student Employment/37 

6. University Scholarships 

a. Freshman: Two Achievement Scholarship Programs are available to entering 
freshmen each year. 

1. Presidential Scholars: Four Presidential Scholars shall be selected by the Presi- 
dent of the University of Southern Mississippi. Applicants for this scholarship 
should have superior ACT scores, a high school grade point average of at least 
3.5 on a 4.0 system and have demonstrated leadership ability. The application 
shall be postmarked no later than March 15. Recipients must enter the Honors 
College. The value of this award is $2,120 per year for a four-year period. (The 
recipient will receive increments of $1,060 at registration each semester.) Ap- 
plications can be obtained by writing: Honors College, Box 5162, Southern Sta- 
tion, Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 . 

2. University Scholars: Forty-six (46) University Scholars shall be named each year. 
Applicants for this award should have minimum ACT scores of 28 to 36, a high 
school grade point average of 3.5 or above and have demonstrated leadership 
ability. The application shall be postmarked no later than March 15. Recipients 
shall enter the Honors College. The value of the award is $350 per year for four 
years for a total of $1,400. The recipient will receive increments of $175 at 
registration each semester. Applications can be obtained by writing Honors Col- 
lege, Box 5162, Southern Station, Hattiesburg, Ms. 39401 

b. Upperclass General Academic Scholarships: Scholarships are available each year 
to upperclass students based upon general academic achievement, leadership, 
major field of study, financial need, and other stipulations which may be impos- 
ed by the donor. Applications must be made each academic year for these 
scholarships. The value of these awards range from $100 to $1,000 per academic 
year. Applications can be obtained by writing the Director of Financial Aid, Box 
5 101 , Southern Station, Hattiesburg, Ms. 39401 . 

c. Phi Theta Kappa Scholarships: Members of Phi Theta Kappa from any 
Mississippi junior college shall be awarded a $200 scholarship. The recipient will 
receive increments of $100 per term for the first two semesters at the University. 
Applications may be obtained by writing Director of High School and Junior 
College Relations, Box 501 1, Southern Station, Hattiesburg, Ms. 39401 . 

d. Regional Scholarships: A limited number of awards are available to non- 
residents of the State of Mississippi. This scholarship represents a waiver of non- 
resident fees only. These awards are based upon academic record, ACT test 
scores, and citizenship record. Applications may be obtained by writing, Direc- 
tor of Financial Aid, Box 5101, Southern Station, Hattiesburg, Ms. 39401. 
March 1 5th is the priority date for applications. 

e. Service Scholarships: These scholarships are available in athletics, band, music, 
etc. Service scholarships are based upon skill and performance in such endeavors 
as music and athletic ability. Applications can be obtained by writing: Band and 
Music, Dean, College of Fine Arts, Box 5031, Southern Station; for Athletic 
scholarships write Athletic Director, Southern Station, Box 5017, Hattiesburg, 
Ms. 39401. 

C. STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

1. College Work-Study Program 

The College Work-Study Program is authorized under Title IV of the 
Higher Education Act of 1965. The primary purpose of the College Work- 
Study program is to stimulate and promote part-time employment for 
students. The program is designed for these students who are in need of 
earnings to pursue their course of study at USM. Primary consideration is 
given to students with the greatest financial need. 

2. Student Employment On Campus 

The University employs students who are not eligible to receive the 
federal financial aid programs. Applications are accepted year-round and are 
considered as student employment vacancies occur. Contact the Student 
Employment Office, McLemore Hall, for applications and additional informa- 
tion. 



38/General Information 

3. Student Employment Off Campus 

Employment positions are available to many students in Hattiesburg and 
the surrounding community. The Office of Student Employment collects ap- 
plications for work off campus. Referrals are made as requests are received 
from off-campus agencies. 



FINANCIAL AID POLICIES 

1. In determining need, the Financial Aid Office will use the financial need analysis 
systems of the American College Testing Program. The applicant's need for financial 
assistance must be established by filing the appropriate applications for financial 
assistance. Students applying for need-based academic awards must also complete the 
financial statement to be considered. 

2. Financial aid is awarded on an academic year basis (September to August). Ap- 
plicants must file an application and a financial statement each academic year to continue 
any type of financial assistance. 

3. In awarding financial aid funds, primary consideration is given to an applicant's 
demonstrated financial need. Consideration is also given to evidence of an applicant's 
potential to achieve or maintain normal academic progress at USM. 

4. Any financial aid commitment involving the use of federal funds is tentative and 
conditional upon subsequent Congressional appropriation and actual receipt of the funds 
by the University of Southern Mississippi. 

5. The Financial Aid Office reserves the right on behalf of the University to review 
and cancel an award at any time because of changes in the student's financial or academic 
status, changes of curriculum, or the student's involvement in student unrest as defined by 
the Public Laws 91-204, 91-557, 90-575, Sections 407, 41 1 , and 504 (a). 

6. During the award year an applicant who is placed on academic probation may re- 
tain his financial aid award (except selected scholarship aid) as long as he is permitted to 
register for each succeeding term of the award year. If a student is suspended from the 
University for academic reasons, he is ineligible to receive aid the first term he returns. 

7. The applicant's personal and leadership qualities will be evaluated. A student 
dismissed from the University for disciplinary reasons shall have his financial aid ter- 
minated immediately and for an indefinite period. The student may appeal to the Financial 
Aid Committee to reinstate his financial aid after the first term he returns to the University. 

8. In awarding financial aid, priority will be given to currently enrolled renewal ap- 
plicants who apply before the March 15th priority date. 

9. Priority will be given all student applicants for financial aid accepted for admis- 
sion or enrolled as full-time students (minimum of twelve (12) semester hours for 
undergraduates and nine (9) semester hours for graduate students). If a student drops 
below the minimum number of hours to be classified as a full-time student, he is required to 
report any change to the Financial Aid Office. The Financial Aid Office may require that 
he repay a portion of the aid he has received for that term. Failure to do so could result in 
the cancellation of his financial aid program. 

10. Several scholarship programs require the applicant to maintain a specified grade 
point average. The scholarship recipient will be notified of the approved grade point 
average that must be maintained at the time the award is made. 

11. Students who withdraw during a semester must notify the Financial Aid Office. 
Students who withdraw before completing a semester may be expected to repay the entire 
award at the time of withdrawal. If the student is entitled to a refund, the refund shall first 
be credited to the student aid account from which the student received assistance. 

12. The National Direct Student Loan and the Nursing Student Loan Programs re- 
quire repayment; therefore, each student borrower must schedule a terminal interview with 
the University Bursar prior to withdrawal or graduation. 

13. Normally the financial aid award will be disbursed in equal payments at the time 
of registration. The applicant receiving an employment award will receive wages bi-weekly. 

14. The University reserves the right to release to the United States Office of Educa- 
tion, state agencies, scholarship donors, and University scholarship selection committees 
any information requested pertinent to this application, i.e., enrollment status, address, 
grade point average, and financial need. 



Financial Aid Retention/39 

15. The University reserves the right to release all public announcements concerning 
scholarship winners; however, the amount of the stipend will be kept confidential. 

GUIDELINES FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

As the number of married students attending the University increases, it is necessary 
for the University to provide facts about educational and living costs and to suggest 
methods of meeting these costs. The financial situation of married students is completely 
different from that of a single student. Their expenses are obviously higher, but they may 
also have more substantial resources; therefore, they need to have a different approach in 
meeting their educational and living expenses while attending the University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

One of the most practical and popular ways of financing marriage and education is to 
have one spouse attend school while the other works full-time. In this way, the employed 
spouse can meet the bulk of the married student's living costs as shown in the University of 
Southern Mississippi Student Budgets. As a general rule the University cannot totally sup- 
port both husband and wife as students. 

A student applicant should recognize that marriage does not, in and of itself, classify 
him as an independent student. Students married less than 18 months may be considered as 
dependent upon their parents. If parents have been providing financial support, the student 
marriage should not significantly affect the parents' ability to assist the student. Therefore, 
in cases where the student does not meet all three requirements for independency, parents 
of the student will be required to submit income and asset information on the ACT Family 
Financial Statement in addition to the income information of the student and spouse. 



FINANCIAL AID RETENTION POLICIES 

1. The Financial Aid Office strictly adheres to the academic standards as presently 
established by the University and outlined in this Bulletin. 

2. Students who do not achieve the prescribed academic standards and are 
academically suspended shall be ineligible to receive aid the first semester that they are per- 
mitted to return to school. If, after that first semester, they show academic improvement, 
they may reapply to the Financial Aid Office to have their financial aid reinstated. 

3. Students who fail all of their courses in any semester and are academically suspend- 
ed from the University shall be ineligible to receive financial aid the first semester that they 
are permitted to re-enroll. If, after that first semester, their grades show improvement, they 
may reapply to the Financial Aid Office to have their aid re-instated. 

4. Students who enroll and receive financial assistance as full-time students shall be re- 
quired to maintain their full-time status. 

5. Students who enroll and receive financial assistance as a full-time student but then 
drop below full-time status shall be required to repay to the student aid account from which 
they received aid, a prorata share of assistance received. 

6. Students who change their enrollment status from full-time to part-time status 
because of medical reasons shall be exempted from repayment. The nature of the medical 
problem must be submitted to the Aid Office in writing at the time of withdrawal from 
classes. 

7. Students who change enrollment status and withdraw from classes for other than 
medical reasons may appeal to the Financial Aid Committee for a waiver of repayment. 
Appeals should be in writing and submitted to the Director of Financial Aid prior to the 
end of the semester in which the changes occur. Appeals will be decided by the Financial 
Aid Committee. 

8. Students who withdraw from all their classes during a semester in which they receiv- 
ed financial assistance shall be expected to repay the total amount of aid received, excluding 
college work-study earnings. This money must be repaid before the student will be allowed 
to enroll for the succeeding academic term. Exceptions will be made for the students 
withdrawing for medical reasons. All other exceptions must be approved by the Financial 
Aid Committee. 



40/General Information 

GUARANTEED STUDENT LOAN DISBURSEMENT POLICIES 

In an attempt to assure the United States Federal Government and other Guaranteeing 
Agencies, the U.S. Commissioner of Education, lending agencies, the University of 
Southern Mississippi and student borrowers, that Guaranteed Student Loan proceeds are 
utilized for the purpose intended, checks representing the proceeds of these loans and nam- 
ing the University of Southern Mississippi as a "joint endorser" shall be handled in the 
following manner: 

A. Federally Insured Student Loan Program 

1. Upon endorsement by the student payee and the University of Southern 
Mississippi, the funds will be deposited in the "student depository" and 
disbursed to the student by the University Business Office in equal amounts 
proportionate to the loan period represented by the check. 

2. Of the funds for one semester or term, loan proceeds will first be applied to 
the student's fees payable to the University, including tuition, room and 
board, Pinehaven rent, and any and all other current fees and/or past due 
fees. When the loan proceeds for a current term exceed current and past due 
fees, the balance shall be paid directly to the student. 

B. State Agencies and Other Guarantee Agencies 

1. Upon endorsement by the student payee and the University of Southern 
Mississippi, the University shall first deduct any and all current and past due 
fees. Next, and at the time the check is transacted, the student shall be re- 
quired to deposit with the University an amount which will pay the student's 
educational expenses for and during the remaining loan period represented by 
the check. Educational expenses for the remaining period will be considered 
to be under the same circumstances as at the time the check is transacted. 
When the loan proceeds exceed these educational costs, the balance shall be 
paid directly to the student. 
Any funds remaining on deposit due the student's withdrawal from the University or 
failure to reenroll during the loan period, or funds reimbursable due to the student's 
withdrawal during a term will be returned to the lender from which the student loan was ob- 
tained. 



ROTC SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

See Military Science and Aerospace Studies sections for scholarship information. 

MARINE OFFICER PROGRAMS 

Qualified students may apply for an officer program leading to a commission as a Se- 
cond Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps. Commissions are offered in both 
ground and aviation components. The Platoon Leaders Course (PLC) is offered to 
freshmen, sophomores, and juniors who attend precommissioning training during the sum- 
mer. Financial assistance and Flight Indoctrination Programs are available. Qualified 
seniors attend twelve weeks of training in the Officer Candidate Course (OCC) after 
graduation. For details, contact the Placement Officer or the Marine Officer Selection Of- 
ficer when he is on campus. 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI FOUNDATION 

The University of Southern Mississippi Foundation is a Mississippi corporation whose 
sole purpose is to receive and manage gifts, contributions, and donations to the University 
of Southern Mississippi for educational purposes. It provides a centralized receptacle for 
receiving gifts of any nature to the University, handling these in a manner prescribed by the 
donor or in accordance with good business judgment, and making the gifts work for the 



Scholarships/41 

growth and development of Southern. The Foundation is managed by a Board of Directors 
composed of former students and friends of the University. 

The Foundation Charter was so drawn that assistance could be given to any area of 
development at Southern so long as it is used for educational purposes. Some of the long- 
range plans include: sponsoring research, sponsoring faculty chairs, supplementing faculty 
salaries, aiding the library, providing special equipment, making possible achievement 
awards for faculty and students, providing fellowships and scholarships, and contributing 
to the building of the physical plant. 

During the early years of the Foundation, emphasis will be placed on securing scholar- 
ship funds. This is considered to be one of the greatest needs at the present time. The Foun- 
dation solicits the funds, but the awards are made by the University Scholarship Commit- 
tee. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE FOUNDATION 

Accounting Achievement Endowment — Scholarships to recognize achievement by ac- 
counting majors and other activities for the benefit of the School of Profes- 
sional Accountancy. 

Reynolds T. Alonzo, Sr., Loan Fund— To assist students to continue their college 
education. 

American Legion Post 139, Bay St. Louis— Scholarships for worthy undergraduate 
students who maintain C or better average with preference given to children 
of Post members who reside in Hancock County. 

American Tung Growers Loan Fund — Provides rotating loans for junior, senior, 
and graduate students majoring in Polymer Science. 

Associated General Contractors Scholarship of Mississippi Incorporated — Provides 
scholarships for the building construction technology program in the College 
of Science and Technology. 

Oliver V. Austin — Deserving, undergraduate major in science. 

Mr. and Mrs. Matt B. Bankston— Capable and deserving student residing in South 
Mississippi in need of financial assistance. 

Carrie Norton Herring Bennett — Fellowship to be awarded to a graduate student in 
the School of Home Economics upon the recommendation of the faculty of 
that School. Recipients must pay at least half of the sum received within two 
years of graduation or last attendance. 

R. G. Bigelow — High academic, junior, senior, or graduate student who plans to 
teach. 

S. H. Blair Scholarship — Awarded to any qualified student at USM who graduated 
from the Hattiesburg Public School System, in need of financial assistance, 
who is enrolled in the area of School Administration or the area of Physical 
Education showing a preference for the coaching field — other than scholar- 
ship athletes. 

B.P.O. Elks Lodge 599, Hattiesburg — Awarded to a capable and deserving student from 
Forrest, Jones, Perry, Lamar, Covington or Marion County. 

Kathy Brown— Sponsored by Pen and Sword— Funds from this endowment program shall 
be awarded to: 1 — Active military personnel or dependents of former USM 
Bootstrappers; 2 — Dependents of military personnel; or 3 — Other eligibles. 

Century Club — Scholarships for athletes. 

Citizens Bank, Columbia — Capable and deserving Marion County student. 

Citizens Bank of Hattiesburg — Capable and deserving student with preference given to 
Forrest County and/or Mississippi. 

Kent Collins Memorial Football Scholarship 

William M. Colmer American Studies Scholarship — Recommendations will be made from 
American Studies Committee, Chairman of Department of Political Science, and 
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts for students in American Studies who 
demonstrate the ideals which Mr. Colmer held in love, loyalty, patriotism to his 
country. 

Commercial National Bank and Trust Company, Laurel — Capable and deserving Jones 
County student. 



42/General Information 

Ben F. Courtney — Native of Forrest County, business administration major, and in need of 
financial aid. 

Betty Dukes Craft — Sponsored by Forrest County Home Economics Alumnae and James 
K. Dukes, brother of Betty Dukes Craft. Outstanding student in Home Economics. 

Will H. Davis Real Estate Scholarship — Awarded to a capable and deserving student upon 
recommendation from real estate area. 

Debate Squad Scholarships— Ranging from $50 to $100 per semester to students par- 
ticipating in the USM Intercollegiate Debate Program. Awards based on debate 
capability on recommendation of the Director of Forensics. 

Horace Dickerson — Loan to be awarded to a person on master's level in guidance and 
counseling or a related field; funds to be repaid after graduation. 

Distinguished Professor Award — Presented in the name of the Distinguished Professor of 
the Year in the same discipline. 

Faulkner Concrete Pipe Company, Hattiesburg — Merit and need. 

First Guaranty Savings and Loan Association — Junior or senior majoring in Accounting, 
Marketing, Finance, or Real Estate who resides in Forrest, Harrison, Pike,, Cov- 
ington, Pearl River, Jeff Davis, or Lamar County. 

First Magnolia Federal Savings and Loan — Economics or Finance. 

First Federal Savings and Loan Association, Pascagoula-Moss point — Capable and deserv- 
ing Jackson County student. 

First Mississippi National Bank, Hattiesburg— Best interest of the University with 
preference to surrounding area students. Economic need is a factor. Ten awarded. 

First National Bank of Laurel — Awarded to a resident of Covington, Jasper, Jones, Perry, 
Smith, or Wayne County. • 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Y. Foote Endowment — Best interest of the University with economic need 
a factor. 

Forrest County Alumni Chapter — Capable and deserving Forrest County students. 

Bertha M. Fritzsche Graduate Fellowship — Outstanding student in Home Economics. 

Austin Edward and Maude M. Gordon — Capable and deserving student in Nursing. 

Katherine L. Guice Memorial Social Work Scholarship — Awarded to a capable and deserv- 
ing student in Social Work upon the recommendation from the faculty in that area. 

Gulf National Bank, Gulfport — Hancock or Harrison County student with B average in 
high school with financial need. 

Gymnastic Sports Club— Capable and deserving student in this area. 

Lester Haddox — Worthy and promising student from Marion, Amite, Lincoln, Pike, or 
Walthall County. 

Clifford H. and Dr. Sarah L. Hagenson — To be awarded to a student majoring in Early 
Childhood Education upon recommendation by College of Education and 
Psychology. 

Hancock Bank, Gulfport — Junior or senior student residing in Handock or Harrison 
County, majoring in Business Administration 

Harrison County Alumni Chapter — Capable and deserving Harrison County students. 

W. B. Harlan Memorial — Economic need, male student in Business Administration. 

Hercules, Incorporated — Scholarships to be awarded to financially needy students in the 
College of Science and Technology beyond the sophomore year upon the advice of 
the dean; at least one to be awarded to a member of a minority race. 

Fern R. Hesson— Scholarship for worthy undergraduate student in the field of School 
Food Services. 

Alma Hickman — Capable and needy student. 

Jones County Alumni Chapter— Capable and deserving Jones County students; preference 
given to junior or senior students. 

Junior Panhellenic Council — Scholarships for outstanding sorority women. 

Eleanor and J. B. Kirkland— Provide scholarship assistance to capable and deserving 
students. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Kirkland Endowed Scholarship— Established in memory of their 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Tyson Brewster and Mr. and Mrs. Elijah Thomas 
Kirkland; to be awarded to capable and deserving students in need of financial 
assistance. 

Selma Krell Endowed— Students in the Department of Theatre Arts. 



Scholarships/43 

Ethel Whatley Kroker — Awarded to capable and deserving students with preference given 
to blood relatives, according to ability and financial need. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Lewis Endowment — Scholarship to be awarded on the basis of citizen- 
ship record, economic need, academic work, and Mississippian. 

L & A Contracting Company — Capable and deserving student. 

Lamar County Alumni Chapter — Capable and needy Lamar County student. 

Laurel Federal Savings and Loan Association — To be awarded to a student majoring in 
Finance, Economics, or Business Administration who resides in Jones, Wayne, 
Jasper, Covington, Smith, Simpson, or Perry County who needs financial 
assistance. 

Lanelle Gaddis Long Home Economics — Capable and deserving student in this area. 

Carl L. McQuagge Memorial — Awarded to a person planning to teach school. 

Raymond Mannoni — Students majoring in the College of Fine Arts on merit basis. 

Marion County Alumni Chapter — Honoring Doyle M. Coats and Miss Chrystelle Ford; to 
be presented to an outstanding Marion County student. 

Medical Technology — Majors in this area. 

Morrison Incorporated — Capable and deserving student. 

William Walter Munson Memorial — Worthy boys and girls who are enrolled as regular 
students. 

Nursing Scholarships — Capable and deserving students majoring in Nursing. 

George Robert Olliphant Memorial — Scholarships for needy and deserving students from 
Mississippi with preference to Enterprise or to Clarke County. 

Paint Research Institute — Graduate fellowship in Chemistry. 

Peck Oil Company — Capable and deserving Forrest County student. 

Phi Kappa Phi — Awarded to an outstanding student upon the recommendation of Phi 
Kappa Phi. 

Pine Belt Savings and Loan Association — Capable and deserving student who resides in the 
area of operations of the association in the College of Business Administration. 

Pi Omega Pi — Outstanding student in Business Education. 

Mary W. Pulley, Mr. and Mrs. James L. Pulley, and Mrs. Jessie P. Gough Memorial En- 
dowed Scholarships — To help worthy students in the ongoing of their education. 

M. M. Roberts — Capable and deserving undergraduate student who is a Mississippian. 

Tom Pevey Memorial Award — Sponsored by Hattiesburg Lion's Club for Speech and 
Hearing Science majors. 

Mrs. Lula Beverly Praytor Sartin — Awarded to a worthy boy or girl who needs help to 
complete his/her college education. 

School for Children with Learning Disabilities, Memory of Mr. and Mrs. John Hines 
Howie — Scholarships for prospective teachers in this area. 

School of Social Work Fellowship — Awarded to those in this School. 

Star-Herald Scholarship — To be awarded to a needy student in Journalism upon recom- 
mendation of Journalism faculty. 

W. W. Stout Memorial — Creative student majoring in English. 

Study Abroad — To assist students in their Studies Abroad Program sponsored by the 
Foreign Language Department. 

Emmett V. Thomas — Capable and deserving students. 

John D. Thomas Family Home Economics — Capable and worthy student majoring in 
Home Economics. 

John D. Thomas Family Music Scholarship — Music majors, sophomore or advanced stan- 
ding, good academic average, Baptist, financial need. Sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. 
John D. Thomas, Hattiesburg. 

William A. Thomson — Capable and deserving student in the Hattiesburg area. 

Douglas A. Traweek — Senior student with preference given to Clarke County. 

Unifirst Federal Savings and Loan Association — Awarded to a capable and deserving stu- 
dent in need of financial assistance. 

B. O. Van Hook Golf Scholarship — Scholarships for outstanding members of the golf 
team. 

J. Fred Walker — Awarded to an outstanding student in Biology or pre-med each year. 



44/General Information 

Ivah O. Wilber Panhellenic Scholarship — To be awarded annually to a sorority woman 
upon recommendation of the Dean of Students (Women), the Panhellenic Adviser, 
and the Panhellenic Council in memory of the former Dean of Women and 
Panhellenic Adviser. 

John Everett Williams Memorial— Sponsored by Jackson County Alumni Chapter- 
Outstanding students from Jackson County 

WVMI-WQID Scholarship — Capable and deserving student in the communications field 
with preference to radio. 

Willie C. Wyatt Memorial Music Loan — Awarded to a music major. To be repaid within 
three years of graduation or last attendance at no interest. 

Mrs. Edna Daves Yarbrough Endowed Scholarship — To be awarded on the basistof evident 
Christian dedication, belief in God and the Christian faith, application or ability to 
opportunity and evidence of definite need, good moral character and a high respect 
for the United States Government. 

1958 Class Endowment — Capable and needy student. 

1959 Class Endowment — Capable and needy student. 

1960 Class Endowment — Capable and needy student. 

1961 Class Endowment — Capable and needy student. 

1962 Class Endowment — Capable and needy student. 
Scholarship Fund of the Sixties— Capable and needy student. 



UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SERVICES 

Library functions at the University of Southern Mississippi are organized into three 
major units: the Joseph Anderson Cook Memorial Library, the William David McCain 
Graduate Library, and the Teaching-Learning Resources Center. Each unit is administered 
by a director who reports to the Dean of the School of Library Service. In addition to serv- 
ing as the academic dean to these directors, the Dean of the School of Library Service also 
has primary responsibility for the academic program of professional education in librarian- 
ship. Thus, the School of Library Service unites University libraries and related instruc- 
tional faculty into one administrative structure. 

The Joseph Anderson Cook Memorial Library 

The Joseph Anderson Cook Memorial Library contains the principal collections of 
books, microforms, and other printed materials which directly support the instructional 
program of the University at all levels. The building is a modern, two story structure which 
is fire-proof and air-conditioned. Being of modular construction, the building readily lends 
itself to readjustments in the shelving of materials as holdings increase. Book stacks and 
reading areas are intermingled throughout the building, and the open shelf method of ac- 
cess to materials is utlized. The Cook Library is currently acquisitioning over 30,000 
volumes annually, along with 2,000 journals and extensive microform holdings. On 
February 1, 1974, the Cook Library converted from the Dewey Decimal Classification 
System to that of the Library of Congress. Reclassification from Dewey to Library of Con- 
gress is proceeding as rapidly as possible. Until reclassification is complete, however, it will 
be necessary to maintain two shelving systems. 

The William David McCain Graduate Library 

The William David McCain Library, which opened in 1976, contains the University's 
special collections of manuscripts, books, and memorabilia and the University Archives. 
These collections are maintained primarily to support research in selected areas. Among the 
special collections, the following holdings are the most prominent: Mississippian, the de 
Grummond Children's Literature Collections, the Woods Collection of rare books, and the 
papers of William M. Colmer and Theodore G. Bilbo. 

The Teaching-Learning Resources Center 

Students are provided access to non-print media through the Learning-Resources 
Center located in Room 107 on the ground floor of the McCain Library. The Center con- 



Alumni Association/45 

tains study carrels for individualized, self-paced learning. These carrels are equipped with a 
variety of audio-visual devices including audio cassette players, videocassette players, slide 
projectors, filmstrip projectors, and motion picture projectors. The non-print media collec- 
tion contains material from a variety of subjects and is supplemented by materials placed 
on reserve in the Center by faculty members. The Teaching-Learning Resources Center also 
provides a wide range of services to faculty members in order to assist them in maintaining 
a high level of instructional quality for students enrolled at the University of Southern 
Mississippi. 



THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE 

The Institute was founded in 1947 for the purpose of teaching an intensive English 
course to the foreign student who desired to learn or improve his/her knowledge of the 
language. Among those who study at the English Language Institute are professionals, 
non-professionals, and students. Anyone between ages 15 to 70 may be a student. 

There are four levels of study at the English Language Institute. Classes with emphasis 
in English grammar, vocabulary, writing, and reading are offered at every level, although 
the exact program varies slightly with a student's needs as he progresses. More advanced 
students have the opportunity to choose part of their program of study. Experienced in- 
structors, many with advanced degrees, offer a variety of teaching techniques. The average 
class size is ten students. 

In addition to class instruction, there are two language laboratories, one monitored for 
assigned classes and the other open to students who desire to improve their listening com- 
prehension on an independent basis. There is also a conversational tutor program which of- 
fers students an opportunity to use English informally with a native speaker. Activities, 
such as homestays and professional visits, are organized for those students who are in- 
terested. 

Classification tests, given on the first day of registration, determine the placement of a 
student. Progression from one level to another is based on a graded series of achievement 
tests and on faculty approval. A certain level of proficiency must be attained before the stu- 
dent progresses. The Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency is given at the end of 
each session to levels III and IV. In conjunction with this test, ELI also offers a composi- 
tion test and a fluency test to indicate a student's active language proficiency. 

The English Language Institute, as a part of the University of Southern Mississippi, is 
authorized under Federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students. Applicants are re- 
quired to complete all items on the application form. Upon receipt and approval of the stu- 
dent's application, the director will mail a certificate of eligibility (Form 1-20) which will 
enable him/her to apply for a Student Visa at the nearest United States Consulate. (In- 
formation concerning travel to the U.S. may be obtained from airline offices in the respec- 
tive countries.) 

For further information, write to: 
The Director 

English Language Institute 
Southern Station Box 5065 
University of Southern Mississippi 
Hattiesburg, Ms 39401 
U.S.A. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association has been in existence since 1917. During the early years its 
chief function was related to placement service. Beginning with the session of 1945-1946, 
the organization experienced a rebirth. Recognizing the fact that a working alumni associa- 
tion is vital to the development of the institution, the Executive Committee began the 
organization of alumni groups in the various counties of the state. On July 1, 1953, a full- 
time executive secretary was employed. 

The Association publishes the ALUMNI NEWS magazine four times a year. Active 
members of the Association receive all issues while four issues of SOUTHERN NEWS 



46/General Information 

AND VIEWS are mailed to all persons on record in the Alumni Office. Graduates and 
former students are urged to become active members of the organization and to help sup- 
port the program of activities that is designed to assist the University in its growth and 
development. 

The Alumni Association sponsored the drive to raise the funds necessary for the con- 
struction of the first R. C. Cook University Union Building (now R. A. McLemore Hall). 
These funds were secured from alumni, faculty, students, friends, and the people of Forrest 
County and the state. 

For the past several years the Association has enlisted in excess of 10,000 active 
members with 13,786 being included during the most recent year. This has grown from 158 
during the 1952-1953 year. 

At the 1954 Homecoming meeting, the Association voted to observe March 30 as 
University of Southern Mississippi Day. Former students of the University are urged to get 
together on this date when two or more reside in the same area. Organized chapters elect of- 
ficers at this meeting. March 30 was selected from the important dates in the history of the 
school because it was on this day in 1910 that the Mississippi Legislature enacted legislation 
establishing the institution. 

The Alumni Association helped set up the University of Southern Mississippi Founda- 
tion which is the receptacle for all gifts to Southern, which gifts are, in turn, channeled into 
scholarships for the students. 

The Association organized, and works very closely with, the Student- Alumni Associa- 
tion. The purpose of this organization is to get students involved with the activities which 
the Alumni Association promotes in the interest of the University. A maximum of 100 
students are selected on the basis of their leadership ability and where they reside; these 
students are a very interested and active part of the Association. 



A. ORGANIZATION FOR INSTRUCTION 

The University of Southern Mississippi for purposes of undergraduate instruction is 
organized into the College of Business Administration, the College of Education and 
Psychology, the College of Fine Arts, the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Science 
and Technology, the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, the School of 
Home Economics, the School of Library Service, and the School of Nursing. 

The University of Southern Mississippi offers baccalaureate degrees in the following 



College/School Department Major 



Degree" 



College of Business Administration 

Economics 

Economics 
Finance and General Business 

Banking and Finance 



Management 



Marketing 



Business Administration 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Industrial Management 
Personnel Management 



Advertising 

Marketing Management 
Sales Management 

(Gulf Park and Natchez) 

Business Administration 

School of Professional Accountancy 
Accounting 

Industrial and Institutional 

Accounting 
Accounting/Data Processing 

College of Education and Psychology 

Business Education 

Bilingual Secretarial Studies 
Business Education 
Office Management 

Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education 
Social and Rehabilitation Services 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Elementary Education 
Secondary Education 

Industrial and Vocational Education 
Industrial Arts 
Industrial Mechanics 
Industrial and Vocational Education 

Psychology 

Psychology 

Special Education 

Special Education 



College of Fine Arts 

Art 



Art 

Art Education 



BSBA 

BSBA 
BSBA 
BSBA 

BSBA 
BSBA 

BSBA 
BSBA 
BSBA 

BS 



BSBA 
BSBA 



BS 
BS 
BS 

BS 

BS 
BS 

BS 
BS 
BS 

BA,BS 

BS 



BA,BFA 
BFA 



•Degree Abbreviations: (BA) Bachelor of Arts, (BFA) Bachelor of Fine Arts, (BM) Bachelor of Music, (BME) Bachelor 
of Music Education, (BS) Bachelor of Science, and (BSBA) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 



48/Organization 




Music 




Music 


BM 


Music Education 


BME 


Theatre Arts 




Dance 


BFA 


Theatre 


BFA 


College of Liberal Arts 




Criminal Justice 


BA,BS 


English 




English 


BA,BS 


Linguistics 


BA 


Foreign Language 




Classics 


BA,BS 


French 


BA,BS 


German 


BA,BS 


Spanish 


BA,BS 


Geography and Area Development 




Community and Regional Planning 


BS 


Economics 


BA 


Geography 


BA,BS 


History 




American Studies 


BA,BS 


History 


BA,BS 


Latin American Studies 


BA,BS 


Social Studies 


BA,BS 


Journalism 




Advertising 


BA,BS 


Journalism 


BA,BS 


Philosophy and Religion 




Philosophy 


BA,BS 


Philosophy and Religion 


BA,BS 


Political Science 




Paralegal Studies 


BA,BS 


Political Science 


BA,BS 


(Pre-Law)** 




Radio, Television, and Film 




Radio, Television, and Film 


BA,BS 


Sociology and Anthropology 




Anthropology 


BA,BS 


Sociology 


BA,BS 


Speech and Hearing Sciences 




Audiology 


BA,BS 


Education of the Deaf 


BA,BS 


Language Disorders 


BA,BS 


Speech Pathology 


BA,BS 


Speech Communication 




Communication 


BA,BS 


Speech Communication 


BA,BS 



College of Science and Technology 

Biology 

Biology BA,BS 

(Pre-Professional Studies)*** 

**This program does not lead to a degree. Students completing this program obtain a major in Political Science with an 
emphasis area in Pre-Law. 

•**This program does not lead to a degree. Students may select an emphasis from the following areas: Pre-Medical, 
Medical Records Administration, Pre-Dental, Pre-Dental Hygiene, Pre-Engineering, Pre-Optometry, Pre-Pharmacy, 
Pre-Physical Therapy, and Pre- Veterinary Medicine. 



Organization/49 



Chemistry 




Chemistry 


BS 


Computer Science and Statistics 




Computer Science 


BS 


Computer Science/Data Processing 


BS 


Computer Technology 


BS 


Statistics 


BS 


Construction and Architectural Technology 




Architectural Technology 


BS 


Building Construction Technology 


BS 


Geology 




Geology 


BS 


Industrial Technology 




Electronics Technology 


BS 


Environmental Technology 


BS 


Industrial Technology 


BS 


Mechanical Technology 


BS 


Mathematics 




Mathematics 


BA,BS 


Medical Technology 




Medical Technology 


BS 


Microbiology 




Food Science Technology 


BS 


Microbiology 


BS 


Physics and Astronomy 




Physics 


BS 


Polymer Science 




Plastics Technology 


BS 


Polymer Science 


BS 


Science Education 




Science Education 


BS 



School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

Athletic Administration and Coaching 



Athletic Administration and Coaching 


BS 


Health and Safety Education 




Health Education 


BS 


Physical Education 




Physical Education 


BS 


Recreation 




Recreation 


BS 


School of Home Economics 




Environmental Design 




Clothing Merchandising 


BS 


Clothing and Textiles 


BS 


Interior Design 


BS 


Family Life Services 




Child Development 


BS 


Home Economics in Equipment 


BS 


Marriage and Family Living 


BS 


Home Economics Education 




Home Economics Education 


BS 


Institution Administration 




Dietetics 


BS 


Food and Nutrition 


BS 


Hotel and Restaurant Administration 


BS 


Institution Management 


BS 



50/Organization 

School of Library Service 

Library Science 

Library Science BA,BS 

School of Nursing 

Nursing/Baccalaureate Program 

Nursing/Baccalaureate Program BS 

Obviously, many of these majors involve the closest cooperation among the Universi- 
ty's academic departments. A detailed analysis of majors, emphasis areas, and minors is 
found under the section of this catalog devoted to each specific college or school. 

B. GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

1. Semester Calendar: The University of Southern Mississippi is on the semester calen- 
dar. 

2. Penalties for Late Registration: Registration will continue after the close of the 
scheduled registration period (see Calendar) for seven class days. Beginning at 8:00 A.M. 
on the eighth day of scheduled class work all registrations will cease for that semester. 

A late registration fee will be charged to all students registering after the scheduled 
registration period. The fee is ten dollars ($10.00). 

3. Change of Schedule and Withdrawal from the University: A student may be allow- 
ed to drop a course through the 26th class day. A student dropping a course after this 
deadline will receive a grade of W or F. A dean may permit a student to drop a course after 
the deadline without penalty if extenuating circumstances exist. A fee of five dollars ($5.00) 
is charged for a change in registration after the regularly scheduled registration period (see 
Calendar). 

A student withdrawing from the University prior to the deadline for dropping classes 
will not receive any grades. His record will show the date of withdrawal only. A student 
withdrawing after the deadline for dropping courses will receive a grade of W (withdrawal 
passing) or a grade of F (withdrawal failing). 

4. Load of Work: The typical student load is twelve (12) to nineteen (19) semester 
hours. 

a. Freshmen— Nineteen hours is the maximum load for freshmen without dean of 
college or school approval. 

b. Sophomores — Nineteen hours is the maximum for sophomores without dean of 
college or school approval. 

c. Junior and Seniors— Not over 19 hours without dean of college or school ap- 
proval. The maximum load for juniors and seniors is twenty-one (21 ) hours. 

5. Absences: Students are expected to attend all classes each time the classes meet. 
When it is necessary that a student be absent from a class, courtesy requires an explanation 
to the instructor in charge. Class attendance policy will be set by the professor. It will be the 
responsibility of each professor to notify his classes at the outset of each semester as to the 
attendance requirements to which each student must adhere. Teachers should report all ex- 
cessive absences to the Dean of Students. 

6. Examinations: Examinations will be held on the last five days of each semester (see 
Calendar). 

No final examinations are permitted prior to the scheduled examination period (see 
Calendar). 

A student who is absent from the final examinations without valid reason approved by 
the Vice President for Academic Affairs forfeits credit for the semester. 

7. Grading System: 

A — indicates superior work and carries 4 quality points per semester hour. 

B — indicates excellent work and carries 3 quality points per semester hour. 

C — indicates average work and carries 2 quality points per semester hour. 

D — indicates inferior work and carries 1 quality point per semester hour. 

E — indicates a course in progress. Not included in the grade point average, a grade of E 
shall be awarded for graduate thesis and dissertation courses and for such self-paced 
or skill courses as the Academic and/or Graduate Council may designate. An E shall 
be changed to a P or a valuative grade (A,B»C,D,F) only in the case of credit for thesis 



Grading System/51 

and disserations and then only for the minimum hours required (usually 6 hours). 
Otherwise, the E remains on the record indicating that to receive credit the student 
must re-register for the undergraduate course, repeating it on a regular basis until 
completing it. Upon completion, the appropriate grade, whether P or valuative, shall 
be assigned. 
F — indicates failure and carries no quality points. A grade of F may not be removed by 
taking an independent study course. The grade of F will also be assigned if a student 
withdraws from the University after the deadline and has failing grades at the time of 
withdrawal (see below). 
W — indicates withdrawal from a course passing (see below). 

I — indicates an incomplete record and will have no immediate impact on a student's 
grade point average. An I becomes an F if not removed within one term of attendance. 
An I may not be removed by taking an independent study course. The I grade in an in- 
complete course will be treated as an F if the student chooses to re-register for the 
course. A student who is absent from the final examination without valid reason ap- 
proved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs forfeits credit for the course. 
N — indicates a failing grade in courses taken on a pass-fail basis. 
P — indicates a passing grade in courses taken on a pass-fail basis. 

X — indicates failure to drop or withdraw properly, but only before the 20th class day. It 
will count as an F in the student's grade point average and may not be used for a stu- 
dent who simply stops attending class after the drop date. Upon completion of the 
drop/withdrawal form and payment of the appropriate fees, the Registrar is authoriz- 
ed to replace the grade of X with a W. 
NOTE: A faculty regulation provides that except in cases of obvious clerical error, a grade 
of A,B»C,D, or F may not be changed without permission given by the faculty in regular 
meeting. 

Pass-Fail: Students may take courses either on a pass-fail basis or for a grade. The op- 
tion must be exercised at the time of registration, and the option may not be altered after 
the deadline for dropping courses without academic penalty. No more than thirty-six (36) 
semester hours earned in independent study, extension work, or pass-fail courses, with a 
limit of eighteen (18) semester hours of pass-fail courses, may be applied toward a degree. 
No more than twelve (12) semester hours earned from the same department by independent 
study, extension work, or pass-fail courses may be applied toward a degree. A student may 
not take a course on a pass-fail basis to remove an F or an Incomplete. Such courses cannot 
be a part of a prescribed degree program, i.e., core requirements, major, or minor except 
for physical education courses in the General Core. 

Audit: A student who takes a course for audit (non-credit) must meet the class in the 
same manner as a student regularly enrolled. Although no credit is awarded, a student who 
meets the instructor's requirements for a successful audit will receive an appropriate entry 
on his/her official record. The instructor has the right to remove a student from the final 
grade roster for non-attendance. The credit option (audit to credit or credit to audit) may 
not be changed after the deadline for adding courses. The fee for audit is the same as if 
registered for credit. 

Computation of Grade Point Averages: Quality point averages are based on the 
number of hours undertaken rather than the number of hours passed in determining 
whether a student meets minimum standards. The total hours attempted, for suspension 
purposes, will include credit undertaken at the University and credit transferred; the quality 
point average will involve only credit for courses attempted at the University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

Courses in which a student receives an E will not be counted in the "total hours at- 
tempted." 

An undergraduate student will be permitted to repeat courses a total of six (6) times or 
a total of eighteen (18) semester hours in order to improve his grade-point average. (That is 
he may repeat one three-hour course six times, three three-hour courses twice each, six 
three-hour courses once each, etc.) The six-repeat rule shall include all repeats including 
junior college or any other college or university work. The first six (6) repeats used shall 
stand. Other than these "repeats" all credit attempted will be used in computing the grade- 
point average. This policy became effective with courses taken after September 1 , 1967. 



52/Organization 

Dean's List: Students will be placed on the Dean's List if they have maintained a quali- 
ty point ratio of 3.25 or above on an academic load of twelve (12) semester hours or more, 
provided they have no grade of D or below. 

President's List: Students will be placed on the President's List if they have earned a 
quality point ratio of 4.0 (all A's) on a load of twelve (12) semester hours or more. 

8. Academic Standards: An undergraduate student, to move assuredly toward a 
degree, should maintain the following grade point averages. 

Total Hours Attempted Required Grade Point Average 

(Including transfer credit) (USM work only) 

18 through 24 1.25 

25 through 36 1 .50 

37 through 48 1.65 

49 through 60 1.75 

.61 through 72 1.80 

73 through 84 1.85 

85 through 96 1.90 

97 through 108 1.95 

109 and above 1.97 

For graduation 2.00 

If a student does not attain the minimum GPA on the scale he is placed on academic 
probation at the end of the semester. To register for classes the following semester he must 
receive clearance from his major department chairman and from the dean of the college or 
school in which he wishes to be enrolled. If evidence of improvement toward the prescribed 
GPA is made during the probationary period the student is continued on probation the 
subsequent semester but is considered making progress toward a degree. 

However, students receiving Veterans Administration educational benefits under 
Chapters 31, 32, 34 and/or 35 may not receive benefits during a second consecutive proba- 
tionary period unless approved by the Veterans Administration. 

However, if the student does not attain the prescribed GPA after two probationary 
semesters, he will be placed on academic suspension and must withdraw from the Universi- 
ty for one semester or be cleared for readmission by the appropriate dean upon appeal. 
Notice of probation or suspension will be carried on the end-of-semester grade report. 
Total hours attempted will include credit undertaken at the University and credit transfer- 
red. The quality point average will involve only courses attempted at USM. Courses in 
which a student received an I will not be counted in the "total hours attempted." 

Appeals for reinstatement by students suspended under this policy will be directed to 
the department chairman and the dean of the college or school in which the student is 
enrolled. 

Any student who earns a 0.00 grade point average on twelve (12) or more hours for any 
one semester will be automatically suspended regardless of his overall grade point average 
and must appeal the suspension in the same manner as any other academically suspended 
student. 

Students on academic or disciplinary suspension may not enroll in courses offered by 
the University of Southern Mississippi. 

9. Memorandum of Credits: A memorandum of credits is a statement available from 
the Office of the Registrar showing the courses completed and credits earned by the student 
as of the date of the memorandum. Memoranda are fifty cents each. 

10. Classification of Undergraduates: A student is classified as a: Freshman when he 
has less than 27 semester hours of earned credit; Sophomore when he has as many as 27 
semester hours and less than 54 semester hours: Junior when he has as many as 54 hours 
and less than 87 hours; Senior when he has 87 or more semester hours of earned credit. 

11. Course Numbering: Freshman courses are numbered from 100 to 199; sophomore 
courses from 200 to 299; upper division courses from 300 to 499; graduate courses 500 or 
above. Courses taken by independent study will carry the prefix C. Honors courses carry 
the prefix H. 

The department code number which is used at registration is listed in the Course 
Description Section of this Bulletin. 

Freshman and sophomore students are not ordinarily permitted to register for upper 
division courses. 



Credit/53 

12. Course Sequence and Related Sequences: Certain 100 and 200- level courses may 
not be taken for credit by a student after he has completed higher level courses in the same 
subject area. Also, certain sequences of courses may not be taken for credit after a student 
has completed parallel courses which are similar in subject matter. Specific applications of 
this policy are indicated in the numbered course descriptions in the Course Description Sec- 
tion of this catalog. Selection of the courses, as well as exceptions to the policy, is left to the 
department chairmen. 

13. Credit by Examination: The University of Southern Mississippi will allow students 
to earn credit by examination under one or more of the following programs up to a total of 
thirty (30) semester hours. 

Credit earned through the use of the examination will be included in the sixty-four (64) 
hours "Limitation of Transfer Credits" rule and may not be used to meet the thirty-two 
(32) hours on-campus requirement. 

a. College Level Examination Program: The University of Southern Mississippi will 
allow credit examination to those students who have participated in the College Level Ex- 
amination Program and have achieved a scaled score of 500 or above. Credit will be 
restricted to students who have been out of high school for at least three (3) years. It will be 
the responsibility of the Admissions Office to determine a person's eligibility to receive 
credit. A student who has earned over thirty (30) semester hours of college credit may not 
earn additional credit through the use of this examination. Credit appearing on another in- 
stitution's transcript will be accepted as transfer credit. Credit will be granted for successful 
completion of the examination in the following manner. 

CLEP General Course Semester 

Examination Equivalent Hours 

English Composition ENG 101, 102 6 

Social Science History 3 

Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Natural Science FS 104, 106 6 

Humanities AA 100 3 

Literature 3 

Mathematics MAT 101 3 

MAT Elective ^3 

Total 30 

Credit will be awarded for each area in which the student receives a scale score of 500 or 
above. 

b. College Level Examination Program: Subject Area Examination: A student of any 
age who has not earned college-level credit in the subject area in which he/she seeks credit 
can take a CLEP subject-area examination for advanced placement and college credit. 
CLEP credit cannot be used to remove an F grade. Credit will be awarded for a scale score 
of 50 or above. The optional essay is required for all English and Psychology examinations. 
The appropriate department at USM will have final determination in the amount of credit 
to be awarded based on the optional essay. Under this program, students are restricted to a 
maximum of thirty (30) semester hours, with not more than six (6) hours or two (2) courses 
in one subject-matter area. (It is understood that the thirty (30) hour total includes all credit 
earned by examination.) The adoption of the CLEP standardized examination will preclude 
the use of departmental examinations except in those areas where CLEP examinations are 
not available. The Admissions Office will be charged with responsibility for determining 
student's eligibility to earn credit through these examinations. Credit appearing on another 
institution's transcript will be accepted as transfer credit. 

Additional information, applications, and CLEP Bulletins may be secured from the 
Office of High School and Junior College Relations, Room 212, Student Services Building, 
or by writing Southern Station, Box 501 1 . 

c. Advanced Placement Program: Students from cooperating high schools can earn up 
to eighteen (18) hours (with no more than six (6) hours or two (2) courses in one subject- 
matter area) through the College Board's Advanced Placement Testing Program. Credit is 
to be awarded only for grades of 3 or above. The awarding of credit will be administered by 
the Office of Admissions. 

d. Challenge Examination: Under the following policy, and with the approval of the 
Vice President for Academic Affairs, departments may grant credit by examination in lieu 



54/Organization 

of class enrollment for courses where no CLEP subject area examination is offered. 

a. The examination must be given by the department in which the course is of- 
fered. 

b. The department chairman must be assured that the student has had some formal 
or informal learning experience which has prepared him for the examination. 

c. The student must make application to the chairman of the department in which 
the course is offered. If approval is granted, the student will pay a $10.00 ex- 
amination fee in the Business Office. The student then presents his receipt to the 
department chairman who will administer the examination. 

d. If the student passes the examination, a memorandum must be forwarded to the 
Registrar giving the name of the department, course number, course title, 
grade, semester hours, and the date the examination was taken and evidence 
that the examination fee has been paid. 

14. Summary of Types and Limitations of Credit Usage 

The following is a summary of the limitations placed on credit usage: 

a. Sixty-four (64) semester hours through a combination of credit by examination, 
extension, independent study, and Armed Forces experiences. 

b. Thirty-two (32) semester hours through a combination of independent study 
(including USAFI) and extension work. (USAFI and other correspondence 
credit limited to nine (9) semester hours in any one field.) 

c . Thirty (30) semester hours credit by examination (including CLEP). 

d. Thirty (30) semester hours through a combination of independent study, exten- 
sion, and pass-fail credit. 

3 . Eighteen ( 1 8) semester hours of pass-fail credit. 

f. Twelve (12) semester hours in the same department through a combination of 
independent study, extension, and pass-fail. 

g. Sixty-four (64) semester hours in a senior college are required for a bac- 
calaureate degree. Of this total forty-five (45) must be in course numbers 300- 
level or above. 

h. The types of credit considered as senior college work are: (1) USM-Hattiesburg; 

(2) USM-Gulf Park; (3) USM-Natchez; (4) USM-Jackson County; (5) USM- 

Jackson; (6) Extension; (7) Independent Study; (8) USAFI*; (9) Armed Forces 

experiences.* 
i. Types of credit not considered senior college work: (1) Junior college transfer 

work; (2) CLEP; (3) USAFI**; (4) Armed Forces experience.** 

*If course number evaluations are 300-level or above 
••If course number evaluation are below 300-level 

C. GENERAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

1. Choice of Catalog: Graduation requirements must be met under a catalog which is 
not more than six years old at the time of the student's graduation and which carries an- 
nouncements for a year during which the student earned some credit at the University of 
Southern Mississippi. A transfer student from a Mississippi junior college may graduate 
under a catalog which was in force during the time he attended a Mississippi junior college 
provided the catalog is not more than six years old at the time of the student's graduation. 

2. Hour Requirements: An applicant for a degree must complete 128 semester hours, 
including core requirements and major and minor requirements. Not more than nine (9) 
semester hours in physical education activity courses, and not more than four (4) semester 
hours credit in any one varsity sport may be used in meeting total hour requirements for a 
degree. Courses in dance are excluded from this limitation. Of the total of 128 semester 
hours, sixty-four (64) must be earned in a senior college, and forty-five (45) of the sixty- 
four (64) must be in courses numbered 300 or above. 

3. Quality Point Requirement: A student must earn a quality point ratio of at least 2.0 
(an average grade of C) based on all courses undertaken at the University of Southern 
Mississippi. Grades in pass-fail courses do not carry quality points. 

4. Hour and Quality Point Requirements for Pre-Professional Degrees: University of 
Southern Mississippi students may be allowed to complete degree requirements for the 
Bachelor of Science or the Bachelor of Arts degree in professional, accredited schools of 



General Core Curriculum/55 

medicine, medical technology, dentistry, or law on the following conditions: 

a. that (90) hours of credit and 180 quality points shall have been completed, with 
a minimum of two semesters and thirty (30) semester hours of residence at the 
University of Southern Mississippi; 

b. that all core requirements for the degree shall have been completed; 

c. that credit and quality points shall be transferred back to the University of 
Southern Mississippi from the accredited school of medicine, dentistry, medical 
technology, or law to complete requirements for the degree. A minimum of one 
year's work must be transferred. In any case, a minimum of 128 semester hours 
must be completed before the degree can be awarded; 

d. that the program leading to the degree shall be completed within two calendar 
years of the termination of the last semester of residence at the University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

5. Residence Hour Requirements: To become eligible for a bachelor's degree at the 
University of Southern Mississippi, a student must: 

a. earn his last thirty-two (32) semester hours at the University of Southern 
Mississippi, of which twelve (12) semester hours must be in upper-division 
courses in his major. Military personnel participating in Operation Bootstrap 
may meet this requirement by completing thirty (30) semester hours of resident 
credit; 

(Special Note— to receive the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 
degree from the College of Business Administration, a student must complete 
the senior year's work (32 semester hours) on the Hattiesburg campus. At least 
twelve (12) of the thirty- two (32) semester hours must come from senior level 
courses in the major field. This policy applies to all students, including transfer 
students from other colleges and universities and those students at USM-Gulf 
Park and USM-Natchez. The transfer student must meet the quality point re- 
quirements for work undertaken on the Hattiesburg campus that apply to all the 
regular students.) 

b. earn at least twelve (12) semester hours of the bachelor's program on the cam- 
pus from which the degree will be awarded except for the Bachelor's of Science 
in Business Administration which requires the last thirty-two (32) semester 
hours on the Hattiesburg campus; 

c. earn at least twelve (12) semester hours of resident credit in the major field of 
study at one of the campuses of the University except for the Bachelor of 
Science in Business Administration which requires at least twelve (12) semester 
hours of senior level work in the major field on the Hattiesburg campus; 

d. recognize the limitation on Independent Study Courses: A long-standing regula- 
tion provides that students will not be permitted to do independent study while 
in residence. Students not attending the University during the summer session 
are not considered to be in residence and may enroll in independent study 
courses without prior approval; however, they should consult with their faculty 
adviser for assistance in course selections. Exceptions to this regulation can only 
be made with the approval of the appropriate dean and the Vice President for 
Academic Affairs. If a student takes an independent study course during his last 
semester of attendance, he may not register for an independent study course 
after he leaves the campus with the expectation of completing requirements for 
his degree. 

6. General Core Requirements: The purpose of the General Core requirement is two- 
fold: to give all University students a common cultural experience, and to extend this 
shared experience over a wide enough range of skills and major disciplines so that the in- 
dividual student may gain a better perspective of his own special abilities and interests. 

It is the purpose of the degree programs in the upper-level colleges and schools to build 
upon the common core experience in guiding students toward majors and minors which will 
reflect their individual capacities and life aims. 

The General Core requirement, common to all degree programs, is itemized below. 



56/Organization 

THE GENERAL CORE CURRICULUM 

Hours 

English 101 , 1 02 6 

Humanities and Fine Arts 

Six hours from the following areas: literature, allied arts, 

foreign language, history, philosophy, religion 6 

Social Sciences* 

Nine hours from the following areas with no more than 

three hours from any one area: anthropology, economics 

geography, psychology, sociology, political science 9 

Mathematics 3 

Science* 6 

Physical Education or approved substitute** /I 

Total 32 

*For recommendations and requirements in these areas, the student should consult the introduction to the appropriate 
degree-granting college or school. Note also that each college or school has additional requirements for its specific core. In 
addition each degree-granting college or school has its own requirements for a particular degree. These requirements are 
designed to give the student the necessary preparation for completing a major and are listed in the Colleges and Schools 
Section. 

"Students are required to take two physical education activity courses during the freshman year unless excused from the 
requirement by the University physician or the dean of his school or college. Students who complete Military Science I or 
Aerospace Studies are excused from the physical education requirement. Those participating in varsity athletics, Mar- 
ching Band, Dixie Darlings, Cheer Leaders, or Pom Pon Girls may substitute this for required physical education. Only 
one physical education activity course may be taken any one semester. Each of the following theater courses may be 
substituted for one hour of the General Core Physical Education requirement: Theatre 105, 106, 1 50, 250. A graduate of a 
Mississippi junior college will not be required to complete additional physical activity courses in order to meet catalog re- 
quirements for graduation. 

7. Exemption from the General Core Requirements: With the approval of the ap- 
propriate dean, students may be exempt from any part of the core requirements for any 
degree on the basis of satisfactory attainment as demonstrated by previous academic 
record. The granting of this exemption by a dean does not involve the bestowal of credit; 
neither does it reduce the total number of hours to be earned for a degree. Its only effect is 
to increase the number of electives which the student may include in his degree program. 

8. Change of Major within a College or School: Any student wishing to change his 
major within a college or school must secure the approval of the dean. 

9. Change of College or School: Students wishing to transfer from one college or 
school of the University to another must make application to and be approved by the dean 
of the college or school they wish to enter. 

10. Quality Point Requirement for the Major and Minor: A student must have a quali- 
ty point average of at least 2.0 (a C) in the major field and in the minor field on courses 
taken at the University of Southern Mississippi. 

A transfer student's work done in the major and minor fields in another institution 
must average at least 2.0 to be applicable toward the major and minor requirements at the 
University of Southern Mississippi. If the transferred work does not average at least a C, 
the student must remove any deficiencies in that part of the major and minor credit being 
transferred. Transferred deficiencies may be removed by: (a) repeating at the University of 
Southern Mississippi a sufficient number of courses on which grades of D were transferred 
and thereby raising the grades in those courses to the level required for a C average, or (b) 
striking from the transferred transcript courses in the major or minor field with grades of D 
and taking additional courses in the major or minor at the upper division level to meet the 
University's degree requirements. 

11. Application for Degree: A student is expected to file an application for a degree at 
least two (2) semesters before degree requirements are completed and an application will be 
accepted no later than the last class day of the semester preceding graduation. This applica- 
tion filed with the Registrar will show the work completed by the student and the courses 
planned for the ensuing semesters. Filing two (2) semesters in advance of the proposed 
graduation date will allow time for checking the application and also allow the student time 
for making up deficiencies found in the degree program. After the application has been ap- 
proved by the Registrar's Office, it becomes the student's official degree program. 

No application for degree will be accepted until the degree fee of fifteen dollars 



Minor Requirements/57 

($15.00) has been paid at the Business Office. Application forms may be obtained in the 
school or college Office of the Dean. 

12. Approval of Faculty: The names of all applicants for degrees are submitted to a 
vote of the faculty. If this vote is favorable, the President of the University is authorized by 
the Board of Trustees to grant the degree. 

13. Degrees with Honors: Students with exceptional academic records may be award- 
ed degrees with honors or the highest honors. The residence requirement for such degrees is 
not less than four semesters with a load of not less than twelve (12) semester hours in 
residence credit each semester (a load of not less than six (6) semester hours each quarter 
will apply to USM-Gulf Park and USM-Natchez), and totaling not less than fifty-four (54) 
semester hours of residence credit on the Hattiesburg campus. A degree with honors will be 
granted to a student who maintains a quality-point average of 3.5 or more. A degree with 
highest honors will be granted to a student who maintains a quality-point average of 3.8 or 
more. Graduation cum laude will be granted to students who meet the following stipula- 
tions: (a) the satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination in the major field, 
such examination to be designed and administered by the department involved; (b) the 
satisfactory completion of a senior project resulting in a written report on that project 
meeting the guidelines presently in effect for senior Honors projects; (c) notice of intent to 
meet these requirements must be filed with the Dean of the Honors College at least one 
calendar year prior to graduation; (d) an overall quality point average of 3.25 to 3.49. 
Graduation magna cum laude will be granted to students who meet the following stipula- 
tions: (a), (b), and (c) above, (d) an overall quality-point average of 3.50-3.79. Graduation 
summa cum laude requires (a), (b), and (c) above, (d) an overall quality-point average of 
3.80 or above. 

14. Second Baccalaureate Degree: The University of Southern Mississippi will grant a 
candidate a second baccalaureate degree based upon requirements of an applicable catalog, 
provided the program for the second degree includes at least thirty-two (32) semester hours 
with at least sixty-four (64) quality points (equivalent to a 2.0 average on a 4.0 scale). The 
actual number of hours to be taken (which may exceed thirty-two (32) as well as the specific 
degree requirements will be established by the academic department responsible for the area 
of study in which the second baccalaureate is sought. In all cases, a 2.0 grade point average 
is required. 

Students enrolled in a second degree program may be allowed to repeat a total of six 
(6) semester hours in order to improve the grade point average. 

D. MINOR REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the major, each student, should his program so require, must also 
choose a minor (or else a second major). He should select his minor in consultation with his 
adviser. A minimum of eighteen (18) semester hours is needed for the minor, with the quali- 
ty point requirement as noted in paragraph C-10 above. Students who complete the Ad- 
vanced Course in Military Science (ROTC) or the Professional Officer Course in Aerospace 
Studies (AFROTC) are allowed to waive the requirement for an academic minor. The work 
taken in the major may not apply to the minor. 

With certain exceptions any of the areas of specialization or majors indicated above 
may be selected for the minor. In choosing a minor, however, the student should be guided 
by the following policies: 

1. A student working for a non-teaching degree must establish a minor (18 hours) 
chosen from the fields listed above as possible majors with two exceptions: 

a. A student may establish a minor for the non-teaching degree in general science 
by offering twenty-seven (27) hours from two or more appropriate fields 
(biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics, and physics), provided he offers at 
least nine (9) hours from each field he chooses to include. 

b. To establish a minor in any field, a student must earn at least nine (9) hours 
above the core requirements in that field. 

2. A student working for a teaching degree in secondary education necessarily 
establishes a minor in secondary education. 

Since many high schools in Mississippi require teachers to teach in more than one field, 
it is recommended that students working for secondary education certification plan their 
electives so as to meet certification requirements in some subject in addition to their major. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 



Department 



Major 



Degree" 



ECONOMICS 



ECONOMICS* 



FINANCE AND GENERAL BUSINESS 

BANKING AND FINANCE 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION* 
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 



BSBA 



BSBA 
BSBA 
BSBA 



MANAGEMENT 



INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT 
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT* 



BSBA 
BSBA 



MARKETING 



ADVERTISING 

MARKETING MANAGEMENT* 

SALES MANAGEMENT 



BSBA 
BSBA 
BSBA 



(Gulf Park and Natchez only)*** 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION' 



BS 



SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANCY 
ACCOUNTING 

ACCOUNTING/DATA PROCESSING 
INDUSTRIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL 
ACCOUNTING* 



BSBA 
BSBA 



'Minor Available 

'Degree Abbreviations: (BS) Bachelor of Science, (BSBA) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

'Degree-granting off-campus centers 



BULLETINS 

The University of Southern Mississippi has four publications each year; the 
Undergraduate Bulletin, the Graduate Bulletin, the Independent Study Bulletin, and the 
Regional Campus Bulletin. To get the complete programs of the University, please check 
each Bulletin. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Joseph A. Greene, Jr., Dean 
H.O. Jackson, Assistant Dean 

PURPOSE 

Rapid technological change, the increasing complexity of society, and the growing role 
of government in business, economic, and social affairs are placing new requirements on 
the administrators throughout the country whether they are employed in business, govern- 
ment, or non-profit organizations. 

Within the College of Business Administration the content of the courses and the cur- 
ricula are changed as needed to see that the College meets its primary objective of assisting 
students in securing entry-level positions in business and government and provides them the 
background for attaining higher levels of managerial responsibility after experience. The 
young men and women who study in the College are provided with the opportunity for a 
liberal education as well as professional training. They are prepared to be flexible in their 
thinking and adaptable to change as well as knowledgeable in their chosen fields. Thus they 
are given help in preparing not only for careers but also for satisfactory lives and as con- 
structive citizens. 

A second objective of the College is to provide quality graduate education at the 
master's degree level for those currently working in business, military personnel with a need 
for business education, and college graduates who intend to pursue further graduate work 
elsewhere or prepare themselves better for beginning positions in business or government. 

Lastly, the College is committed, as resources permit it, to servicing businesses, profes- 
sional groups, and governmental units in the area through applied research and the spon- 
soring of workshops and seminars. 

To keep current changes in business education throughout the country the College is a 
member of the Southern Business Administration Association and the American Assembly 
of Collegiate Schools of Business. 

All undergraduate programs are fully accredited by the American Assembly of Col- 
legiate Schools of Business. 

ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION 

Academic Areas 

The College of Business Administration is organized so the student, after choosing a 
particular academic major, is placed under the jurisdiction of his school or department for 
academic advisement and attention. Each area offers several majors, so a student should 
examine the alternatives to select the one which suits him best. 

The academic areas are the School of Professional Accountancy and the Departments 
of Economics, Finance, Management, and Marketing. 

There is some divergence in the curriculum for those students majoring in accounting, 
but for the majority of students in the College, they pursue the same curriculum except for 
the major course requirements. Thus, it is possible for a student to change his major, if he 
has a change in interest, without a loss of time until the second semester of his junior year. 
Upon completion of all requirements the students, except in the School of Professional Ac- 
countancy, are awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. The 
accounting student may secure this degree or, if he meets specified requirements, pursue the 
five-year program leading to a master's degree in professional accounting. 

Administrative Office of the College 

The Office of the Dean is the chief administrative office for the College. Each 
academic Department has a chairman who is in charge of the programs in that department 
and the faculty who serve as student advisers for those programs. Most academic problems 
for the undergraduate student will be solved at the departmental level. The School of Pro- 
fessional Accountancy has a director and faculty advisers for all students majoring in ac- 
counting. 



60/College of Business Administration 

Under the Dean is the Coordinator of Graduate Studies who accepts and processes all 
applications for the Master of Business Administration degree. The graduate program in 
accounting is handled by the Director, School of Professional Accountancy. The student 
interested in graduate work upon completion of his undergraduate degree should contact 
the Coordinator of Graduate Studies concerning entrance requirements, objectives of the 
various emphases, and the possibility of a fellowship. 

The Bureau of Business Research is another administrative unit under the Dean. Its 
functions are designed to complement the overall program and objectives of the College of 
Business Administration. Specific functions included are to: provide an administrative 
framework for research projects; provide a source of support for, and flexibility of ap- 
proaches to, research by faculty members (including Bureau staff); publish research 
reports; provide a readily identifiable point of contact for business, industry, and govern- 
ment relative to research and services in the area of business and economics; provide for the 
development and execution of service programs; and maintain a framework to assist in the 
education and training of students. 

STUDENT PROCEDURES 

Admission 

High school graduates who are interested in a field of business and are admitted to the 
University as beginning freshmen will be admitted directly to the College of Business Ad- 
ministration. 

Students desiring to transfer from another school or college in the University must be 
in good academic standing and must bring to the Office of the Dean a transcript from the 
Registrar's Office for evaluation purposes. If the student is accepted he is assigned to a 
department for advisement purposes and his record is transferred to his new adviser. 

Transfer students from other four-year colleges or universities are admitted directly to 
the College upon admission to the University. Credits are evaluated in the Office of the 
Dean and records are distributed to the departments for advisement purposes. 

The junior college student intending to complete his degree in the College should con- 
centrate on completing his requirements as listed below in the Basic Curriculum Outside the 
College. Courses in business should be limited to the principles of accounting, principles of 
economics, and legal environment of business. The College will not accept as meeting cur- 
riculum requirements business courses taught at a junior college which are offered here at 
the junior or senior level. Also, courses which are designated as technical training courses 
or remedial courses of subcollegiate level such as intermediate algebra may not be used in 
meeting degree requirements. It is imperative that the student pay particular attention to 
the requirements in mathematics. 

The student majoring in accounting who desires the specialized degree in accounting 
must be admitted to the School of Professional Accountancy though he is still a student 
within the College. This may be done only after he has completed a sufficient number of ac- 
counting courses at the junior level to demonstrate exceptional ability in the field. 

Advisement 

The student is given an adviser within the department of his major. His record is main- 
tained in that department, and he is expected to go to the department each semester, pick 
up his registration packet, and consult with his adviser concerning his schedule. The packet 
must be signed by the adviser before registration can be completed. 

Students in accounting will be advised within the School of Professional Accountancy. 

Continuation 

While in the College the student must maintain the quality point average prescribed for 
his number of hours undertaken as designated under University regulations or face 
academic suspension. If suspended or placed on probation, the student may make applica- 
tion for reinstatement through forms provided in the Office of the Dean. His application is 
acted upon by the Reinstatement Committee which reviews these applications the day prior 



Business Administration/61 

to the registration period of each semester and interviews those students who are denied 
reinstatement and wish to appeal. 

Graduation Requirements 

To receive the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree from the College 
of Business Administration the senior year's work (32 semester hours) must be taken on the 
Hattiesburg campus. 

Of this requirement a sufficient number of hours of senior level courses in the major 
field must be taken to assure the quality of the degree. The absolute minimum is twelve (12) 
semester hours though this may be higher depending upon the recommendation of the 
department chairman. 

This policy applies to all students, including transfer students from other colleges and 
universities and those students at USM-Gulf Park and USM-Natchez. 

The transfer student must meet the quality point requirements for work undertaken on 
the Hattiesburg campus that apply to all regular students. 

For graduation the student should file his application for degree two semesters in ad- 
vance of his anticipated semester of graduation, and no later than mid-term of the semester 
prior to the graduation semester. The application form with instructions is to be picked up 
in the Office of the Dean. The degree application does not become a formal type of con- 
tract with the student for graduation until it has been thoroughly checked for all re- 
quirements by the degree clerk of the College in the Registrar's Office and approved by the 
Dean. Any changes requested on the application after its acceptance must come from the 
Office of the Dean. 

To meet graduation requirements the student must meet all requirements of his cur- 
riculum and have a 2.0 average overall, in his major requirements, and in the College of 
Business Administration. He must have a minimum of fifty-two (52) semester hours in the 
College of Business Administration as well as a minimum of fifty-two (52) semester hours 
in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Science and Technology. Total hours required for 
graduation are 128. 

Placement 

The College cooperates with the University Placement Services Office in assisting its 
graduates in finding positions. The student is expected to establish a file with Placement 
Services two semesters before graduation to avail himself to the opportunities to be inter- 
viewed or contacted by the many businesses and governmental bodies interested in business 
graduates. 

Student Organizations and Student Assistance 

The College promotes several professional and honorary societies for students in order 
to foster fellowship and scholarship among those with similar interests. These organiza- 
tions are: Alpha Epsilon Alpha, professional fraternity in accounting; Beta Gamma Sigma, 
National Honorary Fraternity in business; Delta Sigma Pi, professional fraternity for men 
in all areas of business; Omicron Delta Epsilon, honorary society in economics; Phi Chi 
Theta, professional fraternity for women; Rho Epsilon, professional fraternity in real 
estate; Society for Advancement of Management, professional fraternity in management; 
the U.S.M. Chapter- American Marketing Association. Representatives from these frater- 
nities and other students constitute the Business Student Advisory Council which works 
closely with the Dean in several projects. 

There are several scholarships available exclusively for students in the College of 
Business Administration as well as many others for which business students may apply. 
Any inquiry should be addressed to: Director of Financial Aid, Southern Station, Box 
5101, Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 



62/College of Business Administration 

BASIC CURRICULUM FOR ALL MAJORS IN THE 
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
FOR FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS 

The business graduate, though career oriented, must live and work in a changing socie- 
ty which will continually offer him personal and business challenges. Business leaders must 
have a blend of background which makes them cognizant of the past, articulate in many 
subjects, adaptable to change, and capable of using basic business tools on which to build 
with the specialized subjects of their majors. The first two years plus common business sub- 
jects taken during the last two years have been designed for this purpose. 

It may be observed a great deal of flexibility is offered in some of the areas. This per- 
mits the student a selection according to his interest and also permits him to substitute 
junior and senior level courses if he failed to cover the subjects in his first two years or is 
particularly interested in some courses subjects in his first two years or is particularly in- 
terested in some courses offered at the upper level. 

Remedial courses in English, mathematics, and science may not be counted toward 
meeting degree requirements. 

Mathematics 312 is strongly recommended and is a necessity for the student con- 
templating graduate work. 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE SEM. HRS. 



English 101 , 102 6 Accounting 201 , 202 6 

Geography or Political Science 3 Anthropology, psychology, 

History 6 sociology 6 

Mathematics 101, 112 6 Economics 255, 256 6 

Physical Education or General Business 290 3 

ROTC/AFROTC 2 General Business 295 3 

Science — biology, chemistry, Humanities — 

fundamentals, geology, or Literature 3 

physics 6 Two courses from: 

Speech Communication 1 1 1 literature, allied arts, 

(advanced course acceptable) 3 foreign language, religion, 

philosophy ^ 

32 33 



SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANCY 

Jerold J. Morgan, Director 

H.G. Anderson, Carpenter, Dear, Estes, Harris, Harrison 

H. Jackson, Kenamond, Kilpatrick, H. Parker, Posey, Thrower, Torres, Wilson 

The School of Professional Accountancy offers undergraduate programs with suffi- 
cient options to permit students to prepare for careers requiring differing levels of expertise 
in accounting. The major in Industrial and Institutional Accounting is the traditional four- 
year undergraduate program which prepares students for a majority of the entry level ac- 
counting positions in business and government. The Accounting-Data Processing major is 
a newer program which is intended to prepare students for those positions in which com- 
petence in both accounting and data processing is required. In addition, these programs are 
designed to form a firm foundation for graduate study in business or in professional ac- 
countancy. Upon completion of either program the student is awarded the Bachelor of 
Science in Business Administration degree. 

The program in Professional Accountancy is a five-year program leading to the Master 
of Professional Accountancy degree. This program is designed to serve the needs of 
students who wish to pursue careers in public accounting and in professional accounting 
positions with business and government. Students seeking admission to the professional 
program must apply to the School of Professional Accountancy and meet rigorous admis- 



Accountancy/63 

sion and retention standards. Applicants may apply for admission to this program upon 
completion of ninety (90) semester hours of undergraduate work including at least twelve 
(12) semester hours credit in accounting courses numbered above 300. A minimum overall 
grade point average of 2.75 is required for admission with the minimum of a 3.00 grade 
average in accounting courses numbered above 300. Before enrolling in courses numbered 
500 and above, students must gain admission to the Graduate School. The student is award- 
ed a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree upon completion of 128 hours 
which include all courses required for either four-year major. Upon completion of the full 
program with a minimum of a 3.0 grade average in courses numbered above 400, the stu- 
dent is awarded a Master of Professional Accountancy degree. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTING 
JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Accounting 301 , 302, 320, 330 12 Accounting 307, 401 , 409, 420 12 

Computer Science 342 3 Finance 389 3 

Economics 301 , 302, 330 9 General Business 311 3 

Management 360 3 Management 485 3 

Marketing 300 3 Electives (Students planning to 

Mathematics 312 3 enter the Professional Accountancy 

program should select three courses 
from Accounting 402, 405, 410, and 

_ 430) K) 

33 31 

TOTAL: 128 
After completion of the BSBA program above, students desiring to pursue the profes- 
sional program in Accountancy must gain admission to the Graduate School and pursue the 
following program. 

FIFTH YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 502*, 505*, 510*, 

530*, 580*, 605, 610, 630, 

640 27 

Economics 606 or 625 and 

Economics 608 or General 

Business 615 or General 

Business 625 ^ 

33 

•Students who have credit in equivalent undergraduate courses may waive up to three hours or substitute business courses 
numbered over 600 with consent of the director. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ACCOUNTING — DATA-PROCESSING 
JUNIOR YEAR SEM.HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM.HRS. 



Accounting 301, 302, 320 9 Accounting 330, 401, 409 9 

Computer Science 320, 341 , 342 9 Computer Science 442, 480 6 

Economics 301 , 302, 330 9 Finance 389 3 

Management 360 3 Management 485 3 

Mathematics 312 3 Marketing 300 3 

Electives (Students planning to 
enter the Professional Accountancy 
program should select from ACC 307 
and accounting courses numbered 

above 400) .9 

33 31 

TOTAL: 128 



64/College of Business Administration 

After completion of the BSBA. program above, students desiring to pursue the profes- 
sional program in Accountancy must gain admission to the Graduate School and pursue the 
following program. 

FIFTH YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Accounting 502*, 505*, 510*, 
520*, 530*, 580*, 605, 610, 

630, 640 30 

Economics 606 or 625 and Economics 
608 or General Business 61 5 or 

General Business 625 ^6 

36 
♦Students who have credit in equivalent undergraduate courses may waive up to six 
hours or substitute business courses numbered over 600 with consent of the director. 

RECOMMENDED MINOR 

Accounting 201 , 202, 301 , 302, 320, 330 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Tyrone Black, Chairman 
Cameron, G. Carter, Greene, E. Lewis, C. Li, M. Martin, 
McQuiston, Nissan, Whitesell, D.C. Williams, Wimberly 
The Economics Curriculum is designed to prepare students for positions in business, 
government, education, and for graduate study. The courses in the Economics major aug- 
ment the basic non-business and business curricula, and the complete, four-year program 
provides the requisite skills for entry-level positions. Additionally, the courses comprising 
the major analyze many of the economic problems and issues that middle- and upper-level 
managers and administrators must deal with. For those who are interested in careers in 
government or international trade, concentrations in both areas are available and are listed 
below. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS FOR 

MAJOR IN ECONOMICS (BSBA) 

(Freshman and sophomore requirements for a major in Economics are listed in the 
beginning section of the College of Business Administration.) 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Economics 301 , 302, 330, 340, 345, Accounting 300 3 

Economics Elective* 18 Directed Elective** 3 

Elective 3 Economics 310, 435, 

Finance 389 3 Economics Electives (2)* 12 

Management 360 3 Electives 10 

Marketing 300 3 Management 485 3 

Mathematics 312 .J 

33 31 

Total: 128 

•The Economics electives can be selected for the following concentrations: 

1 . Public Administration Economics 401 and 402 and Political Science 370. 

2. International Trade Economics 440, Finance 472, and Marketing 495. 

••Mathematics, computer science, social science, or behavioral science courses may be used for the directed elective. 



Finance and General Business/65 

A Bachelor of Arts in Economics is also available; the requirements for the B.A. 
degree are listed in the Liberal Arts section of this Bulletin. 

The recommended minor in Economics for students outside the College of Business 
Administration consists of Economics 255, 256, 301 ,310, 330, 340 and 345. 



DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE AND GENERAL BUSINESS 

William A. Sirmon, Chairman 
Burton, Cartee, Clements, Daniel, C. Dennis, 
B. Green, Hamwi, B. Jordan, R.T. King, West 

This department offers major fields of study in three areas: Banking and Finance, 
Business Administration, and Real Estate and Insurance. The policy of the department is to 
stress education in the selection and handling of tools for problem-solving, analysis, and 
decision-making in each of the three areas of study. An approach of this kind is premised 
on the belief that the best qualification for administering business in the three areas is a 
mind disciplined to identify and analyze administrative issues and to make decision at all 
levels of management. 

The offerings in the field of Banking and Finance qualify the student to enter ad- 
ministrative training programs of financial and non-financial institutions. Offerings in the 
Business Administration field necessarily cut across several segments of the business cur- 
riculum including economics, finance, management, and marketing, thus opening the door 
to a somewhat wider range of job opportunities. Offerings in the Real Estate and Insurance 
major are, by contrast, more specialized, being designed essentially for the person in- 
terested in selling, risk management, and property and agency management, as they relate 
to the insurance and real estate industries. 

The student who wishes to further his education may work for the master's degree with 
an emphasis in finance. This degree will strengthen his qualifications for higher-level ad- 
ministrative positions in business and will also open new doors to teaching, research, and 
graduate work at the doctoral level. 

The department has a recommended minor for non-business majors which requires 
ACC 201 and 202, ECO 200, and three electives from one of the following fields: Finance, 
Business Administration, or Real Estate and Insurance. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN BANKING AND FINANCE 
JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



ACC 300 Administrative Accounting FIN 350 Bank Administration 

or ACC 301 Intermediate Accounting3 FIN 355 Problems in Bank Admin. . 

ECO 301, 302 Statistics I, II 6 FIN 352 Principles of Investments... 

ECO 330 Money and Public Policy ... 3 FIN 462 Security Analysis 

FIN 389 Business Finance 3 FIN 480 Financial Management 

GBA 375 Managerial Communications . 3 MGT 485 Administrative Policy 

MGT 360 Fundamentals of Mgt 3 Major Electives** 6 

MKT 300 Principles of Marketing 3 ACC 301, 302 Inter. Acctg. I, II 

REI 325 General Insurance 3 ECO 401 Public Finance 

REI 326 Intr. To Actuarial Sci. or FIN 320 Personal Finance 

MAT 312 Applied Math for Business3 FIN 472 International Finance 

Directed Elective* 3 RFI 432 Real Estate Finance 

Elective A 

33 31 

Total: 128 

**Any of these or other courses approved by chairman. 



66/College of Business Administration 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

ACC 300 Administrative Accounting. .. 3 

ECO 301 , 302 Statistics I, II 6 

ECO 330 Money and Public Policy ... 3 

FIN 389 Business Finance 3 

GBA 375 Managerial Communications . 3 

MGT 360 Fundamentals of Mgt 3 

MKT 300 Principles of Marketing 3 

Math or Science Elective 3 

REI 325 General Insurance or 

RFI 330 Real Estate Principles 3 

Directed Elective* 3 



33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

ECO 335 Economics of the Firm and 
one 300 or above course 6 

FIN 350 Bank Administration or 
FIN 352 Principles of Investments 
or FIN 480 Financial Management . . 3 

GBA 415 Government and Business ...3 

MGT 364 Personnel Management or 
MGT 454 Human Relations and one 
300 or above course 6 

MKT 428 Marketing Management 3 

REI 325 General Insurance or 

REI 330 Principles of Real Estate ... 3 

Electives .!_ 

31 
Total: 128 



'Behavioral science, computer science, social science, or mathematics 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

ACC 300 Administrative Accounting ... 3 ECO 330 Money and Public Policy ...3 

ECO 301, 302 Statistics I, II 6 Courses selected from the following . . 18 

FIN 389 Business Finance 3 REAL ESTATE GROUP: (Min. of two) 

GBA 375 Managerial Communications . 3 REI 310 Land Resource Principles 

MGT 360 Fundamentals of Mgt 3 REI 334 Residential Val 

MKT 300 Principles of Marketing 3 REI 340 Real Estate Law 

REI 325 General Insurance 3 REI 345 Property Management 

REI 330 Principles of Real Estate 3 REI 432 Real Estate Finance 

REI 326 Intr. to Actuarial Sci. or REI 434 Income Property Valuation 

MAT 312 Applied Math for Business 3 REI 460 Real Estate Development 

Directed Elective* 3 INSURANCE GROUP: (Min. of two) 

REI 326 Intr. to Actuarial Sci.*** 
REI 425 Life Insurance 
REI 445 Property and Liability Ins. 
REI 450 Health Insurance 

MGT 485 Administrative Policy 6 

Elective 4 



33 



TOTAL: 



31 
128 



•May not be used in major if chosen in place of MAT 312. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT 

Roy N. Moore, Chairman 

Boothe, Bracey, Brooking, J.L. Davis, Etzold, Gottleber, V. Hill, 

Stegenga 

The program of study in management has three objectives: ( 1 ) to provide students with 

concepts, knowledge, and skills required in the effective management of profit-making 

enterprises, government institutions, and non-profit service organizations; (2) to prepare 

the student for employment which will lead to positions of managerial responsibility; and 

(3) to make available to students pursuing technical, educational, and professional careers 



Marketing/67 

training in general management to apply in their specialized fields. 

Students interested in management may major in either industrial or personnel 
management. The industrial management option places emphasis on manufacturing and 
production problems such as product engineering, manufacturing methods and equipment, 
plant layout, production planning, and quality control. The personnel management option 
emphasizes the human problems of administration including union-management relations, 
manpower development, compensation, and managerial communications. 

Careers in management are available in industry, government, service organizations, 
and teaching. Beginning employment opportunities for which the management graduates 
are trained include such jobs as line supervisor, production scheduler and dispatcher, time 
study, employment interviewer, training supervisor, and management trainees. Their broad 
education and training will, when coupled with additional maturity and experience, serve to 
further their careers in more responsible management positions such as production or plant 
manager, labor relations director, or personnel administrator. 

The recommended minor in Management for a non-business major is ECO 255, MGT 
360, and four courses in the Management Department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Accounting 300 3 

Economics 301 , 302, 330 9 

Finance 389 3 

General Business 

Administration 375 3 

Management 360, 364 6 

Marketing 300 3 

Electives— advanced mathematics, 

behavioral science, speech 

communications, or 

English 6 



33 



Management 386, 454, 465, 

468, 472, 484 

Management 485 

General Electives 



TOTAL: 



31 
128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 300 3 

Economics 301 , 302, 330 9 

Finance 389 3 

General Business 

Administration 375 3 

Management 360, 386, 464 9 

Marketing 300 3 

Mathematics 312 ._3 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education 323 3 

Management 465, 454, or 

468, 467, 472, 476, 482 18 

Management 485 3 

General Electives 7 



TOTAL: 



31 

128 



DEPARTMENT OF MARKETING 

Thomas T. Ivy, Chairman 
Loyd, Pritchett, Schoell, T. Smith, W. Smith, Vreeland 
Marketing is a major concern of all businesses and a growing number of non-profit 
organizations. The goals of the marketing program are to: (1) prepare students for entry- 
level positions in marketing; (2) provide the background necessary to advance to higher 



68/College of Business Administration 

level marketing management positions, and (3) develop executive skills that are critical for 
success in all business occupations. It is necessary, therefore, that the student not only learn 
marketing concepts but that he/she develops the ability to: (1) think creatively; (2) solve 
problems; (3) communicate orally and in writing; and (4) understand and work with people. 

Marketing courses are taught in such a way that the student obtains a thorough 
knowledge of marketing principles and techniques and develops the executive skills needed 
to apply them in the business world. 

Upon graduation, marketing majors obtain employment as sales representatives, 
advertising technical or managerial personnel, and retail store owners, managers, or 
buyers. With experience or graduate training, graduates move into marketing research, 
product management, or marketing management positions. Career opportunities are 
numerous since more than half of all American workers are employed in the marketing of 
products and services. 

For a student not majoring in tbe College of Business Administration, a minor in 
Marketing may be earned by completing eighteen (18) hours of courses in the following 
recommended sequence: 

Hours 

MKT 300 3 

MKT 330, 342, 355 9 

MKT 430, 442, 455 (select one) 3 

One other marketing elective .3 

Total 18 

Students in the department may major in Marketing Management, Advertising, or 
Sales Management by completing one of the following programs: 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MARKETING MANAGEMENT 

The Marketing Management major is a flexible program which allows students to 
select a general marketing curriculum or to concentrate in retail management. 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Accounting 300 3 Finance 389 3 

Economics 301 , 302, 330 9 Management 485 3 

Management 360 3 Marketing 424, 428 6 

Marketing 300, 322 6 Select Two 6 

Select Two 6 Marketing 365, 380, 455, 495 

Marketing 342, 330, 355 Select One 3 

*Directed Electives (Select two from Marketing 430, 458, 442 

behavioral science, social science, *Electives 10 

mathematics (Math 312 is 
recommended), or computer science) . ^6 

33 31 

TOTAL: 128 

♦Students planning a career in retailing "Courses selected must be approved by chairman, 

should take CSS 342. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SALES MANAGEMENT 

The Sales Management major is designed to prepare students for professional sales 
and sales management positions with major manufacturers, wholesalers, and multinational 
corporations. The course sequence specifies courses which are geared to the skills and 
knowledge necessary to enter these fields. 



Marketing/69 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 300 3 

Economics 301 , 302, 330 9 

Management 360 3 

Marketing 300, 322, 330, 355 12 

Directed Electives (Select two from 
behavioral science, social science 
mathematics, computer science, or other 

courses approved by chairman) ^6 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Finance 389 3 

Management 485 3 

Marketing 342, 424, 428, 430 12 

Select One: 

Marketing365, 380, 495 3 

'Electives 10 



TOTAL: 



31 
128 



•Courses selected must be approved by chairman. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ADVERTISING 

This is an interdisciplinary major offered by the Department of Marketing in conjunc- 
tion with the Department of Radio, Television, and Film and the Department of Jour- 
nalism, College of Liberal Arts. 

Students majoring in Advertising take a more specialized program than the marketing 
major to prepare them for the exacting requirements for an advertising career. Advertising 
graduates are employed as account executives, copy writers, promotional managers, and 
advertising managers for firms in retailing and manufacturing. 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 300 3 

Economics 301 , 302, 330 9 

Management 360 3 

Marketing 300, 322, 355 9 

Radio-Television-Film 330 3 

"Directed Electives (Select two from 
behavioral science, social science, 
mathematics, or computer science).. ^6 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Finance 389 3 

Journalism 331 3 

Management 485 3 

Marketing 365, 424, 455, 458 12 

Select One: 

Radio- Television-Film 311, 

340, 431 3 

'Electives .!_ 

31 
TOTAL: 128 



'Courses selected must be approved by chairman. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 
ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 

Department Major Emphasis Degree* 1 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

BILINGUAL SECRETARIAL STUDIES BS 

BUSINESS EDUCATION BS 

OFFICE MANAGEMENT BS 

Distributive Education 
Executive Secretarial Studies 
SECRETARIAL TRAINING A 

COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELOR EDUCATION 

SOCIAL AND REHABILITATION SERVICES* BS 

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION BS 

Early Childhood Education 
Middle Grades Education 
Nursery/Early Childhood Education 
SECONDARY EDUCATION* BS 

INDUSTRIAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS* BS 

INDUSTRIAL MECHANICS* BS 

INDUSTRIAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION BS 

Secondary Trades and Industry 
Post-Secondary Trades and 

Industry 
Technical Education 
(ARTS AND CRAFTS)*** 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYCHOLOGY BA, BS 

General Psychology 
Pre-Professional Psychology 
Teaching Psychology 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

SPECIAL EDUCATION BS 

Blind/Visually Impaired 
Crippled and Health Impaired 
Mental Retardation 
Special Learning Disabilities 



•Minor Available 
••Degree Abbreviations: (BA) Bachelor of Arts, (BS) Bachelor of Science, (A) Two- Year Certificate 
•••Minor Only Available 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Bobby D. Anderson, Dean 
Gary S. Rush, Assistant Dean 
The University of Southern Mississippi, through its College of Education and 
Psychology, holds membership in the American Association of Colleges for Teacher 
Education. All undergraduate programs in teacher education are fully accredited by the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). For details of 
graduate teacher education programs, consult the Graduate Bulletin. For degrees offered 
by each department, please see page 70. 

PURPOSES 

The purposes of the College of Education and Psychology are: (1) to prepare teachers 
for the public schools and the colleges and universities; (2) to offer non-teaching degree 
programs on the undergraduate level in business education, industrial mechanics, 
psychology, and social and rehabilitation services (for graduate level non-teaching degree 
programs consult the Graduate Bulletin); (3) to provide clinical and professional services to 
the public schools of Mississippi and to the University; and (4) to promote educational and 
psychological research. 

These purposes are achieved through: (1) the work of the various departments in the 
College; (2) clinics and offices for professional services; (3) cooperation with the public 
schools; and (4) cooperation with other colleges and schools of the University in the 
development of teacher education programs that meet requirements for Mississippi cer- 
tification and NCATE approval. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Any student who satisfies admission requirements to the University of Southern 
Mississippi through the Office of Admissions is eligible for admission to the College of 
Education and Psychology. 

An Application for Admission (Form A7) must be approved by the Dean of the Col- 
lege of Education and Psychology and be filed in this office. 

The above criteria for admission applies to beginning freshman students, transfer 
students from within the University of Southern Mississippi, and transfer students from 
another college or university. 

Admission to the College of Education and Psychology does not constitute admission 
to a teacher education program nor to a non-teaching major program. Program planning 
and proper advisement must be completed to gain admission to both Teacher Education 
Programs and Non-Teaching Programs. 

Regular status in the College of Education and Psychology is maintained by meeting 
the quality point requirements for hours completed as designated by the general University 
requirement and evaluated by the Registrar's Office. 

General Core, College of Education and Psychology 

All students (teaching and non-teaching) are required to satisfy the requirements of the 
General Core, College of Education and Psychology. Exceptions must be approved by the 
department chairman and the Dean of the College. 

General Core 

Hours 

English 101, 102, and two other English courses 

200 level or above except ENG 300 and ENG 333 12 

History 101 , and 102, or 140 and 141 6 

Social Sciences 6 



72/College of Education and Psychology 

Elect two courses from the following for 6 hours (no more than 3 hours from any 
area): 

Anthropology Political Science 

Economics Sociology 

Geography Religion (non-teaching 

Philosophy majors only) 

Hours 

Science 12 

Biological Science— 6 hours 

Physical Science — 6 hours 

(All non-science majors may take the 

Fundamentals of Science series.) 

Mathematics 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Fine Art 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

Physical Education/ROTC/AFROTC 3 

Students are required to take physical activity courses during the freshman year. Freshman students may elect 
ROTC/AFROTC I in lieu of the physical education requirement. Students participating in varsity athletics, Marching 
Band, Dixie Darlings, Cheer Leaders, or Pom Pon girls may substitute this for required physical education. Persons with 
military experience and holders of AA degrees are exempt from physical education activity courses. 

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND REQUIREMENTS 

One of the primary functions of the College of Education and Psychology is that of 
coordinating the teacher education programs for the University. The following objectives 
were formulated to carry out adequately this function: 

1 . Attract those students who desire to make teaching a career. 

2. Acquaint prospective teachers with all phases of the profession through the tutelage 
of a competent College staff. 

3. Provide programs of basic studies and pre-teaching activities which will insure a 
minimally acceptable level of teaching knowledge and skill in an area of specializa- 
tion within each student. 

4. Make available to students the educational resources and support services needed to 
complement their instructional program. 

5. Maintain a continuous counseling service which will help to guide students in the 
proper selection of courses for their personal and professional development. 

6. Sustain an orderly system of selecting and retaining those individuals who perform 
at or above those standards required by the Teacher Education Council. 

7. Encourage both instructors and students in the various classes to visit and observe 
local schools in day-to-day operations. 

8. Study, screen, and assign students to school classrooms where qualified teachers 
can provide certain pre-teaching experiences. 

9. Aid students in obtaining state certification in their area or areas of specialization. 

10. Help students make appropriate career decisions. 

11. Provide prospective employers with proper information regarding the student's 
performance at the University. 

12. Utilize a system of follow-up on each student's performance as a classroom 
teacher. 

13. Make staff members available to local school inservice programs which are design- 
ed especially for staff and/or curriculum improvement. 



Criteria for Admission to Teacher Education Programs 

All applicants for admission to a program leading to teacher certification must be ap- 
proved by the Screening Committee. 



Teacher Education/73 

Freshman and sophomores who have indicated a desire to pursue a Teacher Education 
Program will be notified at the proper time for filing the Program Plan-Teaching Form. 
Application for admission to a teacher education program is accomplished by: 

1 . Obtaining the Program Plan-Teaching Form (Ed 8a) from the College of Education 
and Psychology Dean's Office. 

2. Filling out this form properly with the major adviser and the help of an education 
adviser. 

3. Having this form checked and turned into the designated adviser in the Department 
of Curriculum and Instruction. 

4. Having the Curriculum and Instruction adviser forward the Program Plan- 
Teaching Form to the Dean's Office, College of Education and Psychology. 

Upon receiving the required forms, the Dean's Office will initiate a file on the student. 

Once this sequence is accomplished successfully, a T.E. should be evidenced each 
semester on the Registration Appointment Form. This symbol indicates to all advisers in- 
volved that an approved program plan for teaching certification has been checked and filed 
in the College of Education and Psychology Dean's Office. 

Criteria which must be met for tentative approval include the following: 

1 . An overall 2.2 grade point average. 

2. At least a C average in first year English. (If this is not met, ENG 332 must be taken 
to remove the deficiency. If ENG 332 is taken to remove the deficiency, the course 
may not then be used toward the twelve (12) semester hours of required English.) 

3. Acceptable physical health status. 

4. Emotional stability. 

5. Satisfactory personal characteristics. 

Criteria for Completion of Teacher Education Programs 

All teacher candidates must complete all graduation requirements set forth in the 
general University regulations as well as: (1) complete all program requirements as set forth 
in the official Program Plan (Ed 8a); (2) earn a grade of C or higher in all professional 
education courses included in the respective teaching program. 

Teaching Certification 

Students preparing to teach must choose a teaching area from one of the following: 
Elementary Education (N-3, K-3, K-8, 4-8, 4-12); 
Secondary Education (7-12), or Special Areas (K-12). 
To prepare for a career in secondary education the student will major in an academic 
area and fulfill the general and professional requirements listed under the Secondary 
Education Section (see Department of Curriculum and Instruction). 

Additionally, the National Teacher's Examination must be taken by all who seek a 
teaching certificate. 

Requirements for Teaching Degrees 

Students preparing to teach usually pursue the Bachelor of Science degree through the 
College of Education and Psychology. However, students preparing as teachers at the 
secondary school level may choose to pursue the Bachelor of Arts degree through the Col- 
lege of Education and Psychology provided the degree is offered for the major in the col- 
lege or school offering the major. It is permissible for a student to graduate from any col- 
lege or school that offers a teaching major if the student prefers. However, all students who 
desire to become teachers must apply for admission to the Teacher Education Program in 
the College of Education and Psychology and be screened according to the preceding 
outlines procedures for admission to the program. 

Requirements for Non-Teaching Degrees 

The College of Education and Psychology offers major programs in psychology, of- 
fice management, executive secretarial studies, bilingual secretarial studies, social and 
rehabilitation services, and industrial vocational areas leading to the Bachelor of Science 



74/CoIlege of Education and Psychology 

non-teaching degree. Students in psychology may take programs leading to the Bachelor of 
Arts degree. 

Bachelor of Arts (Non-Teaching) 

The requirements for the Bachelor of Arts non-teaching degree are the same as those 
for the Bachelor of Science non-teaching degree with one exception. Students in the 
Bachelor of Arts program must complete six (6) to nine (9) hours in a foreign language. 
Those students who have completed two years of the same language in high school and who 
make satisfactory placement test scores may meet the language requirement by completing 
six (6) semester hours in the same language at the 200 level or above. 

Major Requirements and Electives 

Students should consult with their major departments concerning the major and/or 
minor requirements and electives which constitute the balance of the degree requirements. 



SPECIAL SCHOOL SERVICES 

Office of Student Teaching 

Willie E. Cooley, Director 

The basic purpose of the student teacher program is to provide all students in teacher 
education with opportunities that will assist them in developing the skills and competencies 
necessary for a beginning teacher. The student teaching program provides an environment 
for a realistic evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of prospective teachers. 

All student teaching is done in off-campus cooperating schools designated by the 
Director of Student Teaching. Supervision is provided by cooperating school personnel and 
faculty members of the University. 

Each student must follow the procedure listed below in submitting his/her application 
for student teaching. 

Requirements for Student Teaching 
APPLICATION: 

Formal application must be submitted to the Office of Student Teaching at the beginn- 
ing of the semester prior to the student teaching semester. Assignments are made by Oc- 
tober 1 and March 1. Summer months are not included as there is no regular student 
teaching during the summer. 

All student teachers: 

1 . Must have completed a minimum of eighty-eight (88) semester hours of college 
work. 

2. Must have completed a minimum of sixteen (16) semester hours in their major field, 
six (6) of which must have been taken in residence in this institution. 

3. Must have at least a 2.2 overall average at the time they submit their application. 

4. Must have been admitted to a teacher education program for at least six (6) months. 

5. Must expect to spend the required time in an off-campus school designated by the 
Director of Student Teaching. 

Students in art, music, physical education, and special education may elect to student 
teach for an entire semester. The student would student teach at more than one academic 
level and receive twelve (12) semester hours credit. 

STUDENT TEACHING SEMESTER: Candidates for student teaching must submit 
documented evidence of a 2.2 overall average at time of registration. 

Candidates for student teaching in the elementary school must have completed the 
following courses— REF 300, CIE 301 , 305, 306, 309, 343 or 425; EPY 370, 374; and SCE 
432. 

Candidates for student teaching in the secondary school must have completed CIS 313, 
REF 300, EPY 372 and 374, and appropriate special methods courses listed as CIS 451 — 
465. 



Teacher Education/75 

Regulations for Admission to Student Teaching Seminar 

CIE 489 and CIS 495 

Student teaching for inservice teachers will be offered each summer for six (6) semester 
hours. To be eligible for this course: 

1. The applicant shall submit evidence of two years teaching experience and recom- 
mendation from a principal or superintendent under whom the applicant has 
worked. 

2. The applicant shall present evidence of a contract for the coming school year. 

3. The applicant shall have previously earned twelve (12) semester hours from this in- 
stitution and shall not be on probation. 

4. The applicant must be in an undergraduate degree program at this institution. 

5. The applicant must be teaching in Mississippi. 

6. The applicant must meet all the requirements for student teaching. 

7. Permission to enroll in these classes shall be granted by the Director of Student 
Teaching following an interview with the applicant. 

8. Application for inservice student teaching must be made in the Student Teaching 
Office by March 30. 

Educational Media Center 

Lee Jones, Director 
Garcia 
In order to be of service to the schools of Mississippi and to provide higher standards 
of teacher education, the University has established the Educational Media and Technology 
program. The program provides courses in instructional media selection, utilization, and 
preparation for teacher education. Master's and specialist's degree programs leading to 
Mississippi A A and AAA certification are offered. 

The academic program encompasses graduate and undergraduate offerings. Basic 
courses are designed to provide an overview for prospective teachers and Library Media 
specialists, while advanced courses are designed to provide supplementary training for 
teachers, administrators and other school personnel. 

The program includes the operation of a curriculum materials center for the College of 
Education and Psychology, and laboratories for teaching the use of audiovisual equipment 
and for the production of instructional audiovisual materials. 

The program's staff specializes in utilization, production and management of Educa- 
tional Media in all forms; and in the design and development of systems for individualized 
instruction. The staff is available to assist local school districts in these areas with faculty 
inservice workshops, extension courses, and consulting services. 
For further information you may contact: 
Director, Educational Media and Technology 
Southern Station, Box 5054 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 
Phone (601) 266-7304 



Psychology Clinic 

Barry Ritzier, Director 

The University of Southern Mississippi, through the Psychology Clinic, affords 
graduate students in psychology opportunities for clinical experience in a psychology prac- 
ticum setting. Training and experience in diagnostic testing, psychological appraisal, 
psychotherapy, behavior modification techniques, and bio feedback are the primary foci of 
the Clinic's function. Work with both children and adults provides doctoral level graduate 
students specializing in the clinical areas with a variety of experiences with different forms 
of maladaptive behavior and learning problems. 

Another major function of the Clinic is to provide psychological services to University 
students, as well as faculty, staff, and their families. Additionally, service to the communi- 
ty and to the state in the form of diagnosis and treatment of emotional and learning pro- 
blems is an important function of the Clinic. 



76/College of Education and Psychology 

Members of the Clinic's staff and the Psychology Department offer consultation to 
other clinics on the campus and work with them on various related problems. 

University students, faculty and staff personnel, public school teachers, physicians, 
and other interested persons may obtain psychological services by applying to the Clinic. 

In ALL cases, student clinicians are closely supervised by Ph.D. clinical psychologists. 

The Reading Center 

Paul B. Borthwick, Coordinator 

The primary responsibility of the Reading Center is in promoting effective teacher 
education for elementary and secondary students in methods, techniques, and materials in 
reading and language arts. Focus of the programs is at the undergraduate, master's and ad- 
vanced graduate levels emphasizing theory, practice, evaluation, and research. The 
Reading Center is able to offer limited services in the diagnosis of reading problems and 
remedial reading to children referred to the Center. The cost of the diagnostic evaluation 
which includes a suggested program of remedial procedures is $35.00, or a proportionate 
part, based on ability to pay. Remedial instruction, provided by a graduate or 
undergraduate student on a limited basis, is $40.00 per semester. 

An up-to-date collection of materials used for elementary, secondary, or adult reading 
instruction and a library of children's books are open for examination. 

University students and adults may obtain testing, counseling, and special instruction 
in the reading areas of comprehension, vocabulary development, and study skills improve- 
ment through enrolling in the Center's "Improvement of Study" course. 

An annual reading conference is held each year in the spring or summer. Nationally 
known reading authorities are featured on the program. 

Bureau of Educational Research 

Richard Kazelskis, Director 

The Bureau of Educational Research is an administrative entity of the Office of the 
Dean, College of Education and Psychology, at the University of Southern Mississippi. The 
primary purpose of the Bureau is to provide research and dissemination services to Univer- 
sity students, faculty, and the public schools within the State of Mississippi. Major func- 
tions include technical assistance in research design and data analysis, coordination of 
faculty research, reporting of research and professional activities of faculty and students, 
and independent evaluation of special projects and programs within the College of Educa- 
tion and Psychology. 

The Bureau has developed a system of computer programs available for the treatment 
and analysis of data and provides training and assistance in the utilization of electronic 
calculators for more limited data treatment requirements. In addition, special services 
relative to measurement instruments and other specialized research tools are provided. 

Additional information may be obtained by contacting the Director of the Bureau of 
Educational Research. 



Center For Community Education 

William Hetrick, Director 

The Center for Community Education, located in the Department of Educational Ad- 
ministration and Supervision, is part of a national network of over eighty cooperating 
centers, each responsible for promoting Community Education in a specific geographic 
area. Founded in 1974, the Center at the University of Southern Mississippi serves the State 
of Mississippi through: 

....disseminating information on the Community Education concept through 
brochures and informational hand-outs, films, slides, and formal presentations. 

....providing advice and technical assistance to community colleges, school districts, 
communities and individual schools wishing to start Community Education. 

....providing for the training needs. Included herein is the training of professional per- 
sonnel who administer Community School programs plus in-service training for staff 
members and community members. 



Community Education/77 

For further information, contact: 
Dr. William Hetrick, Director 
Center for Community Education 
Southern Station, Box 5027 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 
Phone 601 -266-7 1 70 or 7 1 7 1 

Counseling Laboratory 

Ben Hutton, Director 
The Counseling Laboratory, in the Department of Counseling Psychology and 
Counselor Education, is designed to assist individuals whose problems fall within the 
realms of educational planning, vocational or career decision-making, personal-social ad- 
justment, and marriage and family counseling. It serves two purposes: (1) to offer profes- 
sional service to persons seeking such services and (2) to provide qualified graduate students 
the opportunity to observe and apply theoretical concepts. 

The Laboratory is available to anyone of any age, students or general public, whose 
problems fall within the scope of the services outlined above. These services are not 
restricted to any particular area nor to any particular group. 

The staff of the Counseling Laboratory is composed of members of the teaching facul- 
ty of the Department of Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education and graduate 
students under their supervision. 

Write, telephone, or contact in person: 
Dr. Ben Hutton, Director 
Counseling Laboratory 
Southern Station, Box 9327 
Hattiesburg, MS 39401 
Phone: 266-7151 or 7163 

Children's Laboratory of Learning 

Patricia Jobe, Director 

The Children's Laboratory of Learning is a part of the Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction. It provides a three-fold purpose: (1) a half-day kindergarten program for 5- 
year-old children; (2) a site for graduate and undergraduate teacher training in methods and 
materials used in Early Childhood Education; and (3) a site for approved research projects 
conducted by graduate students and faculty and for adjunct services offered in the Speech 
and Hearing Clinic, the Department of Special Education, the Department of Physical 
Education, and other colleges and schools within the University. 

Staff members are available for consultation services, inservice workshops, and off- 
campus courses. 



Applied Gerontology Educational Services 

W. Lee Pierce, Coordinator 
The University of Southern Mississippi's Office of Applied Gerontology Education 
Services exists to coordinate the following University functions in the field of gerontology: 

1 . Graduate education for professionals. 

2. Staff development programs for professionals and paraprofessionals. 

3. Consultation and community services. 

4. Research. 

5. Sensitization of the general public to the status and future of the elderly in the com- 
munity. 

For further information, contact: 
Dr. W. Lee Pierce, Coordinator 
Applied Gerontology Education Services 
Southern Station, Box 8328 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 
Phone (601) 266-4147 



78/ColIege of Education and Psychology 

DEPARTMENT OF ADULT EDUCATION 

W. Lee Pierce, Acting Chairman 
L. Baker, Hoffman, Olsen, Saucier, Weare 

The Department of Adult Education offers graduate programs for persons who work 
with adult learners in a wide variety of settings. Programs are provided which lead to the 
master's, specialist's, and doctoral degrees. For descriptions of these programs, please con- 
sult the Graduate Bulletin. 

Some courses are offered at the undergraduate level to support degree programs in 
other departments and as staff training for agencies that employ persons at the bac- 
calaureate level or below to work with adult students. 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 

L. Annelle Bonner, Chairman 
M. Borthwick, Conerly, C. Lewis, Mays, G. Taylor 

The Department of Business Education offers curricula in business teacher education, 
office management, distributive-teacher education, two four-year programs in executive 
secretarial studies, one of which has bilingual emphasis, and a two-year program leading to 
a specialized certificate in secretarial training.* 

The student who plans to teach business subjects or distributive education on the high 
school level will follow the curriculum prescriptions which lead to the Bachelor of Science 
teaching degree. He will enroll in the College of Education and Psychology. He must meet 
the admission requirements for the College. His major field of concentration will be in 
business subject matter or distributive education prescribed by the Department of Business 
Education. The professional education and psychology requirements constitute the minor. 

A student interested in becoming a legal or a medical secretary can get increased em- 
phasis in the professional field chosen through consultation with an adviser who will make 
necessary minor changes in the Executive Secretarial Studies program. 

•Other specialized emphases are legal secretaryship and medical secretarship. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN BUSINESS TEACHER EDUCATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRST SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS^ 

English 101, 102 6 Accounting 201, 202 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104, 105 6 Allied Arts 100 3 

Geography 103, Philosophy 151, Business Education 102, 202 6 

Political Science 101 , Sociology 101 , Economics 255, 256 6 

310, or 311 (select one) 3 English (Inter, and Junior Writing 6 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 Fundamentals of Science 106, 107 6 

History 101, 102, or 140, 141 6 Speech Communication 111 3 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Physical Education 2 

Psychology 110 ^ 

32 36 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Accounting 300 3 Business Education 354, 452, 453, 

Business Education 300, 302, 305, 310, 460, 485 14 

352, 450, 472 20 Educational Foundations 400 3 

Educational Psychology 372, 374 6 Research and Foundation 469 3 

General Business Administration 295... 3 Secondary Ed. 313, 422, 451, 481.... 18 

Secondary Education 310 3 

Special Education 400 .J3 

38 38 

TOTAL: 144 



Business Education/79 
REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN OFFICE MANAGEMENT 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Fundamentals of Science 6 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

History 101, 102, or 140, 141 6 

Physical Education 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Sociology 101, 210; Geography 103; 

Political Science 101 ^ 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 300 3 

Business Education 300, 310, 352 8 

Economics 330 3 

Elective 3 

Finance 301 3 

General Business Admin. 295, 311 6 

Management 360 3 

Marketing 300 ^3 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 201 , 202 6 

Business Education 102 3 

Economics 255, 256 6 

English 6 

Fundamentals of Science 3 

Mathematics 101 or 120, 112 6 

Psychology 25 1 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

36 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Business Education 354, 450, 460, 

480, 485 14 

Elective 2 

Management 364, 454, 468, 484 12 



TOTAL: 



28 
128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN BILINGUAL 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

(SECOND MAJOR IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE) 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 

Business Education 101 , 102 6 

English 101, 102 6 

Foreign Language 3 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

Mathematics 101 or 112, 120 6 

Physical Education 2 

Speech Communication 111 or 210... 1 3 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Business Education 201 , 202 6 

Economics 255, 256 6 

English 6 

Foreign Language 9 

Fundamentals of Science 6 

History 101, 102, or 380, 381 6 



39 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 201 , 202 6 

Anthropology 315 3 

Business Education 305, 310, 450 9 

Finance 301 or 389 3 

Foreign Language 9 

Fundamentals of Science 3 

General Business Administration 295 ... 3 

Geography 403 or 404 .J3 

39 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Business Education 300, 352, 354, 

460, 472, 480, 485 19 

Economics 330 3 

Foreign Language 9 

Political Science 434, 458 6 



TOTAL: 



37 
147 



80/College of Education and Psychology 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SECRETARIAL TRAINING 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Accounting 201 , 202 6 

Business Education 102, 202, 305 9 

English 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Political Science 101, History 101 or 
102, Sociology 101, Geography 103, 

or Psychology 1 10 (select one) 3 

Physical Education 2 

Speech Communication 111 /h 

32 



Business Education 300, 310, 352, 

354, 360, 450, 460, 472, 485 

Economics 255 

English , 

General Business Administration 295 



TOTAL: 



34 
66 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN BUSINESS EDUCATION WITH AN 
EMPHASIS IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 

Business Education 101 or 102 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104, 105 6 

Geography 103, Philosophy 151, 
Political Science 301, Sociology 101 

or 3 1 1 (select one) 3 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

History 101, 102, or 140, 141 6 

Physical Education /I 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 201 , 202 6 

Economics 255, 256 6 

English (Inter, and Junior Writing) 6 

Fundamentals of Science 106, 107 6 

Management 360 3 

Marketing 300 3 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 



39 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Business Education 300, 302, 352, 

451,452,454 17 

Educational Foundations 400 3 

Educational Psychology 372, 374 6 

Marketing 330, 355 6 

Secondary Education 310 3 

Special Education 400 ^3 

38 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Business Ed. 340, 453, 455, 460 11 

Marketing 342 3 

Research and Foundations 469 3 

Secondary Education 3 1 3 , 422, 45 1 , 48 1 . 1 8 



TOTAL: 



35 
144 



Requirements for an Emphasis in Executive Secretarial Studies 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104, 105 6 

History 101 , 102, or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 120, 1 12, or 101 6 

Political Science 101 or Sociology 101 

or Geography 1 03 3 

Physical Education /I 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Accounting 201 , 202 6 

Business Education 102, 202 6 

Economics 255 3 

English 6 

Fundamentals of Science 106 

Health and Safety Education 101 

Psychology 110 

Speech Communication 111 ._ 

3 



Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education/81 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 300 3 Business Education 360, 450, 460, 

Business Education 300, 302, 305, 310, 472, 480, 485 18 

352, 354 16 Economics 330 3 

Economics 256 3 Electives 8 

Finance 301 or 389 3 

General Business Administration 295, 3116 

Marketing 300 JJ _ 

34 29 

TOTAL: 128 

DEPARTMENT OF COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY AND 
COUNSELOR EDUCATION 

John D. Alcorn, Chairman 

Burch, Culberson, Daniels, Durkee, Gutsch, Hollandsworth 

Hutton, Probst, Randolph, Shafer, J. Stevens, Sturgis 

The Department of Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education offers both 
graduate and undergraduate programs. At the graduate level, seperate curricula are offered 
to prepare students for positions in elementary and secondary school, college, and com- 
munity agency settings. See the Graduate Bulletin for course patterns of each curriculum. 
The department offers work leading to the Master of Education in School Counseling; the 
Master of Science in College Counseling and in Counseling Psychology; and the specialist's 
degree in Counseling and Guidance. A doctoral program is offered in Counseling 
Psychology. The course pattern included in the Master of Education program in School 
Counseling will meet Mississippi State Department of Education requirements for AA cer- 
tification as a school counselor. 

The undergraduate curriculum provides an inter-departmental major in Social and 
Rehabilitation Services. Alternate emphases are offered within the major. The Counseling 
Associate emphasis is designed primarily as entry-level preparation for students planning to 
enter positions in agencies or institutions providing rehabilitative, social, or mental health 
services. Pre-professional emphases are offered which prepare students for entering profes- 
sional graduate training programs in counseling psychology, rehabilitation, or social work. 
Other undergraduate courses are offered as introductions to aspects of counseling and per- 
sonnel work and may be used as electives subject to the approval of program advisers in the 
respective departments. 

The program in Social and Rehabilitation Services includes 33 semester hours in social 
and rehabilitation services courses, 9 semester hours in sociology courses (excluding in- 
troduction), and 9 semester hours in psychology courses (excluding introduction). In addi- 
tion to the 53 hours in Core Requirements for the College of Education and Psychology 
other courses include 9 semester hours in special areas and 17 hours in electives. A minor is 
not required; however, the student may choose a minor in a related area, in which 
case, courses under the interdepartmental major may be used in the minor area. It is 
necessary to include at least 18 semester hours in such a minor. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SOCIAL 
AND REHABILITATION SERVICES 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 , 102 6 English 203,204 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104, 105 6 Fundamentals of Science 106, 107 6 

History 101 & 102 or 140 & 141 6 Psychology 110 3 

Mathematics 101 or 1 20 3 Health 101 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Sociology 101 3 



82/College of Education and Psychology 

Allied Arts 100 or Art Education 207 . 3 *Special Area Courses 6 

Public Address 111 3 Electives 6 

Physical Education /2 

32 33 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS 

Social & Rehabilitation Services: Social & Rehabilitation Services: 

CPY 310, 360, 311, 312, 361, 413 .18 CPY 423 or 430, 431, 433 or 435 

Psychology 251 or 310, 375 6 462 & 463 15 

**Sociology 6 Psychology 436 3 

Electives 3 **Sociology 3 

♦Special Area Course 3 

Electives ^8 

33 32 

TOTAL: 128 

♦Special area courses may be chosen from business education, management, marketing, finance, special educa- 
tion, criminal justice, child development, or adult education. 
"Sociology courses are chosen to correspond to student's individual vocational objectives. 



DEPARTMENT OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

Milton B. Baxter, Chairman 

Bobby D. Moore, Coordinator, Elementary Education 

Johnny R. Purvis, Coordinator, Seconday Education 

Allen, F. Anderson, Arnold, Blanchard, P. Borthwick, Carmichael, 

Cooley, J.C. Davis, P. Dennis, Fruge', Gibson, Hensley, Jobe, S. Johnson, Lee, McNinch, 

Manly, Mastzal, W. Miller, Mottley, Noble, H. Peddicord, L. Posey, Rains, 

Rees, Richmond, Thompson, J.L. Young 

JOINT ASSIGNMENT WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTS: Pawlowski, English; I. 

Brown, Science Education; Wiggins, Journalism; Shands, Speech Communication; 

Dunigan, R.W. King, and Mullins, Mathematics; Hunter, Industrial and Vocational 

Education; Buschner, Health, Physical Education, and Recreation; Neumann, Foreign 

Languages; Bowman, Art; Bonner, Business Education. 



Serving as the coordinating agency within the University for the training and prepara- 
tion of elementary and secondary teachers, the Department of Curriculum and Instruction 
provides undergraduate work for both preservice and inservice teachers. A description of 
the undergraduate programs in elementary and secondary education follows. Please consult 
the Graduate Bulletin for a description of the programs leading to master's, specialist's, 
and doctor's degrees. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Students pursuing a major in elementary education must fulfill the requirements for 
one of the following three emphasis areas: ( 1 ) Nursery-Early Childhood Education (nursery 
school through grade three), (2) Early Childhood Education (kindergarten through three), 
(3) Comprehensive Elementary Education (kindergarten through grade eight). 

Admission to Elementary Education Programs 

Students desiring to major in Elementary Education must meet the following criteria 
before being admitted to any program in elementary education: 

1. Overall 2.2 GPA 

2. C average in Freshman English 



Elementary Education/83 

3. Complete thirty (30) hours of recent observation in an elementary classroom (See 
Coordinator, Elementary Education Programs, EPB 108-F) 

4. Show competence in Mathematics Placement Test (See Coordinator, Elementary 
Education Programs, EPB 108-F) 

A modified program is available for elementary education majors who wish to obtain 
basic certification in the middle grades (4-8) as well as additional certification in one or 
more teaching areas at the secondary school level (7- 12). Interested students should contact 
the Coordinator of Elementary Education for further information. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art Education 207 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Fundamentals of 

Science 131, 132 6 

Health and Safety 

Education 101 3 

History 101 or 140 3 

Mathematics 210 3 

Physical Education 

(activity) 1 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech Communication 111 /$ 

31 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art Education 309 3 

Educational Psychology 

370, 374 6 

English 301 , Literature 6 

Fundamentals of Science 

133, 134 6 

History 102 or 141 3 

Mathematics 310 3 

Physical Education (activity) 1 

Social Science Electives 6 



34 



K-3 Emphasis 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Curriculum and 

Instruction-Elementary 

300, 301, 305, 306, 

309, 317 18 

Music Education 361 3 

Physical Education 320 3 

Research and Foundations 

400, 427 6 

Science Education 432 J$ 

33 



Curriculum and 

Instruction-Elementary 
403, 407, 412, 422, 
425, 480 

Research and Foundations 
416 

Special Education 400 



24 



TOTAL(k-3): 



30 

128 



JUNIOR YEAR 



K-8 Emphasis 
SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Curriculum and 
Instruction- 
Elementary 300, 
301, 305, 306, 
309, 317, 425 21 

Music Education 361 3 

Physical Education 



Curriculum and 
Instruction- 
Elementary 403, 407, 
412, 422, 343, and 
480 or 482 24 

Research and Foundations 
400, 416 6 



320 or 321 3 Special Education 400 3 



84/College of Education and Psychology 

Research and Foundations 

469 3 

Science Education 432 ^_3 

33 33 

TOTAL (k-8): 131 

'Students planning to graduate prior to Sept. I, 1981, must follow program outlined in 1979-80 Bulletin (or 
earlier). Any student graduating after Sept. 1, 1981, must follow the 1980-81 Bulletin (or a subsequent one). 
* 'Students desiring to include additional certification in nursery school must add CD 350, CD 351, and FN 363 
or HSE 410 (9 hrs.) to their program. 



SECONDARY TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

(Grades 7-12) 

To qualify for an undergraduate degree with certification to teach at the secondary- 
school level, the student must complete: (1) the requirements of the General Core, College 
of Education and Psychology, (2) an academic major in a field of teacher certification, (3) 
the requirements of the secondary education minor or the secondary education major, and 
(4) any elective requirements necessary to complete the degree program. 



General Core, College of Education and Psychology 

All students seeking certification at the secondary-school level must complete the 
general education requirements listed under the General Core, College of Education and 
Psychology. A student receiving the degree from a college or school other than the College 
of Education and Psychology must also satisfy the core requirements of that college or 
school. 

The specific courses listed below should be taken to satisfy the following general re- 
quirements of the General Core, College of Education and Psychology: Mathematics- 
Mathematics (MAT) 101 or MAT 120 (MAT 210 and MAT 310 may not be used to satisfy 
the mathematics requirement); Science — Fundamentals of Science (FS) 104, 105, 106, and 
107 or equivalent laboratory sciences (FS 131, 132, 133, and 134 may not be used to satisfy 
the science requirement); Fine Arts — Allied Arts (AA) 100 or Music (MUS) 365. 



Academic Major 

Students seeking certification at the secondary-school level must complete the re- 
quirements for an academic major to include all courses (both in the major area and, in 
some instances, related fields) required in a teaching field. Students receiving the bachelor's 
degree after September 1, 1981, must meet the state's new certification requirements for 
secondary-school teachers. For specific course requirements for teacher certification in the 
various majors, students should refer to the section in this Bulletin under their respective 
academic departments. 

Academic majors offered certification in the various teaching fields at the secondary- 
school level are: 

American Studies* Industrial and Vocational 

Biology* Education 

Business Education Journalism 

Chemistry** Latin 

Economics* Mathematics 

English Physics** 

French Political Science* 

Geography* Psychology 

German Science Education** 

History* Social Studies* 



Secondary Education/85 

Home Economics Sociology* 

Education (general sociology major only) 

Industrial Arts Spanish 

Speech Communication 

*The social studies major provides for a broad preparation in the social sciences and certifies the student to teach all of the 
social sciences at the secondary-school level. Specific certification in American studies, economics, geography, history, 
political science, or sociology is not available in Mississippi; however, these majors may receive certification in social 
studies to teach all of the social sciences if their degree program includes the following courses: History (HIS) 101, 102, 
140, 141, and 341 (15 semester hours), economics (6 semester hours), political science (6 semester hours), geography (6 
semester hours), and sociology (3 semester hours). 

♦•Students who plan to teach at the secondary-school level should select the science education major which certifies the 
student to teach one or more sciences and general science. Students who desire to major and certify in one science area on- 
ly (biology, chemistry, or physics) must have the approval of the Chairman of the Department of Science Education. 

Secondary Education Minor 

Students who plan to teach at the secondary-school level must complete the following 
courses (professional education requirements) which serve as the student's minor: Educa- 
tional Psychology (EPY) 372, EPY 374, Research and Foundations (REF) 400, REF 469, 
Curriculum and Instruction: Secondary (CIS) 451-465 (a methods course in the student's 
certification area),*CIS 313 and *CIS 48 1-494. 

•For information concerning the student teaching component, see the section entitled Office of Student Teaching under 
College of Education and Psychology and CIS Course Description Section of this Bulletin . 

In addition to the professional education courses listed above, secondary teacher 
education students graduating after September 1, 1981, must complete the following addi- 
tional courses: Curriculum and Instruction: Secondary (CIS) 310, (CIS) 422, Special 
Education (SPE) 400. 

Students may not enroll in any of the secondary education minor courses shown above 
until they have completed and turned in a Program Plan-Teaching Form to the Coor- 
dinator of Secondary Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, College of 
Education and Psychology. 

Secondary Education Major 

In lieu of the secondary education minor, students who plan to teach at the secondary- 
school level may elect and are encouraged to complete the requirements for a secondary 
education major which consists of the twenty-seven (27) semester hours described under the 
secondary education minor plus the following courses: Curriculum and Instruction: Secon- 
dary (CIS) 310, and Research and Foundations (REF) 416. 

In addition to the professional education courses listed above for the secondary educa- 
tion major, secondary teacher education students graduating after September 1 , 1981 , must 
complete the following additional courses: Curriculum and Instruction: Secondary (CIS) 
422, Special Education (SPE) 400. 

SPECIAL AREA TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

(Grades K-12) 

The following special area teaching degree programs are offered by the College of 
Education and Psychology or in cooperation with other colleges and schools of the Univer- 
sity: 

Art Education Health and Physical 

Education of the Deaf Education 

Library Science Music Education 

Special Education 

Students seeking special area teacher certification must complete the required courses 
in the following components: (1) the General Core, College of Education and Psychology, 
(2) an academic major in the selected teaching area, (3) a professional education compo- 
nent, and (4) any elective requirements necessary to complete the degree program. For 



86/College of Education and Psychology 

specific course requirements for the various components, students should refer to the sec- 
tion in this Bulletin under their respective academic departments or consult the Coordinator 
of Secondary Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, College of Education 
and Psychology. 

Teacher certification requirements for all special areas will change, effective 
September 1, 1981. Degree programs of special area students graduating after this date 
must reflect these changes. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
AND SUPERVISION 

James H. McPhail, Chairman 

B. Anderson, E. Bedenbaugh, Gibson, Ginn, Hetrick, Holloway, Lucas, 

Rush, Southerland, D. Stewart, S. Weatherford, H.S. Williams 

The Department of Educational Administration and Supervision offers programs for 

the preparation of administrators for the public schools and colleges and for teachers of 

educational administration. These preparation programs are offered only at the graduate 

level and lead to the master's degree, the sixth year specialist's degree, and the doctor's 

degree. For a description of these programs, consult the Graduate Bulletin . 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL AND VOCATIONAL 
EDUCATION 

William B. Burns, Chairman 
Baron, Boyte, Hunter, Lackey, M. Lanmon 

The Department of Industrial and Vocational Education offers a curriculum leading to 
the Bachelor of Science degree with majors in Industrial Mechanics (non-teaching), In- 
dustrial Arts, and Industrial and Vocational Education. The department also offers pro- 
grams leading to the Master of Science degree with majors in either Industrial Arts or In- 
dustrial and Vocational Education and a specialist's degree in Industrial and Vocational 
Education. For a description of the graduate programs, consult the Graduate Bulletin. 

Through these diversified degree programs the department serves a dual role; pro- 
viding saleable skills to students who desire a career in industry, and training teachers of in- 
dustrial subjects. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN INDUSTRIAL MECHANICS 

(Non-Teaching Degree) 

A major in Industrial Mechanics provides the student with concentrated study and 
direct experience with machines, power, materials, and industrial processes. This emphasis, 
when combined with an appropriate minor or electives, prepares the non-teaching major 
for a managerial, supervisory, or technical career in industry. 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRsT SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRST 

English 101 , 102 6 Economics 255 3 

Fine Arts (Elective) 3 English 203, 333 6 

Fundamentals of Science Fundamentals of Science 

104, 105 6 106, 107 6 

Health and Safety History 102 or 141 3 

Education 101 3 Industrial and Vocational 

History 101 or 140 3 Education 323, 324 6 

Mathematics 101 3 Mathematics 103 3 

PED, ROTC, AFROTC 2 Speech Communication 

Psychology 110 3 111 3 

Political Science 101 .3 Elective /I 

32 32 



Industrial Arts/87 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Economics 301 3 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education 301, 302, 315, 

316,331,332,333,360, 

362 27 

Management 360 3 



Elective 

Industrial and Vocational 
Education 303, 318, 350, 
361 or 364, 420 or 421, 
482 

Management 364, 456, 464, 

466 



18 



12 



33 



31 

TOTAL: 128 
Although a minor is not required, the program outlined above reflects a minor in in- 
dustrial management. The student's choice of a minor or electives should be determined by 
his or her career goals, and in consultation with the chairman of the Department of In- 
dustrial and Vocational Education. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN INDUSTRIAL MECHANICS 

All students pursuing a minor in this area must complete twenty-four (24) semester 
hours of IVE courses. Suggested courses to meet this requirement are as follows: 

IVE 301 , 302, 323, 324 or 350, 331 , 333, 360, 362 24 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

A major in Industrial Arts prepares the student to teach that phase of secondary 
education which serves to familiarize junior and senior high school students with their in- 
dustrial and technological environment. 

This program includes the University's graduation requirements and state certification 
requirements. The student automatically minors in secondary education. 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Fine Arts (Elective) 3 

Fundamentals of Science 

104,105 6 

Health and Safety 

Education 101 3 

History 101 or 140 3 

Mathematics 101 3 

PED, ROTC, or AFROTC 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Sociology 101 .3 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 

372,374 6 

English 203, 204 6 

Fundamentals of Science 

106, 107 6 

History 102 or 141 3 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education 323, 324 

or 350 6 

Political Science 101 3 

Speech Communication 111 ._$ 

33 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum and Instruction: 

Secondary 422 3 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education 116,301,302, 

331,332,333,360, 

362 24 

Research and Foundations 

400, 469 6 

Special Education 400 .J 

36 



SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Curriculum and Instruction: 

Secondary 3 10, 313,453, 

483 18 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education 315, 316, 361 

or 364, 401,480 15 



TOTAL: 



33 
134 



88/College of Education and Psychology 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

All students pursuing a minor in this area must complete thirty (30) hours in the 
following IVE courses: 



IVE 1 16, 301 , 302, 323, 324, or 350 

331, 333, 360, 362, or 361, 401 



30 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN INDUSTRIAL 

AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

A major in Industrial and Vocational Education, with an emphasis in one of the 
following areas, prepares the student to teach a previously acquired vocational or technical 
skill at the secondary or post-secondary level. A minimum of two years' work experience in 
a trade or technical area is required for state certification. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 101, 102 6 

Fine Arts (Elective) 3 

Fundamentals of Science 

104, 105 6 

Health and Safety 

Education 101 3 

History 101 or 140 3 

Mathematics 101 3 

PED, ROTC, AFROTC 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Sociology 101 ._$ 

32 



English 203, 204 6 

Fundamentals of Science 

106,107 6 

History 102 or 141 3 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education Skill Courses 12 

Political Science 101 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 



33 



Secondary Trade & Industrial Emphasis 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum and Instruction: 

Secondary 3 10, 422 6 

Educational Psychology 

372 3 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education Skill Courses 12 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education 43 1,40 1,403, 

436 12 

Research and Foundations 

400 J 

36 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum and Instruction: 

Secondary 313, 480 12 

Educational Psychology 

374 3 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education 435, 480, 481, 

482 12 

Research and Foundations 

469 3 

Special Education 400 3 



TOTAL: 



33 
134 



Post-Secondary Trade and Industrial Emphasis 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Adult Education 476 3 Educational Psychology 

Electives 6 374 3 

Industrial and Vocational Electives 6 

Education Skill Courses 12 Industrial and Vocational 



Psychology/89 



Industrial and Vocational 
Education431,401,403, 
436 



Education 435, 480, 481, 

482 12 

12 Industrial and Vocational 

Education 494 or 495 ._9 

33 30 

TOTAL: 128 



Technical Education Emphasis 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Fine Arts (Elective) 3 

Fundamentals of Science 

104,106 6 

Health and Safety 

Education 101 3 

History 101 or 140 3 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

PED, ROTC, AFROTC 2 

Sociology ,Ji 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Adult Education 476 3 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education 323, 324 or 

350 6 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education Skill Courses 12 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education 43 1,40 1,403, 

436 \2 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 203, 333 6 

History 102 or 141 3 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education Skill Courses 12 

Physics (Technical) 105, 

106 6 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 



33 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 374 3 

Electives 9 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education 435, 480, 481, 

482 12 

Industrial and Vocational 

Education 494 or 495 9 



TOTAL: 



33 
131 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

James D. Lowe, Jr., Chairman 

H. N. Anderson, Dickson, R. P. Edwards, Faulkender, Gates, Gurman, Hailey, 

Harsh, L. K. Hildman, B. Holliman, G. Jones, Koeppel, Layne, Ozerden, Presley, 

Ritzier, D. Sisemore, Sitton, Snyder, Wesley 
The Department of Psychology offers a full range of courses with emphasis areas in 
General-Applied Psychology, Pre Professional Psychology, and Teaching Psychology in 
High School. A student majoring in Psychology may work toward either a Bachelor of Arts 
or a Bachelor of Science degree. To complete the Bachelor of Arts degree, a student must 
complete nine (9) semester hours in a foreign language. 

The student wishing to major in Psychology must complete twenty-four (24) semester 
hours of coursework in the Department of Psychology, in addition to PSY 1 10. Courses in 
Educational Psychology (EPY) are taught in the Department of Psychology and may be 
counted as part of the twenty-four required hours. 



90/College of Education and Psychology 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 101, 102 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104, 105 6 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

History 101, 102 or 140, 141 6 

Physical Education Activity 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Social Science elective 3 

Speech Communication 111 Ji 

32 



English (200 level or above) 6 

Fine Arts 3 

Fundamentals of Science 106, 107 6 

Mathematics 3 

Psychology 310 3 

Social Science elective 3 

Electives 6 



30 



JUNIOR YEAR 



General-Applied Emphasis 
SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Psychology 360, 320 6 Psychology 418 3 

Psychology electives 6 Psychology electives 6 

Minor 9 Minor 9 

Electives 12 Electives 15 



33 



TOTAL: 



33 

128 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Pre-Professional Emphasis 
SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Psychology 360, 320, 422 9 Psychology 418, 426, 436 or 455 9 

Psychology elective 3 Minor 9 

Minor 9 Electives 15 

Electives 12 



33 



TOTAL: 



33 

128 



JUNIOR YEAR 



**Teaching Psychology Emphasis 
SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Educational Psychology 372, 374 6 

Psychology 360, 320, 422 9 

Research and Foundations 400 3 

Secondary Education 313 3 

Secondary Education (Methods) 3 

'Electives ._9 

33 



Psychology 418, 426, 436 or 455 9 

Research and Foundations 469 3 

Secondary Education (Student 

Teaching) 9 

'Electives 12 



TOTAL: 



33 

128 



*Thc student is advised to use electives to establish certification in an additional area— see Education adviser for 
guidance. 

••Students completing the Secondary Teacher Education Program in Psychology after September 1 , 1981 will be required 
to take the following additional courses as a part of the program: 



Hours 



Secondary Education 310 
Junior-Senior High School Reading Methods 



Special Education/91 

Secondary Education 422 

Curriculum Development for Career Education 3 

Special Education 400 

The Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child ^^3 

9 

DEPARTMENT OF RESEARCH AND FOUNDATIONS 

Paul Peddicord, Chairman 

J. Berry, Davidson, B. Davis, Ferguson, Garcia, L. Jones, Kazelskis, 

Knight, Lee, Leonard, Maddox, E. Walters 

The Department of Research and Foundations provides supportive services in teacher 

education. At the undergraduate level, these services include Educational Foundations and 

Educational Media. At the graduate level, these services include Educational Foundations, 

Educational Media, and Research Training. 

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Including Fundamentals of Science 

Bobby N. Irby, Chairman 

Bellipanni, F. Brown, I. Brown, Cotten, Dale, 

Matthews, Milkent, J. R. Moore, Sonnier, Story 

The Department of Science Education is operated jointly by the College of Science and 
Technology and the College of Education and Psychology. The facilities are in the College 
of Science and Technology. Programs in teacher education are in the College of Education 
and Psychology. Responsibility for the curriculum is shared jointly. Please check this 
department's offerings in the College of Science and Technology, page 232. 

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION 

William V. Plue, Chairman 
Gaar, Karnes, Markwalder, Norsworthy, Worthington 

The University of Southern Mississippi prepares teachers to teach in several areas of 
exceptionality. Emphasis areas are available in Educationally Handicapped (mental retar- 
dation and specific learning disabilities), Physically Handicapped, Visually Handicapped, 
and Gifted Education. 

The prospective student should understand state certification requirements are to be 
substantially changed September 1, 1981. The program described below reflects this 
change. Current majors may finish under present regulations if graduation is completed by 
the 1981 date. All majors are encouraged to seek advice about their program from faculty 
advisers. 

Students wishing to major in Special Education should follow the program outlined 
below. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 

(K - 12) 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 , 102 6 Educational Psychology 374 3 

Fine Arts, AA 100 3 English 301 , Literature 6 

Fundamentals of Science Fundamentals of Science 

131, 132 6 133, 134 6 

Health and Safety Education Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

101 3 Research and Foundation 400 3 



92/College of Education and Psychology 



History 101 and 102 or 140 

and 141 6 

Physical Education Activities 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech Communication III .J 

32 



Social Science Elective , 

Special Education 400, 402, 
200 



34 



EDUCATIONALLY HANDICAPPED K-12 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Curriculum and Instruction 

306, 309 6 

Educational Psychology 

370 or 372 3 

Research and Foundation 469 3 

Special Education 430, 440 

431, 401, 403, 432, 450, 

201 22 



Curriculum and Instruction 

422 3 

Physical Education Elective 3 

Special Education 433, 411, 

470, 451. 481, 202 25 



34 31 

TOTAL (K-12): 131 
Substitutions will be made in the above program for those students seeking certifica- 
tions in Physically Handicapped, Visually Handicapped, and/or Gifted concentrations. 



COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 
ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 



Department Major 


Emphasis 


Degree** 


ART 






ART* 


Art 

Drawing and Painting 
Graphic Communication 
Three Dimensional Design 


BA,BFA 


ART EDUCATION 


BFA 


MUSIC 






MUSIC* 


Church Music 

Jazz 

History and Literature 

Organ 

Percussion 

Piano 

Strings 

Theory-Composition 

Voice 

Wind Instruments 


BM 


MUSIC EDUCATION 


BME 




Elementary Music Education 






Instrumental Music Education 






Keyboard Music Education 






Vocal Music Education 




THEATRE ARTS 






DANCE* 




BFA 


THEATRE 


Teacher Certification 


BFA 



*Minor Available 
**Degree Abbreviations: (BA) Bachelor of Arts, (BFA) Bachelor of Fine Arts, (BM) 
Bachelor of Music, (BME) Bachelor of Music Education 



COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 

John E. Green, Dean 

The primary purpose of the College of Fine Arts is to provide its students with a well- 
rounded preparation for professional teaching careers in one of the many branches of art, 
music, dance, or theatre. In addition, it seeks to provide opportunities for students in all 
departments of the University to participate in artistic activities and develop an awareness 
of cultural values. 

To achieve its purposes, the College of Fine Arts offers courses of study centered 
around a core of theoretical, historical, and other academic subjects, and designed to 
develop artistic ability and general cultural awareness. 

ORGANIZATION 

The College of Fine Arts is organized into four departments: Allied Arts, Art, Music, 
and Theatre Arts. Baccalaureate majors are available in Art, Art Education, Music, Music 
Education, Dance, and Theatre. Undergraduate minors are available in Art, Dance, Music, 
and Theatre. An Allied Arts course, which is designed to introduce the arts in an integrated 
manner, is taught by teams of instructors drawn from each department of the College. This 
course fulfills the University's core requirements for fine arts. 

Since curricular requirements vary for each major, students desiring degrees from the 
College of Fine Arts should follow the courses outlined under each department. 

Students majoring in elementary education who wish to emphasize areas in fine arts, 
please see "Areas of Concentration for Elementary Certification." 

DEPARTMENT OF ALLIED ARTS 

Walter Lok, Chairman 

Mullican, Thomas 

The Department of Allied Arts is an arm of the College of Fine Arts designed to pro- 
vide students with an overview of the nature of the arts, generally, and to examine through 
a team of specialists, the structure of musical, plastic, and theatrical expressions. 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Jeff R. Bowman, Chairman 
DeWitt, Meade, Merrifield, Poirier, Ryan, Stanley, Ward 

Curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts are offered in art education, 
drawing and painting, graphic communication (commercial art), and three-dimensional 
design. Curricula are also available in art leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Minor 
programs are available in Art. The recommended art minor consists of nine (9) hours draw- 
ing, nine (9) hours design, and nine (9) hours of art history. 

Exhibitions on tour and students' exhibitions are arranged and presented by the facul- 
ty and student committees. The National Teachers Examinations are required of all 
students with an emphasis in Art Education. The department reserves the right to retain 
student work for exhibition purposes. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ART 

All students pursuing a major in art must complete the following requirements. 

General Core Hours 

English 101 , 102 6 

Humanities 9 

(Literature, foreign language, history, philosophy, religion: no more than six hours 

from any one area) 
Mathematics 3 



Art/95 



Physical Education or Approved Substitute 2 

Science 6 

Social Science 9 

(Nine hours from the following areas with no more than three hours from any one 

area: anthropology, economics, geography, psychology, sociology, political 

science.) 

Professional Requirements 

ART 101, 102, 111, 112, 

131, 332, 333, 334 or 335 24 

ART Electives 9 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ART, EMPHASIS ART 

(Bachelor of Arts Degree-BA) 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 101, 102, 111, 112, 131 15 

English 100 or Elective 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science ^3 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art History 332, 333 6 

Art Elective 6 

Art Sequence I 6 

Humanities Core 6 

Minor or Elective 9 

Science ^ 

36 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art History 334/335 3 

Art Sequence I, II 6 

Art Elective 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Humanities Core 3 

Minor or Elective 3 

Social Science Core ^ 

30 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art Sequence II 6 

Foreign Language 3 

Minor or Elective 15 

Social Science Core 6 



TOTAL: 



30 

128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ART, EMPHASIS ART EDUCATION 
(Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree-BFA) 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 101, 102, 111, 112 12 

English 101, 102 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104, 105 6 

History 101, 102 6 

Physical Education 2 

Speech Communication 111 3 



35 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 131,201,221,332 12 

Art Elective 6 

Art Education 309 3 

English 203 3 

Fundamentals of Science 106 3 

Health 101 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Secondary Education 310 ^ 

36 



96/College of Fine Arts 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Art 321 , 333, 334 or 335, 412 12 

Art Elective 3 

Art Education 310 3 

Educational Psychology 372 3 

English Literature 3 

Fundamentals of Science 107 3 

Mathematics 3 

Research and Foundations 300 3 

Social Science Core 3 



36 



Art 351, 414 6 

Art Education 492 3 

Educational Psychology 374 3 

Research and Foundations 469 3 

Secondary Education 313, 422, 

452,482 18 

Special Education 400 3 



TOTAL: 



36 

143 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ART, 

EMPHASIS DRAWING AND PAINTING 

(Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree-BFA) 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 101, 102, 111, 112, 131,221 18 

English 100 or Elective 3 

English 101 3 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science ^_3 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 203, 302, 323, 421 12 

Art History 334/335 3 

Art Elective 3 

Electives 6 

Humanities Core 6 

Social Science Core ^3 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 201, 202, 321, 322 12 

Art History 332, 333 6 

English 102 3 

Humanities Core 3 

Science 3 

Social Science Core ^ 

33 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 303, 422, 423, 428 12 

Art Electives 6 

Electives 12 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ART, 

EMPHASIS GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION 

(Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree-BFA) 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 101, 102, 111, 112, 131 15 

English 100 or Elective 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science ._3 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 201, 202, 311 9 

Art 341, 342, 344 9 

Art History 332, 333 6 

Elective 3 

Humanities Core 6 

Science ._3 

36 



Music/97 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 301, 343, 441 9 

Art Electives 6 

Art History 334/335 3 

Electives 6 

Humanities Core 3 

Social Science Core JJ 

30 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 442, 443, 448 9 

Art Elective 3 

Electives 12 

Social Science Core 6 



TOTAL: 



30 

128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ART, 
EMPHASIS THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN 

(Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree-BF A ) 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 101, 102, 111, 112, 131 15 

English 100 or Elective 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science ^3 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 302, 303, 45 1 , 452 12 

Art Electives 6 

Art History 334/335 3 

Electives 9 

Humanities Core 3 

Social Science Core ^ 

36 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 201, 202, 351, 352 12 

Art History 332, 333 6 

Elective 3 

Humanities Core 6 

Science 3 

30 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 453, 454, 458 9 

Art Elective 3 

Electives 12 

Social Science Core 6 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

A. Norbert Carnovale, Chairman 

Alexander, Andersen, A. Anderson, Behm, Bohl, Bullock, Cox, Cushman, 

Deans, P. Dennis, Donohue, Donovan, Edrington, Enderlin, Goldberg, 

A. Gower, W. Gower, J. E. Green, L. Green, Guilbeau, Hays, R. H. Hill, 

Hong, Imbragulio, Jerome, M. R. Johnson, R. T. Johnson, Lebsack, 

Love, McCreery, M. Moore, Moreland, J. Mullins, Osadchuk, Pound, 

R. Prenshaw, Presser, Ragsdale, Sanchez, N. Thomas, L. Thrash, Tuley, Waldoff, 

Wieman, V. Wood, Zaninelli, Zepeda 

The University of Southern Mississippi Department of Music is a fully accredited 
member of the National Association of Schools of Music. Requirements are in accordance 
with the published regulations of this Association. 

Students electing to take applied lessons not required for specific degree programs are 
required to pay an additional fee. (See Table II, Special Fees and Expenses.) 

There are two undergraduate majors available to students in the Department of Music, 
a major in Music or in Music Education. Emphasis areas in music are: Church Music, Jazz, 
Music History and Literature, Organ, Percussion, Piano, Strings (including Guitar), 



98/College of Fine Arts 

Theory-Composition, Voice, and Wind Instruments. Music Education emphasis areas are: 
Instrumental, Keyboard, Vocal, and Elementary. 

Every music or music education degree requires participation in the same major 
ensemble for the equivalent of four academic years, exclusive of the student teaching 
semester. Major performing ensembles are band, orchestra, and chorus. Jazz lab band 
satisfies the requirement only for students pursuing the BM degree with emphasis in jazz. 
For students whose degree plan requires a chorus, assignment to the proper major perform- 
ing chorus is made by the director of choral activities. The approval of the department 
chairman must be obtained for any exceptions to the major performing ensemble require- 
ment as stated above. Students who do not have the proper number of terms of registration 
for the correct major performing ensemble will not be allowed to graduate. 

Advisory Auditions and Examinations 

Every potential music major is required to perform an advisory audition and take 
placement examinations in music theory and piano prior to the first term of enrollment as a 
music major. 

Recital Attendance Requirements 

Music and Music Education students are required to register for Recital Class (APM 
199, 299, 399, or 499), attend the weekly student Recital Hour, and attend a minimum of 6 
recitals/concerts each semester. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN MUSIC 

The student who wishes to take a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree and 
minor in music may do so by taking the following distribution of courses: 
MUS101, 102, 131,201,202, 
MED 331, 332, 

APM 101, 102, 161, 162 or MED 301 
Instrumental Elective (other than keyboard) 
Music Elective 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MUSIC 

(Bachelor of Music— BM) 

Emphasis; Voice 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music piano, 161, 162, Applied Music 201, 202, 261, 

major performing ensemble, 1 99 12 262, major performing 

English 101 , 102 6 ensemble, 299 12 

Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 131,439 ... II Foreign Language 6 

Physical Education or approved Humanities electives 6 

substitute 2 Music 201 , 201 L, 202, 202L, 23 1 , 

232 \2 

31 36 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music 361, 362, 370, major Applied Music 461, 462, 470, 

performing ensemble, 399 9 major performing ensemble, 499 9 

Foreign Language 6 Mathematics 1 20 3 

Music 301, 302, 321 or 322, 440, Music Education 450, 451 4 

44 1 10 Science electives 6 

Music Education 331, 332 3 Social Science electives 6 



Social Science elective 3 Theatre 447, 448 

Theatre 341 , 342 J 

33 



Piano/99 
2 



30 
TOTAL: 130 



Emphasis: Piano 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music 101 , 102, major 

performing ensemble, 199 8 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities electives 6 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 131 8 

Physical Education or approved 

substitute 1 2 

33 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music 301 , 302, 370, 371 , 
372, 375, 376, major performing 

ensemble, 399 13 

Electives 7 

Music 301, 302, 322 6 

Music Education 33 1 , 332 3 

Social Science elective ^3 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music 201 , 202, major 

performing ensemble, 299 8 

Music 201 , 201 L, 202, 202L, 23 1 , 

232 12 

Science electives 6 

Social Science electives 6 



32 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music 401 , 402, 470, 475, 

476, major performing 

ensemble, 499 12 

Electives 10 

Music 442, 443 4 

Music Education 301 , 452, 453 6 



TOTAL: 



32 
129 



Emphasis: Organ 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music piano, 111, 112, 

major performing ensemble, 199 12 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities electives 6 

Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 131 8 

Physical Education or approved 

substitute /I 

34 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music 311,312, major 
performing ensemble, 370, 371 , 
372,399 II 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Music 301, 302, 321 or 322, 401, 

459,462 15 

Music Education 331,332 J| 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music 211,212, major 

performing ensemble, 299 8 

Foreign Language 6 

Music 201 , 201 L, 202, 202L, 23 1 , 

232 12 

Science electives 6 



32 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music 41 1,412,470, 
major performing ensemble, 

499 9 

Music 444, 445 4 

Music Education 301 , 423, 454, 

455 9 

Social Science electives ._9 

31 
TOTAL: 129 



IOO/College of Fine Arts 



Emphasis: Strings 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music piano, major instru- 
ment, 181,199 12 

English 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 120 3 

Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 131 8 

Physical Education or approved 

substitute /I 

31 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 

281,299 8 

Electives 6 

Humanities electives 6 

Music201,201L,202,202L, 

231,232 12 



32 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 

370,371,372,381,399 11 

Music 301 , 302, 321 or 322 6 

Music Education 331, 332 3 

Science electives 6 

Social Science electives 6 



32 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 

470, 47 1 , 472, 48 1 , 499 11 

Electives , 2 

Music 401 , 446, 447 7 

Music Education 221 , 222, 301 , 

322,323,456,457 10 

Social Science elective ^_3 

33 
TOTAL: 128 



Emphasis: Wind Instruments 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music piano, major 

instrument, 181 or 182, 199 12 

English 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 120 3 

Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 131 8 

Physical Education or approved 

substitute /I 

31 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 

281 or 282, 299 8 

Humanities electives 6 

Music 201, 20 1L, 202, 202L, 
231,232 12 

Music Education 221 1 

Social Science electives ^ 

33 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 

370, 371 , 372, 381 or 382, 399 11 

Elective 3 

Music 301 , 302, 321 or 322 6 

Music Education 33 1 , 332, 42 1 , 425 5 

Science electives ^ 

31 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 

470, 47 1 , 472, 48 1 or 482, 499 11 

Elective 6 

Music 401 , 446, 447 7 

Music Education 301 , 458, 459 6 

Social Science elective ,3 

33 
TOTAL: 128 



Emphasis: Percussion 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Applied Music piano, 156, 157, 

181 or 182, 199 12 

English 101, 102 6 



Applied Music 256, 257, 281 or 

282, 299 8 

Electives 6 



Jazz/ 101 



Mathematics 1 20 3 

Music 101 , 101L, 102, 102L, 131 8 

Physical Education or approved 

substitute /I 

31 



Humanities electives 6 

Music 201 , 201 L, 202, 202L, 
231,232 12 



32 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music 356, 357, 370, 37 1 , 

372,381 or 382, 399 11 

Music 301, 302, 322 6 

Music Education 33 1 , 332 3 

Science electives 6 

Social Science electives 6 



32 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music 456, 457, 470, 471 , 

472, 481 or 482, 499 11 

Electives 3 

Music 401 , 446, 447 7 

Music Education 301 , 321 , 322, 323, 

458,459 9 

Social Science elective ,3 

33 
TOTAL: 128 



Emphasis: Jazz 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 

piano, 184, 199 10 

English 101,102 6 

Humanities elective 6 

Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 131 8 

Physical Education or approved 
substitute 2 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 
384, 399 8 

Music 322, 360, 367,375,376, 

401,467,470 17 

Social Science elective 6 



31 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 

284,299.. 6 

Mathematics 120 3 

Music 201, 201 L, 202, 202L, 231, 

232 12 

Music Education 42 1 , 425 2 

Science elective 6 

Social Science elective ,3 

32 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 

minor instrument, 484, 499 12 

Electives 6 

Music 301 , 302, 475, 476 8 

Music Education 33 1 , 332, 428 4 

Music History elective ^3 

33 
TOTAL: 128 



Emphasis: Church Music 

The curriculum in Church Music is designed to provide a thorough and complete 
course of training for those who intend to pursue church music as a full-time profession. 
Special emphasis is placed on literature to be used in the church services. Students will not 
be enrolled for organ until satisfactory proficiency at the piano has been demonstrated. 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument 

(organ, piano, or voice), 

major performing ensemble, 199 6 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities electives 6 

Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 131 8 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 

minor instrument, major 

performing ensemble, 299 10 

Mathematics 120 3 

Music 201, 201 L, 202, 202L, 

231,232 12 



102/ColIege of Fine Arts 



Physical Education or approved 

substitute 2 

Science elective ^ 

34 



Religion electives 6 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 
major performing ensemble, 399 8 

Music 301, 302, 321 or 322, 351, 

459,462 15 

Music Education 3 1 1 , 3 1 2, 423 9 



32 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, 

major performing ensemble, 

470 (may be waived if student 

takes 3 additional hours in 

his applied area), 499 9 

Music 401 , 448, 449 7 

Music Education 33 1 , 332, 450 5 

Social Science electives 9 

Theatre 341 A 

31 
TOTAL: 128 



Emphasis: Music Theory— Composition 

This emphasis is designed to prepare the student for teaching theory and composition 
and writing and arranging music of serious intent. Various steps in the preparation of music 
from the preliminary sketch to the published composition are included. The student will 
become familiar with the Music-writer, Vari-Typer, diazo-printing, offset-printing, 
copyright law, and the sale, distribution, and promotion of published music. 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music piano, elective, 

major performing ensemble, 199 10 

English 101,102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 131 8 

Physical Education or approved 

substitute /I 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music elective, major 

performing ensemble, 291 , 

292,299 10 

Computer Science 100 3 

Mathematics 120 3 

Music 201, 20 1L, 202, 202L, 

231,232,321,322 H> 

32 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music elective, major 
performing ensemble, 391 , 392, 
399 12 

Music 301 , 302 4 

Music Education 321 , 322, 323, 
331,332 6 

Science electives 6 

Social Science electives 6 



34 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music elective, major 

performing ensemble, 491 , 

492,499 12 

Electives 4 

Music 401 3 

Music History-Literature 

electives 6 

Music Theory elective 2 

Social Science elective JJ 

30 
TOTAL: 128 



Emphasis: Music History and Literature 

The curriculum in Music History and Literature is planned for those who intend 
ultimately to teach musicology on the college level, or for those who desire careers in music 
librarianship, music journalism, music publishing, or the recording industry— fields in 
which a wide and comprehensive knowledge of music history and literature is essential. 



Music Education/ 103 

The student in music history and literature will receive a strong foundation not only in 
his chosen field but also in theory and in academic subjects which will enrich the student's 
cultural background. 

Participation in Collegium Musicum is required for music history and literature ma- 
jors. Any exception must be cleared by the chairman of the Music Department. 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRsT SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music piano, major Applied Music major instrument, 

instrument, major performing major performing ensemble, 299 6 

ensemble, 199 10 Foreign Language 6 

English 101 , 102 6 History 101 , 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 Music 201 , 201 L, 202, 202L, 231 , 

Mathematics 120 3 232 12 

Music 101, 101 L, 102, 102L, 131 8 Social Science electives 6 

Physical Education or approved 

substitute /I 

35 36 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music major instrument, Applied Music major instrument, 

major performing ensemble, major performing ensemble, 

385, 391 , 399 12 485, 499 10 

Music 301 , 302, 321 , 322 8 Music 401 3 

Music Education 331, 332 3 Music History-Literature electives* 12 

Music History-Literature electives* 6 Science elective 3 

Science elective ^_3 Social Science elective ^3 

32 31 

•Music History-Literature electives to be selected from the following courses: 
Music 352, 432, 433, 434, 435, 436, 437, 450, 45 1 , 462 

TOTAL: 134 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MUSIC EDUCATION 
(Bachelor of Music Education— BME) 

The curricula in music education are designed to prepare musicians who will teach in 
the public or private schools, or teach privately. The emphases listed below are designed to 
provide a balance between music performance, music pedagogy, and general education. 
These curricula are fully certified by the National Association of Schools of Music, and 
they satisfy teacher certification requirements. 

Certain forms and one major examination are required for completion of all degrees in 
Music Education. A timetable for the student's completion of these forms is given below. 

1 . At the beginning of the junior year, the Program Plan-Teaching Form is to be com- 
pleted (see Teacher Education Program for specific instructions). 

2. Six months in advance of the student teaching semester, the Application for Stu- 
dent Teaching is due (see Teacher Education Program for specific instructions). 
Students should contact the Music Education supervisor of student teachers at the 
beginning of their junior year regarding practice teaching assignments. 

3. At least two semesters before degree requirements are completed, the Application 
for Degree must be filed (see Teacher Education Program for specific instructions). 

4. During the senior year the National Teacher Examinations (NTE) should be taken. 
Guidelines for completing the above-mentioned forms and examinations may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies. 



104/College of Fine Arts 



Emphasis: Instrumental Music Education 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Applied Music Major Instrument, 

Ensemble, 199 4 

English 101, 102 6 

Health Education 101 3 

History 101, 102 or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 3 

Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 131 8 

Music Education 101 , 102 4 

Physical Education or substitute /I 

36 



Applied Music Major Instrument, 

Ensemble 299 6 

English 203, 204 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104, 105 6 

Music 201 , 201 L, 202, 202L, 23 1 , 

232 12 

Music Education 221 *, 222* 2 

Psychology 1 10 3 

Speech Communication 111 ^3 

38 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music Major Instrument, 

Ensemble, 399 6 

Educational Psychology 372, 374 6 

Fundamentals of Science 106, 107 6 

Music 301, 302 4 

Music Education 311,312,331, 

332, 301, 421*, 422* 13 

Political Science 101 3 



38 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music Major Instrument, 

Ensemble, 499 3 

Curriculum Instruction Elementary 

309 3 

Curriculum Instruction Secondary 

313,422,493 15 

Music 401 3 

Music Education 412, 425*, 426*, 

427*, 428* 7 

Special Education 400 jj 

34 
TOTAL: 146 



•In each area, one hour of applied study on an appropriate instrument may be substituted for class instruction. 



Emphasis: Keyboard Music Education 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music Ensemble, 101, 102, 

161,199 8 

English 101, 102 6 

Health Education 101 3 

History 101, 102 or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 3 

Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 131 8 

Music Education 301 2 

Physical Education or substitute .!_ 

38 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music Ensemble, 301 , 302, 
399 6 

Education Psychology 370 or 372, 
374 6 

Fundamentals of Science 106, 107 6 

Music 301 , 302 4 

Music Education 31 1, 312, 331, 
332 9 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Theatre Arts 341 A 

35 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music Ensemble, 201 , 202, 

162,299 8 

English 203, 204 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104, 105 6 

Music 201 , 201 L, 202, 202L, 23 1 , 

232 12 

Music Education 450 2 

Psychology 110 3 

37 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music Ensemble, 401 , 499 3 

Curriculum Instruction Elementary 

309 3 

Curriculum Instruction Secondary 

313,422,492 15 

Music Education 321 , 322, 323 

(select two), 41 1,452 7 

Political Science 101 3 

Special Education 400 3 



TOTAL: 



34 

144 



Theatre/ 105 



Emphasis: Vocal Music Education 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music Ensemble, 101 , 102, 

161,162,199 10 

English 101, 102 6 

Health Education 101 3 

History 101 , 102 or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 3 

Music 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 131 8 

Physical Education or substitute /I 

38 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music Ensemble, 201 , 202, 

261,262,299 10 

English 203, 204 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104, 105 6 

Music 201 , 201 L, 202, 202L, 23 1 , 

232 12 

Psychology 110 3 



37 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music Ensemble, 361 , 362, 

399 6 

Education Psychology 372, 374 6 

Fundamentals of Science 106, 107 6 

Music 301 , 302 4 

Music Education 31 1, 312, 331, 

332 9 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Theatre Arts 341 , 342 .JL 

36 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Applied Music Ensemble, 461 , 499 3 

Curriculum Instruction Elementary 

309 3 

Curriculum Instruction Secondary 

313,422,493 15 

Music Education 321 , 322, 323 

(select two), 41 1 , 450 7 

Political Science 101 3 

Special Education 400 JJ 

34 
TOTAL: 144 



Emphasis: Elementary Music Education 

Students wishing to become Elementary School Music Specialists should follow the 
curriculum for Instrumental, Keyboard, or Vocal Emphasis with the following exception: 
MED 440 should replace MED 411 or 41 2 and Music 456 should be added. 



DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE ARTS 

I. Blaine Quarnstrom, Chairman 
Amacker, Atherton, G. Crook, Faust, R. B. Hill, Mullican, Robertson 

The Department of Theatre Arts offers degree programs in theatre and dance. Both 
programs lead to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. 

The dance program is the only one in Mississippi offered in a college of fine arts and 
the only dance major offered in the state. The theatre program is also the only one in the 
state offered in a fine arts college. Both programs provide the student with sound theory 
and intensive practical training and, in addition, opportunities for extensive performance 
experiences and exposure to visiting professional artists. 

For information concerning Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts degrees consult 
the Graduate Bulletin. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN THEATRE 

Students seeking the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Theatre must complete the 
following: 



106/College of Fine Arts 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 120 3 

Physical Education* 2 

Social Science Core Electives 6 

Theatre 103, 111, 120, 125, 

330,331 U 

30 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Social Science Core Elective 3 

Theatre 306, 320, 330, 331 8 

Theatre Electives 12 

Free Electives H) 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Humanities Core Electives 6 

Science Core Electives 6 

Theatre 140, 200, 201, 204 

330,331 12 

Theatre Electives** 5 

Free Elective .3 

32 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Theatre 330, 331, 412, 427, 

428 11 

Theatre Electives 16 

Free Electives ^8 

35 
TOTAL: 130 



*Each of the following theatre courses may be substituted for one hour of the General Core Physical Education require- 
ment: THE 105, 106, 150, 250. 

"Theatre electives should be chosen from the following groups. Select a minimum of three courses from each of the four 
groups. 

A. Theatre 140, 310,411,417,492 

B. Theatre 150/250, 240, 353, 361, 468 

C. Theatre 301, 420, 459, 492 
D Theatre 40 1, 460, 46 1,492 

E. Theatre410,435,445,492 

F. Theatre414,415,480,492 

G. English 417, 454, 455, 472, Theatre 41 6 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN THEATRE 

Students pursuing a minor in Theatre should complete the following twenty-one (21) 
semester hours of theatre courses: 

THE 103, 120, 200, 320, plus nine (9) hours of theatre electives. 



Requirements for an Emphasis in Teacher Certification 

The theatre major desiring Teacher Certification must complete the following: 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Allied Arts 100 3 

English 101 , 102, 203 9 

Fundamentals of Science 104, 

105 6 

Physical Education 2 

Social Science Core Elective 3 

Theatre 103, 111, 120, 125, 

140,330,331 15 



38 



English 350, 370 6 

Fundamentals of Science 106, 

107 6 

History 101 and 102 or 140 and 

141 6 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Research and Foundations 300 3 

Theatre200,201,204, 330, 

331 ]0 

37 



Dance/ 107 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Educational Psychology 372, 

374 6 

English 401 , 454 or 455 6 

Health 101 3 

Speech Communication 1 1 1 3 

Research and Foundations 416 3 

Secondary Education 310 3 

Theatre306,320,330,331, 

427, 428 14 



38 



English 417, 472 6 

Research and Foundations 469 3 

Secondary Education 313, 454, 

484 15 

Speech or Theatre Electives 4 

Theatre412 3 



TOTAL: 



31 
134 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN DANCE 

Students seeking the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Dance must complete the follow 



ing: 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities Core Electives 6 

Social Science Core Elective 3 

Theatre 111 3 

Theatre 152 6 

Theatre 252 6 



30 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 221 ..- 3 

Biology Laboratory 221 1 

Social Science Core Elective 3 

Theatre 253, 354, 359, 412, 

440,462,463 18 

Theatre 358 6 

Theatre Electives (Dance) A 

35 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 220 3 

Biology Laboratory 220 1 

Mathematics 120 3 

Music 365 3 

Social Science Core Elective 3 

Theatre 120, 259, 354 7 

Theatre 258 6 

Theatre 352 J> 

32 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Physical Education 301 3 

Theatre 354, 401, 464, 465, 

466,467,470 21 

Theatre 458 6 

Theatre Electives (Dance) 4 



TOTAL: 



34 
31 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN DANCE 

Students pursuing a minor in Dance should complete the following twenty-six (26) 
semester hours of courses: 

THE 252, 253, 259, 463, 464, plus six (6) hours of Modern Dance Technique (major 
level), and six (6) hours of major level dance electives. 



SCHOOL OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
AND RECREATION 
ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 

Department Major Emphasis Degree 4 

ATHLETIC ADMINISTRATION AND COACHING 

ATHLETIC ADMINISTRATION AND COACHING* BS 
Teaching and Coaching 
Non-Teaching 

HEALTH AND SAFETY EDUCATION 

HEALTH EDUCATION* BS 

Community Health Education 
School Health Education 
School Health and Safety Education 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION* BS 

Professional Physical Education 
Teacher Certification 

RECREATION 

RECREATION* BS 

Community and Municipal Recreation 

Recreation Planning and Resource 
Management 

Therapeutic Recreation, Non- 
Certification 

Leisure Studies 



♦Minor Available 
** Degree Abbreviation: (BS) Bachelor of Science 






SCHOOL OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
AND RECREATION 

Walter E. Cooper, Dean 

PURPOSE 

The primary purpose of the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation is 
to educate future leaders in the fields of athletic administration and coaching, health, 
physical education, and recreation. Also of equal importance is the coordination of the 
physical education activity course program which includes all intramural activities, ex- 
tramural sports clubs, and the recreational equipment loan service. 

ORGANIZATION 

The Dean's Office in the School is the major administrative component. This office in- 
cludes the Dean, Graduate Coordinator, and an undergraduate coordinator-assistant. 
There are five departments: Athletic Administration and Coaching, Health and Safety 
Education, Physical Education, Recreation, and Intramural Recreational Sports. 

Each department has a chairman and the various programs and/or projects within 
departments have coordinators or directors. These departments offer the Bachelor of 
Science degree in the respective majors and coordinate teaching certification through the 
College of Education and Psychology. Career non-teaching programs are also available 
within each department. 

Consult the Graduate Bulletin for graduate program information. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Any student who satisfies admission requirements to the University through the Office 
of Admissions is eligible for admission to the School of Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation. Admission to the School, however, does not constitute admission to a major 
program. Major program admission is completed when a completed program plan is on file 
in the Dean's Office, School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. 

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN 

SCHOOL OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 

The following School of HPER Core satisfies the requirements of the University 
General Core Curriculum and is required of all students majoring within the School who 
seek teacher certification. 

Hours 

Curriculum and Instruction— Secondary 422 3 

English 101 , 102 and two other English courses 

200 level or above 12 

History 101 and 102, or 140 and 141 6 

Health and Safety Education 101,311 6 

Humanities and Fine Arts 3 

Elect one course from the following for 3 hours: 

art, music, drama, dance, or theatre 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education (activity)* 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Science 12 

Biological Science— 6 hours 

Physical Science -6 hours 

(The Fundamentals of Science series satisfies this 

requirement) 



1 10/School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

Special Education 400 3 

Social Sciences 6 

Elect two courses from the following for 6 hours: 

anthropology, economics, geography, political 

science, and sociology 

63 

*The physical education activity requirement may be satisfied by successfully completing the following options: 
ROTC/AFROTCI, varsity athletics, Marching Band, Dixie Darlings, cheerleaders, or Pom-Pon Girls. 

Students in a non-teaching curriculum will continue to use the General Core Cur- 
riculum. 

Departments also have additional specific course requirements which must be com- 
pleted. In order to qualify for a degree within the School of Health, Pysical Education, and 
Recreation, students must complete all requirements in the program of their choice as 
specified in this catalog and outlined in their approved program plan. 

Teaching Certification 

Students desiring teaching certification must also file a program plan with the College 
of Education and Psychology. 

Academic Suspensions 

Students must maintain the academic standards, as stipulated in the Academic Re- 
quirements section of this Bulletin, to assure readmission quarterly. Academic suspension 
requires the dean's approval prior to readmission. 

Waiver of Substitution of Major Requirements 

Any waiver of substitution of major requirements must be approved by the ap- 
propriate department chairman and the Dean of the School. 



DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETIC ADMINISTRATION 
AND COACHING 

M. C. Johnson, Chairman 
M. Bell, J. R. Carpenter, Gallaspy, Giles, R. Grantham, 
E. L. Harrington, James, Ladner, Reiselt, C. J. Taylor 

The Department of Athletic Administration and Coaching offers a major in Athletic 
Administration and Coaching leading to the Bachelor of Science degree; a minor program; 
and specialization programs in aquatics, athletic training, minor sports, and officiating 
competitive athletics. 

The objectives of the Department of Athletic Administration and Coaching are as 
follows: 

1 . To prepare athletic administrators and coaches for careers in the total educational 
environment. 

2. To prepare students majoring in athletic administration and coaching for non L 
teaching careers. 

3. To provide a minor in athletic administration and coaching for students majoring 
in other academic disciplines. 

4. To provide each student the opportunity to specialize for certification in the areas 
of aquatics, athletic training, minor sports, and officiating competitive sports. 

PROFESSIONAL DECREE (TEACHING AND COACHING) 

The purpose of this program is to provide professional training for teachers who will 
administer and coach athletics in addition to their teaching responsibilities. The program 



Teaching and Coaching/ 1 1 1 

requires a total of thirty (30) semester hours in athletic administration and coaching. 
Students must also complete their professional requirements for secondary education and 
the general education requirements for secondary teachers. Teaching certification will be in 
the area selected by each student in conference with his adviser. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN 

ATHLETIC ADMINISTRATION AND COACHING 

WITH AN EMPHASIS IN TEACHING AND COACHING 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Health and Safety Education 3 

History 101 and 102, or 140 and 141 .6 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education (activity)* 1 

Science 6 

Biological Science-3 hours 
Physical Science-3 hours 
(The Fundaments of Science series 
satisfies this requirement) 

Social Sciences 6 

Elect two courses from the 
following for 6 hours (not more 
than 3 hours from any area): 
anthropology, economics, geography, 
political science, and sociology. 



31 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Athletic Administration and 

Coaching (AAC) 303 3 

AAC Elective 3 

English (200 Level or above) 6 

Health and Safety Education 311 3 

Humanities and Fine Arts 3 

Elect one course from the following 
for 3 hours: literature, fine arts,** 
religion, foreign language, phi- 
losophy. 

Physical Education (activity)* 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Science 6 

Biological Science-3 hours 
Physical Science-3 hours 
(The Fundamentals of Science series 
satisfies this requirement) 

Speech Communication 111 ^3 

32 



* The physical education activity requirement may be satisfied by successfully completing the following option: 
ROTC AFROTC, varsity athletics. Marching Band, Dixie Darlings, cheerleaders, or Pom-Pon Girls. 
** Students seeking teaching certification are required to take this elective in the fine arts area. 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Athletic Administration and 

Coaching (AAC) 370 3 

AAC 409 3 

AAC Electives 9 

Educational Psychology 372 3 

Educational Psychology 374 3 



Research and Foundations 400 3 

Research and Foundations 469 .J 

27 



AAC 6 

(Elect from: AAC 300, 420, 470, 471) 

AAC Elective 3 

Curriculum and Instruction 3 

(Secondary: Special Methods) 
Curriculum and Instruction — Secondary 

313 3 

Curriculum and Instruction 9 

(Secondary: Student Teaching 

24 

Students should consult with their adviser for teaching certification requirements. 
Four (4) hours taken from the following courses may be used to satisfy partially the 
thirty (30) semester hour athletic administration and coaching requirements for the profes- 
sional (teaching and coaching) degree. 
AAC210,211, 212, 213, 214,215. 

Students graduating after September 1 , 1 98 1 , will be required to take the following ad- 
ditional courses: 

Hours 

Curriculum and Instruction— Secondary 310 3 

Special Education 400 3 

Curriculum and Instruction— Secondary 422 3 



1 12/SchooI of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREE (Non-Teaching) 

The purpose of this program is to provide professional training for students desiring 
careers in non-teaching areas. Those students pursuing the Non-Teaching Emphasis shall 
not be required to take the professional teacher education requirements. These additional 
hours should be used further to enhance competencies in the students' chosen careers. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN 

ATHLETIC ADMINISTRATION AND COACHING 

WITH A NON-TEACHING EMPHASIS 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Physical Education (activity)* 2 

Science** 6 

Social Science** 3 

Nine hours from the following 
areas with no more than three 
hours from any one area: anthro- 
pology, economics, geography, 
psychology, sociology, poli- 
tical science. 
Electives 15 



32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Humanities and Fine Arts 6 

Six hours from the following areas: 
literature, allied arts, foreign 
language, history, philosophy, 
religion. 

Mathematics 3 

Social Science** 6 

Nine hours from the following areas 
with no more than three hours from 
any one area: anthropology, 
economics, geography, psychology, 
sociology, political science. 

Electives 20 



35 



* Students are required to take two physical education activity courses during the freshman year unless excused from the 
requirement by the University physician or the dean of his/her school or college. Students who complete Military Science I 
or Aerospace Studies are excused from the physical education requirement. Those participating in varsity athletics, Mar- 
ching Band, Dixie Darlings, cheerleaders, or Pom-Pon Girls may substitute this for required physical education. Only one 
physical education activity course may be taken in any one semester. 

**For recommendations and requirements in these areas, the student should consult the introduction to the appropriate 
degree-granting college or school. Note also that each college or school has additional requirements for its specific core. In 
addition each degree-granting college or school has its own requirements for a particular degree. These requirements are 
designed to give the student the necessary preparation for completing a major and are listed in the Colleges and Schools 
Section. 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Athletic Administration and 

Coaching (AAC) 240 3 

AAC 300 3 

AAC 303 3 

AAC 322 or 323 2 

AAC 340 2 

AAC 341 2 

AAC 360 3 

AAC 361 3 

AAC 362 2 

AAC Electives 8 



AAC 370 3 

AAC 409 3 

AAC 420 3 

AAC 424 3 

AAC 425 3 

AAC 460 2 

AAC 470 3 

AAC 471 3 

AAC Electives 7 



31 30 

Four (4) hours taken from the following courses may be used to satisfy partially the 
athletic administration and coaching requirement for the professional (non-teaching) em- 
phasis. 

AAC 210, 21 1,212, 213, 214, 215. 

Students desiring certification in Athletic Training may substitute National Athletic 
Trainers Association (NATA) course requirements for other Athletic Administration and 
Coaching Specialization Areas. 



Administration and Coaching/ 1 13 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR 

The purpose of this program is to provide professional training for those students ma- 
joring in other academic disciplines. The program requires a total of eighteen (18) semester 
hours in athletic administration and coaching. 

Recommended Courses: AAC 303, 471 , 409; elect three (3) hours from AAC 300, 370, 
420, or 470. 

Select from athletic administration and coaching courses to complete eighteen (18) 
hours. 



SPECIALIZATION AREAS 

In addition to the professional program (teaching and coaching), the professional pro- 
gram (non-teaching), and the minor program offered by the Department of Athletic Ad- 
ministration and Coaching, specialization areas are available to each student enrolled in the 
University. The areas of specialization are as follows: 

Aquatics 

The purpose of this program is to prepare students to meet American National Red 
Cross Water Safety Certification Requirements and the requirements as prescribed by the 
University of Southern Mississippi for certification in aquatic administration. 

1 . The Life Saving Rescue and Water Safety Certificate. Required course: AAC 362. 

2. The Water Safety Instructors (WSI) Certificate. Required courses: AAC 362 
(Prerequisite) and 460. 

3. The Aquatic Administration Certificate. Required courses: AAC 360, 361, 362, and 
460. 

Athletic Training 

The purpose of this program is to prepare students to meet certification requirements 
of the National Athletic Trainer Association. 

Required courses: AAC 370, 371, 373, 409, 472, and 476; FN 360; HSE 101, 311, and 
315; PED 301 and 402; PSY 1 10, and 800 clock hours of athletic training over a two-year 
period. 

Minor Sports 

The purpose of this program is to provide professional training for coaching in minor 
sports. 

Required courses: AAC 340, 341 , and 424; elect two (2) hours from AAC 322 or 323. 

Officiating 

The purpose of this program is to provide professional training in officiating com- 
petitive athletics. Required courses: AAC 240, 420, and 425. 



ACTIVITY COURSES 

The following courses may be taken to satisfy the University core physical education 
activity requirement. 

AAC 210, 21 1 , 212, 213, 214, 215, 362, and 460. 



1 14/SchooI of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND 
SAFETY EDUCATION 

S. Eugene Barnes, Chairman 
M. Brown, Carlson, W. L. Carr 
Switzer, Webb, Yarrow 
The Department of Health and Safety Education offers a major in Health Education. 
Health Education is an applied science which seeks to bridge the gap between the fin- 
dings of health-related research and the application of the findings to the daily lives of 
those who engage its services. Its functions are based on scientific principles and its pro- 
cesses employ intellectual, psychological, and social dimensions as it attempts to increase 
the abilities of people to make informed decisions about matters which affect personal, 
family, and community well-being. 

The department offers the following emphasis areas within the Health Education ma- 
jor. 

Requirements for an Emphasis in Community Health Education 

This program of studies is designed to prepare students for professional careers in 
health education positions in volunteer health agencies, special categorical health education 
programs, private agencies and industries, public health departments, and other govern- 
mental agencies and programs. The program requires study in foundations of health 
science, health education content areas, community organizations and groups, educational 
theory and methodology, and communications. 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 Anthropology 212 3 

Biology 101 4 Art 207 3 

English 101 , 102 6 Biology 220, 221 8 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 Food and Nutrition 360 2 

Journalism 102 3 Health and Safety Education 

Mathematics 101 3 210, 31 1 , 321 9 

Microbiology 101 4 Philosophy 253 3 

Physical Education 2 Physical Education 1 

Psychology 110 3 Sociology 310 or 31 1 3 

Speech Communication 111 ._3 

34 32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



English 300, 333 6 Adult Education 476 3 

Environmental Science 301 3 Health and Safety Education 

Genetics 101 3 409,411,412,415,421, 

Health and Safety Education 315, 423, 492 21 

341 ,414, 420, 422, 430, 435 21 Physical Education 402 3 

Management 360 3 Research and Foundations 416 3 

Sociology 46 1 .3 

36 33 

TOTAL: 135 

Requirements for an Emphasis in School Health Education 

Teacher certification regulations in Mississippi, unlike those in most other states, do 
not provide for separate certification in health education. Mississippi's regulations require 
dual certification in health and physical education with a major block of course work in 
physical education and nine (9) semester hours in health education. It is the philosophy of 
the department that nine (9) hours of professional course work cannot provide one with the 



Physical Education/1 15 

competencies required to be an effective teacher. Therefore, an emphasis in school health 
education has been provided for students who wish to prepare more adequately than is re- 
quired by certification standards to teach health education. Students who wish to pursue 
this emphasis as they prepare to become certified as health and physical education teachers 
may seek advisement in the Department of Health and Safety Education. It should be noted 
that the program plan for this emphasis will include semester hours of course work in excess 
of the minimum required for graduation. Students who wish to prepare to become school 
health educators in states where there is certification for health education can have 
developed for them a program plan with approximately forty five (45) semester hours of 
health education course work . ' 

Requirements for Teacher Certification in Safety and Driver Education 

This concentration of course work is designed for students who wish to complete the 
teacher certification requirements to teach driver education in Mississippi schools. Students 
who wish to pursue the certification are reminded that the twelve semester hours required 
for certification must be taken in addition to the course work required for the Standard 
Class A certificate in secondary education. 

HSE 341 , 420, 443, and one of the following courses: 

AAC 370, CJ 200, 305, HSE 3 1 1 , 441 , 442, and 444 

Requirements for American National Red Cross Certificates 

The department offers the following certificates for the Red Cross: 

First Aid 

A student who successfully completes HSE 310 (First Aid) will receive the American 
National Red Cross certificates for: 

a. Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 

b. Standard Multi-Media First Aid 

c. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (Optional-students who wish to receive this cer- 
tificate must complete extra class assignments.) 

First Aid Instructor 

A student who successfully completes HSE 311 (Emergency Health Care) will receive 
American National Red Cross certificates for: 

a. Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care 

b. Standard Multi-Media First Aid 

c. Instructor in Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 
(Note: The following three certificates are optional and 

will be awarded to students who successfully complete certain 
specific extra-class assignments.) 

d. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 

e. Instructor in Standard Multi-Media First Aid 

f . Instructor in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

J. William Larson, Chairman 

K. Bell, Buschner, Cooper, Cracraft, 

D. Cundiff, L. Cundiff, Marciani, 

J. Puckett, Slay, Townley 

The Department of Physical Education administers three educational programs 
designed to meet the following objectives: 

1 . To prepare physical educators for careers of their choice other than teaching. 



1 16/SchooI of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

2. To prepare physical educators for teaching careers as elementary specialists, secon- 
dary specialists, or as corrective therapists. 

3. To provide opportunities for the entire University community to develop skills for 
leisure time usage. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
WITHOUT TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

This program is designed to train physical educators for careers which do not require 
state teacher certification. Career opportunities include: industrial health fitness directors, 
YMCA, YWCA, health spas, municipal recreation, etc. 

Electives should be chosen with the aid of your adviser to insure concentrations of ex- 
perience based upon your educational objectives and degree requirements. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 101, 102 6 

Humanities and Fine Arts 
(choose from the following 
areas: allied arts, foreign 
languages, history, litera- 
ture, philosophy, and 
religion) 6 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education (activity) 2 

Science 6 

Social Science (9 hours from 
the following areas with 
no more than 3 hours from 
any one area: anthropology, 
economics, geography, 
political science, psy- 
chology, and sociology 6 

Speech Communication 111 ._$ 

32 



Physical Education 100, 146, 

147,220,303,320 

Social Science 

Electives 



33 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Health and Safety Education 

315 3 

Physical Education 301, 

323,401,402 12 

Electives 18 

33 



SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Physical Education 420 1-6 

Electives 24-29 



TOTAL: 



30 
28 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

This program is designed to train physical educators for public and private schools. In 
addition to meeting K-12 certification requirements in Mississippi, it is approved by 
NCATE. 

With the aid of your adviser, additional in-depth emphases, such as physical education 
for the elementary, secondary, or handicapped may be added. Additional certification 
areas such as driver education, first aid, athletic training, and aquatics are available. 



Corrective Therapy/ 1 17 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum and Instruction — Secondary 

422 3 

English 101, 102 6 

History 101 and 102 or 

140 and 141 6 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education (activity) 2 

Science (biological science) 6 

Social Science (elect 3 hours 

from two of the following 

areas: anthropology, 

economics, geography, 

political science, and 

sociology J3 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum and Instruction— Secondary 

310 3 

English (2 courses 200 

level or above) 6 

Health and Safety Education 

101,311 6 

Humanities and Fine Arts 

(choose from art, dance, 

music, or theatre) 3 

Physical Education (activity) 1 

Physical Science 6 

Psychology 110 3 

Special Education 400 3 

Speech Communication 111 .3 

34 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Educational Psychology 

372,374 6 

Health and Safety Education 

315,414,430 9 

Physical Education 100, 146, 

147,284,301,303,320, 

323 18 

Research and Foundations 300 .3 

36 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum and Instruction— Secondary 
313,462,491 15 

Health and Safety Education 
410. 3 

Physical Education 310, 314, 

326, 401, 402, 420 14 

Research and Foundation 469 3 



TOTAL: 



35 
137 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
WITH CORRECTIVE THERAPY CERTIFICATION 

This program is one of only 10 accredited corrective therapy programs in the nation. 
Career opportunities include: V.A. Centers, convalescent homes, athletic trainers, private 
practice in conjunction with a physician, etc. 

Individuals desiring a major with Corrective Therapy Certification may choose bet- 
ween the non-teacher certification and the teacher certification programs listed above, with 
the following changes: 

Non-Teacher Certification Plan 

Deletions : 1 ) Health and Safety Education 3 1 5 

Substitutions: 1 ) Science must be Biology 220 and 22 1 

2) Social Science- 3 hours must be Psychology 1 10 
Additions: 1) Health and Safety Education 3 hour elective in health problems 

2) Physical Education 220, 410, 41 1 

3) Psychology 426, 436 

4) Therapy 41 1 , 421 , 454, 461 , 462, 463, 464, 47 1 , 472, 473, 474 
With Teaching Certification Plan 

Deletions: 1 ) Health and Safety Education 3 1 5 

Substitutions: 1 ) Biological Science must be Biology 220 and 22 1 

Additions: 1) Physical Education 220, 410, 41 1 

2) Psychology 426, 436 

3) Therapy 41 1 , 421 , 454, 461 , 462, 463, 464, 471 , 472, 473, 474 
After completing all course work on the University campus, the student will spend two 

semesters at the V.A. Centers in Biloxi and Gulfport, Mississippi, completing the ap- 
plicable therapy courses. While there, room, meals, and uniforms will be provided. 



1 18/School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

With successful completion of the National Corrective Therapy Association Examina- 
tion, the student will be certified as a Corrective Therapist. 

THE UNIVERSITY PHYSICAL EDUCATION SERVICE PROGRAM 

This program is designed to contribute to the general education of all students. In the 
100-level activity courses students learn the basic skills of life-time sports and fitness which 
may be applied in the intramural program or during other times of leisure. The upper level 
service courses are designed to provide in-depth skill development in a particular area of in- 
terest. 

Courses which may be substituted for the two (2) course physical education core re- 
quirements are Athletic Administration and Coaching 210, 21 1 , 213, 214, 215, 362, or 460; 
Recreation 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, or 186; Theatre 105, 106, 150, 250. 



DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION 

L. Charles Burchell, Chairman 
L. Brown, Bumgardner, Rindfleisch, Wilkes 

The Department of Recreation offers programs in four areas of specialization. All pro- 
grams require the completion of a series of department or inter-departmental courses and 
lead to a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Recreation and concentration in the 
particular specialization. 

Requirements for an Emphasis in Community and Municipal Recreation 

This program provides a curriculum for students interested in career work as ad- 
ministrators, supervisors, or leaders with city and county recreation departments and 
youth-service organizations. 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Biology/Science 3 Allied Arts 100 3 

English 101 , 102 6 Biology/Science 3 

Health & Safety Education 101 3 English 300 3 

History or Philosophy 3 Health & Safety Education 311 3 

Mathematics 3 Speech Communication 111 3 

Recommended Elective 3 Recommended Elective 3 

Recreation 200, 203 Recreation 2 1 0, 2 1 1 , 322, 323 , 

2 activities 8 2 activities 10 

Social Science ^3 Sociology .3 

32 31 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Accounting 201 3 Business Education 460 3 

English 333 3 Recommended Electives 12 

Management 360 3 Recreation 424, 434, 443, 

Political Science 310 3 1 activity 10 

Recommended Elective 3 Social Science 3 

Recreation 2 1 2, 402, 4 13, 4 15, Sociology 444 3 

422, 426, 2 activities \6 _ 

31 31 
REC 403 Field Work (9 hrs. to be taken in the summer between the junior and senior 
years) 



Recreation/ 1 19 

Requirements for an Emphasis in 

Recreation Planning and Resource Management 

This program provides a curriculum with concentration in the outdoor recreation plan- 
ning and management aspects of parks and recreation. It has been designed for students 
who desire career recreation planning and/or management specialities. Such specialists 
work as park and recreation planners, park managers, park rangers, camp directors, and 
interpreters. Within this emphasis area there are three options; outdoor recreation, plan- 
ning and management. Each option has separate requirements of twelve to fourteen hours 
from inter-departmental offerings. 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Health & Safety Education 101 3 

History or Philosophy 3 

Mathematics 3 

Recommended Elective 3 

Recreation 200, 203, 

2 activities 8 

Science/Biology 3 

Social Sciences ._$ 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 

Biology/Science 3 

English 300 3 

Health & Safety Education 311 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Recommended Elective 3 

Recreation 210, 21 1,322, 323, 

2 activities 10 

Social Science *3 

31 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 333 3 

Option Area Courses 9 

Recommended Electives 6 

Recreation 212, 402, 413, 447 

2 activities 10 

Social Science .3 

31 



Option Area Course 3 

Recommended Electives 12 

Recreation 415, 417, 434, 436, 
441 , 1 activity 16 



31 

REC 403 Field Work (9 hrs. to be taken in the summer between the junior and senior 
years) 

Requirements for an Emphasis in Therapeutic Recreation 

This program provides a curriculum for students interested in working as recreational 
therapists in hospitals, mental and corrective institutions, rehabilitative centers, retirement 
villages, or in special education centers. 






FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology/Science 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Health <& Safety Education 101 3 

History or Philosophy 3 

Mathematics 3 

Recommended Elective 3 

Recreation 200, 203, 

2 activities 8 

Social Science .J 

21 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 

Biology/Science 3 

English 300 3 

Health & Safety Education 31 1 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Recommended Electives 4 

Recreation 210, 322, 323,341 

1 activity 12 



31 



JUNIOR YEAR 


SEM. HRS. 


SENIOR YEAR 


SEM. HRS. 


English 333 

Social Science 


3 

6 


Physical Education 401 , 404 . 
Special Education 425, 428 . . 


6 

6 



120/SchooI of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

Special Education 400, 440 6 Recommended Electives 10 

Recreation 21 1 , 350, 402, 410, Recreation 212, 451, 452, 

411,413,2 activities |6 2 activities 9 

31 3l 

REC 403 Field Work (9 hrs. to be taken summer term following the senior year) 
An Emphasis in Therapeutic Recreation with Teaching Certification which would pro- 
vide a curriculum for students who desire teacher education and special education is 
available through special request and adviser counseling. These students will be prepared 
for teaching assignments in special education in public schools as well as therapeutic recrea- 
tion in hospitals and insititutions. 

Requirements for an Emphasis in Leisure Studies 

This option is designed for students who wish to pursue a general recreation education 
with emphasis in the areas of contemporary leisure values and philosophies. Students in this 
program may not be required to complete the recreational fieldwork requirement, REC 
403, but may option additional course work. 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology/Science 3 Allied Arts 100 3 

English 101 , 102 6 Art Education 207 3 

Health & Safety Education 101 3 Biology/Science : 3 

History 3 English 300 3 

Mathematics 3 Health & Safety Education 311 3 

Social Science 3 Psychology 110 3 

Recommended Elective 3 Speech Communication 111 3 

Recreation 200, 203 Recommended Elective 3 

2 activities 8 Recreation 210, 21 1 , 322, 323, 

2 activities K) 

32 34 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 333 3 Health & Safety Education 435 3 

Health & Safety Education 414 3 Recommended Electives 14 

Philosophy 151, 233 6 Recreation 424, 432, 441, 443 

Music 365 3 2 activities 14 

Recommended Elective 3 Social Science 3 

Recreation 212, 341, 342, 350, 

402, 422, 2 activities \6 _ 

34 34 

REC 403 Field Work (9 hrs. to be taken during the senior year when required) 



DEPARTMENT OF 
INTRAMURAL-RECREATIONAL SPORTS 

Louis Marciani, Chairman 
Stephen Rey 
The Department of Intramural-Recreational Sports in the School of Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation provides the University population with a wide variety of leisure 
time activities. 

The competitive intramural sports program offers over forty sports featuring team, 
dual, and individual competition. The program consists of the traditional flag football, 
basketball, and softball, to Co-Rec innertube water polo, frisbee, and tube basketball. The 



Sports/ 1 21 

program is open to all male and female undergraduate and graduate students in residence 
halls, fraternities, sororities, and off-campus housing, as well as faculty and staff. 

Numerous sports clubs are organized under the direction of this department. These 
clubs provide a program of instruction, recreation and/or competition. Some of the most 
popular clubs are Judo, Karate, Soccer, Women's Volleyball, and Softball. 

Informal recreation offers members of the University community varied opportunities 
to participate in self-directional recreational activities. The staff assists individuals in 
meeting their leisure needs and interests, whether it be a quick swim at the Natatorium, a 
racquetball game, or a pickup badminton game. 

A new dimension to the overall leisure needs provides opportunities for activities. An 
outdoor recreational rental center has been added offering such equipment as sleeping 
bags, canoes, and tents. In addition, several trips and seminars are planned for the coming 
year. 

Lake Sehoy is a recreational area just 3Vi miles northwest of the University of 
Southern Mississippi Campus. The 70 acre recreational facility is operated by the Universi- 
ty Intramural-Recreational Sports Department and the Golf Course for the benefit of 
students, faculty, staff, and alumni, and guests of USM. The natural setting of Lake Sehoy 
offers a diversity of outdoor and waterfront activities. 






SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 
ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 



DEPARTMENT MAJOR 



Emphasis 



DEGREE 4 



ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 

CLOTHING MERCHANDISING* BS 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES* BS 

INTERIOR DESIGN* BS 

FAMILY LD7E SERVICES 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT* BS 

HOME ECONOMICS IN EQUIPMENT* BS 

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIVING* BS 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION* BS 

INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION 

DIETETICS BS 

Coordinated Undergraduate Program 

Traditional Program 
FOOD AND NUTRITION* BS 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT ADMINISTRATION* BS 
INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT BS 



•Minor Available 
"Degree Abbreviations: (BS) Bachelor of Science 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Sarah L. Weaver Gibbs, Dean 

PURPOSE 

The curricula in the School of Home Economics are planned to place major emphasis 
on careers and on improving family life. Students are prepared to assume responsibilities in 
areas related to the various aspects of living concerned with the environment of the in- 
dividual, the family, and the community. 

ORGANIZATION 

The School of Home Economics is divided into four departments: Environmental 
Design, Family Life Services, Institution Administration, and Home Economics Educa- 
tion. 

Students majoring in any area of Home Economics should follow the program outlin- 
ed in their area of study. 

OFFERINGS FOR NON-MAJORS 

Courses may be selected for electives. Non-majors may take courses without taking the 
prerequisites with permission of the instructor. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 

Sue Sharp, Acting Chairman 
Easterling, E. Davis, Donnell, A. Stamper 

Three majors are currently offered in the Department of Environmental Design. They 
are clothing and textiles, clothing merchandising, and interior design. The department also 
serves the clothing, textiles, and design needs of other majors in the School of Home 
Economics and provides elective courses for non-majors. 

Each curriculum offers information and experiences that encourage students to 
develop their individual creative abilities in addition to developing strong professional 
ideals. 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 

Clothing and textiles majors find positions mainly through work with textile, fabric, 
and pattern companies, consumer education jobs with manufacturers, and in writing for 
magazines, newspapers, radio, and television, depending upon the specialized preparation 
and interest of the individual student. An adviser helps students select background courses 
for specialized areas. Some students pursue graduate work. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art 111 or 207 3 Clothing and Textiles 330. 

Chemistry 101 , 102 6 332 6 

Clothing and Textiles 131 3 Courses for Minor 3 

English 101 , 102 6 Economics 255, 256 6 

History 101 , 102 6 General Business Admins. 295 3 

Mathematics 101 3 Journalism 102 3 

Political Science 101 3 Marriage & Family Life 150 2 



124/School of Home Economics 



Speech Communication 1 11 3 



33 



Physical Education 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Sociology 101 3 

Elective -1 

32 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Clothing and Textiles 332, 333, Clothing and Textiles 328 or 

335, 431, 434 or EVD 331 15 435, 430 or 432, 433, 437 11-12 

Courses for Minor .9 Courses for Minor 9 

Humanities 315 3 Home Economics Education 478 1 

Elective i& Electives • •• g 

33 29-30 

TOTAL: 128 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 

All students pursuing a minor in this area must complete twenty-one (21) semester 
hours of clothing and textiles courses. Suggested courses to meet this requirement are as 

follows: „ 

Hours 



Clothing and Textiles 131, 330, 332, 333, 335, 431, 433 



21 



CLOTHING MERCHANDISING 

The clothing merchandising curriculum provides basic courses in clothing, textiles, 
economics, business, marketing, and field experience. With this background, graduates are 
prepared to move into executive training programs offered by large department stores 
throughout the country. Such training programs lead into positions as buyers, training 
supervisors, fashion coordinators, comparison shoppers, radio and television script 
writers, and numerous jobs involving some aspect of retailing. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN CLOTHING MERCHANDISING 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Art III 3 

Clothing and Textiles 131 

English 101, 



Accounting 201 3 

Applied Psychology 25 1 3 



102 6 Clothing and Textiles 221 3 



Fundamentals of Science 104 3 

History 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 101 3 

Physical Education 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Sociology 101 3 



32 



Economics 6 

Fundamentals of Science 105 3 

Journalism 3 

Marketing 300 3 

Political Science 101 3 

Social Competencies 1 50 2 

Speech Communication 111 .J 

32 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Clothing and Textiles 328, 330, Clothing and Textiles 435, 

332, 335, 337 14 436, 437, 439, 492 16 

Management 360 3 Marketing 442, elec 6 

Marketing 330, 342, 355, elec 12 Home Economics Education 478 I 

Elective A Electives l* 

TOTAL: 128 



35 



Family Life Services/ 125 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN CLOTHING MERCHANDISING 

All students pursuing a minor in this area must complete twenty-six (26) semester 
hours. Suggested courses to meet this requirement are as follows: 

Clothing and Textiles 131, 328, 330, 337, 435, 436 17 

Marketing 300, 330, 342 9 

INTERIOR DESIGN 

The interior design program is for the student planning a professional career designing 
interior spaces within the human environment. It is an interdisciplinary approach derived 
for the professional needs and responsibilities of the interior designer. The curriculum con- 
tains courses in applied design (EVD) as well as related disciplines. 

Career opportunities exist in the following areas: architectural and industrial designing 
firms, department and furniture stores, furniture and textile manufacturing companies, 
hotel and restaurant chains, antique dealers, self-employment, etc. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN INTERIOR DESIGN 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Architectural Technology 132 3 

Drawing 101 , 102 6 

English 101, 102 6 

Environmental Design 140, 240 6 

Fundamentals of Science 6 

History 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 101 3 



Art History 334 3 

Clothing and Textiles 330 3 

Design 111, 112 6 

Environmental Design 241, 

332 6 

Housing & Home Management 

339, 341 

Political Science 101 



36 



6 

3 

Psychology 110 3 

3 

J 

36 



Sociology 101 

Speech Communication 



111 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Art 301 3 

Art History 335 3 

Clothing & Textiles 434 3 

Environmental Design 331, 340, 440, 

441 12 

Housing & Home Management 342, 

343 6 

Marketing 330, 365 6 

Marriage & Family Life 1 50 2 

Physical Education /2 

36 



Environmental Design 342, 

442 9 

Marketing 342 3 

Home Economics Education 478 1 

Electives 7 



TOTAL: 



20 
128 



DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY LIFE SERVICES 

Altra H. Hamman, Chairman 
Coghill, Dickerson, Lancaster, Rogers, Tuggle 

The Department of Family Life Services offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Child 
Development with Nursery-Kindergarten Teacher Certification; Home Economics in 
Equipment; and Marriage and Family Living. A two-year course in child development 
which leads to a certificate is offered for Child Care Center directors and teachers. 



126/School of Home Economics 



NURSERY SCHOOL 



The University Nursery School was established in 1929 as a unit within the School of 
Home Economics to provide a laboratory in which students might observe the development 
and relationships of a group of normal, healthy, young children and participate in directing 
the various nursery school activities. The school accommodates children between the ages 
of three and five years. It operates on a half-day schedule from 8:30 to 11 :45 in the morn- 
ing, five days a week, throughout the year. 

The daily program is planned to create an environment rich in possibilities for develop- 
ing the child's mental, physical, and social self as well as attaining a greater degree of emo- 
tional maturity. The enrollment is made up of an equal number of boys and girls in the 
various age groups from town, faculty, and student families. 

The Nursery School, which was the first to be established in Mississippi, is located on 
the first floor of the Home Economics Building. It has ample space indoors and a large 
porch and fenced-in play area outdoors. In both space and equipment it meets high stan- 
dards. The climate permits outdoor play the year round. Requests for registration must be 
filed with the Director of the Nursery School well in advance of the time the child is to be 
enrolled. Any child who meets the age and development requirements may qualify. 

INFANT DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

The Infant Development Center, the newest child development laboratory, provides 
learning experiences in observation and participation with children less than three years of 
age. Students are able to observe and to work with two-year-olds in a morning play group 
and to care for infants who are given all day care. This Center increases the opportunities 
for home economics majors to observe, study, and participate with children from infancy 
through preschool years. The child development program enriches the home economics ma- 
jor by providing learning experiences that develop competencies in understanding infants 
and young children. 



CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

(N-K Emphasis) 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Art Education 207 3 Art Education 309 3 

English 101, 102 6 Child Development 350, 351 6 

Food and Nutrition 163 3 Food and Nutrition 261 3 

Fundamentals of Science 131, Fundamentals of Science 132 or 

133 6 134 3 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 Health and Safety Education 

History 101, 102 or 140, 141 6 310 2 

Physical Education elective 2 Marriage and Family Living 150 2 

Speech Communication 111 3 Mathematics 210 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Social Science elective .J± 

32 31 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Child Development 450, 451, Child Development 453, 454, 

452 9 455 10 

Curriculum and Instruction: Curriculum and Instruction: 

Elementary Education 317 3 Elementary Education 301, 

Educational Psychology 370 3 403, 422 12 



Child Development/ 127 



Food and Nutrition 363 3 

Home Economics Education 478 1 

Housing and Home Management 345 

442, 443 10 

Marriage and Family Living 351 ._3 

32 



Electives 2 

English 301 3 

Mathematics 310 3 

Music Education 361 3 



TOTAL: 



33 
128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

All students pursuing a minor in this area must complete eighteen (18) semester hours 
in Child Development. Suggested courses to meet this requirement are as follows: 

Hours 



Child Development 350, 351, 450, 45 1 , 452, 453 



TWO-YEAR CERTIFICATE COURSE 
IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Art Education 207 3 

Child Development 350, 351 6 

English 101 3 

Food and Nutrition 363 3 

Fundamentals of Science 131 3 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

Mathematics 210 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Sociology 101 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 



33 



Child Development 450, 451, 

452, 453 12 

Curriculum and Instruction: 

Elementary Education 317, 

403 6 

Educational Psychology 370 3 

English 102 3 

Health and Safety Education 

310 2 

Marriage and Family Living 

150, 351 J 

31 
TOTAL: 64 



HOUSING AND HOME MANAGEMENT 

The increasing opportunities for home economists in business with utility companies 
and manufacturers of equipment for the home have created many positions for those with 
the necessary educational background. The major, Home Economics in Equipment, is 
designed for those preparing for such careers. 

HOME ECONOMICS IN EQUIPMENT 
REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN HOME ECONOMICS IN EQUIPMENT 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art Education 207 3 

Biology 101 4 

Clothing and Textiles 131 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Food and Nutrition 163 3 

History 101, 102 or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 120 or 101 3 

Physical Education elective 2 

Speech Communication 111 3 



33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Child Development 350 

Clothing and Textiles 332 

Elective 

Food and Nutrition 261 

Marriage and Family Living 150 

Microbiology 261 

Psychology 110 

Political Science 101 

Radio-Television-Film 271 

Sociology 101 

Speech Communication 210 



1 28/SchooI of Home Economics 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Clothing and Textiles 330 or Elective 3 

334 43 J 6 Food and Nutrition 430 3 

Elective 3 Home Economics Education 402, 478 .. 5 

Food and Nutrition 362 3 Housing and Home Management 

Home Economics Education 301 , 340, 441 , 442, 443 19 

302 6 

Housing and Home Management 345 
401 6 

Institution Administration 370 3 

Marriage and Family Living 351 3 

Marketing 330 ^3 

32 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIFE 

Marriage today is becoming widely recognized as the most important vocation for 
which young people can prepare. 

The objectives of the marriage and family life curriculum are two-fold: first, to assist 
college students to grow into intelligent, effective, and satisfying family members in their 
own homes; and second, to prepare them for a career of service in working with families, 
youth, and the elderly. 

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIVING 
REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIVING 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 101 , 102 or Micro- Art Education 207 . . 3 

biology 261 8 Child Development 350 3 

English 101 102 6 Food and Nutrition 261, 362 6 

Food and Nutrition 163 3 Health and Safety Education 310 2 

History 101, 102 or 140, 141 6 Marriage and Family Living 150, 

Mathematics 120 or 101 3 151 .. J 

Physical Education elective 2 Psychology 1 10 ...... - . . . J 

Political Science 101 3 Speech Communication 111 3 

Sociology 101 J Sociology 230, 240 -A 

34 31 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Child Development 451 3 Elective ............ ... • 

Educational Psychology 372 3 Health and Safety Education 422 

Finance 320 3 430 J ' ' ' ' 'J * V.' V ' ' V«V 

Home Economics Education 302, Marriage and Family Living 452, 

478 '---- * 490 



12 



Housing and Home Management 340 .... 3 Psychology 456 3 

Marriage and Family Living 35 1 , Sociology 424, 444, 450 * 



451 6 

Sociology 314, 330, 33 1 J 

31 



32 
TOTAL: 128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIVING 

All students pursuing a minor in this area must complete twenty (20) hours in marriage 
and family and child development courses. Suggested courses to meet this requirement are 
as follows: 



Dietetics/ 129 



Hours 



Marriage and Family Life 150, 151, 351, 451, 452 14 

Child Development 350, 45 1 J> 

20 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION 

(FOOD AND NUTRITION) 
(HOTEL AND RESTAURANT ADMINISTRATION) 

Margaret McCarthy, Chairman 
Adler, Boudreaux, Broome, Gibbs, Landry, Wilgus 

This area provides courses in foods, nutrition, institution administration, dietetics, 
and hotel and restaurant administration for undergraduate and graduate students. Some of 
the basic courses may be elected by non-majors from other schools of the University or by 
those selecting minors in food and nutrition or institution management. 

Students selecting Institution Administration as a major can prepare for positions in 
public health, extension, research, journalism, commerical organizations, dietitians in 
hospitals, government services, clinics or consultants in restaurants, hotels, motels, country 
clubs, school food service, industry, and related fields depending upon their minor. 

The Coordinated Undergraduate Program includes experience in the last two years of 
the program. Upon completion of degree, the student is eligible to take the registration ex- 
amination for registered dietitians. 

The Institution Management-Dietetics curriculum meets the academic requirements 
for membership in the American Dietetic Association and qualifies the student for an in- 
ternship approved by the association. Institution Management and Food and Nutrition cur- 
riculas may also lead to meeting academic requirements in the American Dietetic Associa- 
tion. 

Hotel and Restaurant Administration curriculum prepares students for positions in the 
travel and hospitality industry, college and university food service, clubs and in related 
businesses. 

A two-year certificate course is available for school lunch managers. The School of 
Home Economics in cooperation with the State Department of Education sponsors an an- 
nual School Lunch Managers Workshop. 

CHARCOAL ROOM 

The Charcoal Room is a modern academic laboratory for Institution Management ma- 
jors. The Charcoal Room is in the University Commons which is centrally located on the 
campus. 

The facility provides good food of high quality in attractive surroundings for con- 
genial association of faculty members, staff, and graduate students with their collegues, 
guests, and families. It also offers an excellent stimulating experience and training center 
for Institution Management majors under the guidance of the institution management 
faculty. 

DIETETICS 

Suggested minors are: for food and nutrition majors— chemistry or journalism; for in- 
stitution management-dietetics majors— chemistry, general science, or health; and for in- 
stitution management majors— chemistry, marketing, accounting, biology, economics, art, 
or management. 



1 30/School of Home Economics 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN DIETETICS 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 101 4 

Chemistry 101 4 

English 101, 102 6 

Food and Nutrition 163, 261 6 

History 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 101 3 

Physical Education 2 

Psychology 110 Ji 

34 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 201 3 

Biology 220, 221 8 

Chemistry 251, 321 8 

Economics 255 3 

Food and Nutrition 260 or 362 3 

Microbiology 261 4 

Sociology 101 3 

Speech Communication 111 ^_3 

35 



COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN DIETETICS 
DEVELOPMENTAL ACCREDITATION 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Economics 301 3 

Food and Nutrition 265, 365, 463 11 

Home Economics Education 301 3 

Institution Administration 473, 475 ... 12 

Management 360 ._3 

32 



SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 332 

Food and Nutrition 460, 464, 465, 
466, 492 



TOTAL 



30 



33 
134 



TRADITIONAL PROGRAM 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Economics 301 3 

English 332 3 

Food and Nutrition 430 3 

Home Economics Education 301 3 

Institution Administration 370, 471, 

472, 476 13 

Management 360 3 

Electives ._3 

31 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Food and Nutrition 460, 461 6 

Home Economics Education 478 1 

Institution Administration 470, 474 . . . . 6 

Management 364 3 

Electives 12 



TOTAL: 



28 

128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Biology 101 4 



Chemistry 101 

English 101, 102 

Food and Nutrition 163, 261 

History 101, 102 

Mathematics 101 



4 

6 

6 

6 

3 

Physical Education 2 



31 



Chemistry 251, 321 8 

Computer Science and Statistics 100 ... 3 

Food and Nutrition 362 3 

General Business Administration 100... 3 

Microbiology 261 4 

Political Science 101 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Sociology 101 3 

Speech Communication 111 ^ 

33 



Food and Nutrition/131 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 201 3 

Allied Arts 100 3 

Economics 255 3 

Home Economics Education 301 3 

Institution Administration 370, 

472,476 10 

Management 360 3 

Electives Jb 

31 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Food and Nutrition 430, 460 6 

Home Economics Education 478 1 

Institution Administration 460, 47 1,474 . .9 

Management 364, 454 6 

Marketing 300 3 

Electives 8 



TOTAL: 



33 
128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 

All students pursuing a minor in this area must complete twenty (20) semester hours in 
food and nutrition and institution administration courses. Suggested courses to meet this 
requirement are as follows: 

Hours 

Food and Nutrition 163, 261 , 362, 460 12 

Institution Administration 472, 476 8 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Biology 101 4 

Chemistry 101 , 102 8 

English 101, 102 6 

Food and Nutrition 163 3 

History 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 101 3 

Physical Education 2 



32 



Allied Arts 100 3 

Chemistry 25 1 , 252 8 

Food and Nutrition 261 , 362 6 

Marriage and Family Life 150 2 

Political Science 101 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Sociology 101 3 

Speech Communication 111 ._3 

31 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Chemistry 321 4 

Child Development 350 3 

Economics 256 3 

Food and Nutrition 430 3 

Home Economics 301 3 

Institution Administration 370 2 

Marriage and Family Life 351 3 

Microbiology 261 4 

Minor Requirements ^ 

34 



Food and Nutrition 460, 461 6 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

Home Economics Education 478 I 

Housing and Home Management 345 . . 3 

Minor Requirements 12 

Electives 6 



TOTAL: 



31 

128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 

All students pursuing a minor in this area must complete twenty (20) semester hours of 
food and nutrition and institution administration courses. Suggested courses to meet this 
requirement are as follows: 

Hours 

Food and Nutrition 163,261,362,430,460,461 18 

Institution Administration 370 2 



132/School of Home Economics 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN HOTEL 
AND RESTAURANT ADMINISTRATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 

Biology 101 4 

English 101, 102 6 

History 101, 102 6 

Hotel and Restaurant 

Administration 179 3 

Mathematics 101 3 

Physical Education 2 

Sociology 101 .3 

30 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 201 , 202 6 

Computer Science 100 3 

Institution Administration 272, 273 .... 6 

Management 360 3 

Microbiology 261 3 

Physics 110 3 

Political Science 101 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Psychology 110 .3 

33 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Economics 256 3 

Food and Nutrition 2 

Hotel and Restaurant 

Administration 475, 476 6 

Institution Administration 471, 

472, 476 11 

Management 364, 454 6 

Marketing 330 3 

Electives 2 



Hotel andRestaurant 

Administration 479, 480, 481 , 482 18 

InstitutionAdministration 474 3 

Management 472 3 

Electives 8 



33 32 

TOTAL: 128 
A minimum of 400 hours of employment in hotel, motel or foodservice is required. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN HOTEL AND 

RESTAURANT ADMINISTRATION 

All students pursuing a minor in this area must complete twenty-two (22) semester 
hours in Hotel and Restaurant Administration and Institution Administration courses. 
Suggested courses to meet this requirement are as follows: 

Hours 

Hotel and Restaurant Administration 179, 475, 476, 480, 481, 482 18 

Institution Administration 472 4 



TWO-YEAR CERTIFICATE COURSE 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Economics 100 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Food and Nutrition 163, 261 6 

History 101 3 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

Institution Administration 271, 272 . . . . 6 

Mathematics 199 3 

Electives ._} 

33 



SEM. HRS. 



Biology 101 4 

English 221 3 

Food and Nutrition 362 3 

Health and Safety Education 310 2 

Institution Administration 273 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Electives 13 



TOTAL: 



31 
64 



Education/133 

DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 
EDUCATION 

Mary E.Faulkinberry, Chairman 
G. Bryant, Milner 
The Home Economics Education curriculum includes the requirements for teacher cer- 
tification as set by the Mississippi State Department of Vocational Educational and 
qualifies graduates to teach in secondary schools under the requirements of the Federal 
Vocational Acts. Graduates are prepared to take places in the professional and business 
communities as teachers of home economics, home service directors for utility and 
manufacturing companies, home economist with the Cooperative Extension Service as well 
as employees in other agencies concerned with consumer and homemaking education. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS 

All students pursuing a major in Home Economics Education must complete the 
following reuqirements. A suggested sequence has been made but may vary according to in- 
dividual needs. 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Art Education 207 3 

Clothing and Textiles 131 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Food and Nutrition 163 3 

Fundamentals of Science 104 or 105, 

or Chemistry 101 3 

History 101 , 102 or 140, 141 6 

Marriage and Family Life 150 2 

Math 101 or 120 3 

Physical Education 2 



31 
JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Child Development 350 3 

Curriculum and Instruction-Secondary 

310 3 

Educational Psychology 374 3 

Food and Nutrition 362 3 

Home Economics Education 301 , 302 .... 6 
Housing and Home Management 340, 

345,442,443 13 

Marriage and Family Life 351 or 

451 J 

34 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Clothing and Textiles 330 3 

Educational Psychology 372 3 

English 203 or 300 or 301 3 

Food and Nutrition 261 3 

Fundamentals of Science 106 or 

107, or Microbiology 261 3 

Health 101 3 

Home Economics Education 478 1 

Political Science 101 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Science or Mathematics (elective) 3 

Sociology 101 3 

Speech Communication 111 ^3 

34 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Clothing and Textiles 333 3 

Curriculum and Instruction-Secondary 

313,422 6 

English 332 or 333 3 

Home Economics Education 

402,403 13 

Research and Foundations 469 3 

Special Education 400 3 



TOTAL: 



31 
130 



HONORS COLLEGE 

Wallace G. Kay, Dean 

Richard H. Bowers, Associate Director 

Conklin, Koeppel, R. Moorman, Pessoney, P. Prenshaw, Tharpe, 

J. Thrash, Ward, Zaninelli 

The Honors College was established July 1, 1976, as an expansion and reorganization 
of the former Honors Center. The purpose of the Honors College is to provide superior 
students with a broadly-based, humanistic undergraduate education; to give a proper set- 
ting and perspective to their more specialized studies, and to challenge them to their best ef- 
forts. Its aim is to identify, encourage, and reward academic excellence in all fields and to 
serve students with widely varying academic interests, awarding degrees cum laude, magna 
cum laude, and summa cum laude. 

To enter the College as freshmen, students compete with other applicants on the basis 
of five criteria; high school grades, scores on the American College Test, detailed ratings by 
two high school teachers and the principal or guidance counselor, a personal interview with 
Honors Council representatives, and an extemporaneous essay. Entrance after the first 
semester of the freshman year requires a minimum quality point average of 3.0 and a letter 
of recommendation from one college instructor. 

Students are in good standing in the College as long as they maintain a 3.0 overall 
average. Entering freshmen have two semesters to achieve a 3.0 average; students whose 
averages fall below 3.0 are suspended from the College until such time as their averages 
again reach 3.0. However, students whose averages fall below 3.0 but are above 2.91 are 
given one semester's probation; they may continue in the College for one semester but must 
raise their averages to 3.0 or be suspended following that semester. 

Honors College students will not be required to fulfill the course requirements of the 
University Core curriculum, though its general educational purposes will certainly be met 
by the Honors College requirements. 

Students wishing to graduate through the Honors College will normally meet the re- 
quirements listed below, though students entering the Honors College after the first 
semester of their freshman year may be permitted some substitutions. 



TYPICAL FOUR-YEAR SCHEDULE FOR MEETING 
HONORS REQUIREMENTS 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Honors 111, 112 6 

Honors 121, 122 2 

Honors 131 3 

Honors 321, 322* .J. 

13 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Honors 301, 303 4 

Honors 302, 401, or 402 
1 

1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Honors 211, 212, 6 

Honors 221, 222 4 

Honors 23 1 3 

Honors 321, 322* .J. 

15 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Honors 403**, 490*** 6 

Honors 302, 401 , or 402 1 

Honors 492 1J 

8-io 



•A total of four (4) hours in Honors 321 and 322 is required. The four (4) hours may be spread over four 
(4) years. 

"May be taken junior or senior year. 
•••Must be taken during final semester. 



Honors College/ 135 

In addition to the above, all Honors students must take six to twelve (6-12) hours, 
depending on placement, of a foreign language, which may be started as late as Year III; 
nine (9) hours of science, at least one course of which must be a laboratory course; three (3) 
hours of mathematics (College Algebra or higher, preferably calculus), and two (2) hours 
of PE, Band, or ROTC. Honors students must meet only these requirements plus those of 
the major and minor which will be selected in any college or school in the University. 

Total Honors Core Requirements 61-69 

In addition to the course requirements listed above, Honors students must pass com- 
prehensive examinations in their major fields. 

The Senior Honors Project involves two phases, the prospectus and the project itself. 
The prospectus must be presented nine months prior to graduation; guidelines for the pro- 
spectus may be obtained from the Honors College Office. The exact nature of the project 
itself is a matter for decision in discussion between the student and the proper represen- 
tatives of his major department. However, certain general guidelines should be observed, as 
follows: the project should reflect significant individual effort which may involve library 
research, laboratory research, or field research. The project should conform to accepted 
scholarly procedure within the discipline of the major field. The project may be creative, as 
opposed to derivative, at the discretion of the department chairman involved and subject to 
the specific approval of the Dean of the Honors College; however, a creative project must 
be executed within the framework of accepted scholarly procedure. That is, a student who 
produces a creative effort should introduce that effort by adequate discussion of the nature 
of the creative form involved, including an indication of familiarity with other examples of 
that form. The project must be done in the area of the student's major unless specific ap- 
proval is given by the Honors Council for a project in the area of his minor. A joint project 
by two or more students is permissible if specifically approved by the appropriate depart- 
ment chairman and by the Dean of the Honors College. Any doubts as to the validity of a 
proposed project should be resolved in discussion among the project director, the ap- 
propriate chairman, and the Honors Dean. Directions for the format of the senior project 
may be secured from the Honors College Office. 

The comprehensive examination must be taken no later than four weeks before the stu- 
dent is scheduled to graduate. The examination may be either written or oral, at the option 
of the major department. The exact nature of the examination is a matter for decision by 
the department involved, but there are general guidelines: 

(l)The examination should be designed so that it can be completed in a maximum of 
three hours. 

(2) The examination should test the candidate's general knowledge of the field of his 
major rather than specialized information about some particular aspect of his ma- 
jor. 

(3) The examination should be uniform for all candidates within a particular semester. 

(4) It is the responsibility of the student to contact the department chairman and re- 
quest that the comprehensive examination be designed and administered. These ar- 
rangements should be made one semester in advance. 

Graduation Recognition 

Honors graduates receive the distinction, written upon their diplomas, of being 
Honors College Graduates in the departments of their majors. If their academic average is 
high enough, they also receive the distinction of summa cum laude (3.8 overall average), 
magna cum laude (3.5 overall average), or cum laude (3.25 overall average). 

Financial Assistance 

Students enrolled in the Honors College may apply for financial aid through the Office 
of Financial Aid on the same basis as any other student. Two types of scholarships 
available only to Honors students are listed below. 

(1) Presidential Scholars: Each year, the President of the University will select four 
freshmen to be Presidential Scholars. These students must have been accepted by the 
Honors College, so they will follow admission procedures for Honors except that ihey will 
have a final interview with the President of the University. Applicants are expected to have 



136/Honors College 

superior ACT scores and high school grade point averages; they are also expected to have 
proven leadership ability. 

Presidential scholarships are underwritten by the Alumni Association and are in the 
amount of $8480, payable in $1060 increments at registration each semester until gradua- 
tion. 

(2) University Scholars: Each year, up to forty-six freshmen will be designated Univer- 
sity Scholars. These students must have been accepted by the Honors College, so they will 
follow admission procedures for Honors except that they may have a final interview with 
the Vice-President for Academic Affairs. Applicants must have ACT scores of 28 or above 
and high school grade point averages of 3.5 or better. 

University scholarships are in the amount of $1400 and are payable in $175 increments 
at registration each semester until graduation. 

THE UNIVERSITY PROGRAM SERIES 

The University Forum 

Each semester, programs will be offered combining presentations in humanities, in 
science, and in social science. The one-hour, pass-fail courses feature such things as na- 
tionally known speakers, outstanding films, panels, and other enrichment programs. This 
series is open to all students of the University and may be repeated for up to eight (8) hours 
credit. See course descriptions for HON 321 , 322. 

THE HUMANITIES PROGRAM 

The Honors College offers a minor in humanities as outlined below. This minor is 
open both to Honors students and to general students. Particularly designed for the student 
who plans a career in college teaching, the humanities minor is a combination of culturally- 
oriented courses from the classics, literature, science, social science, art, and music. The re- 
quirements for a minor are as follows: 

A. One course from each of the following groups: 

Hours 

HUM 210, 3 16 (Science) 3 

HUM 310, 313 (Classics) 3 

HUM 314, 315 (Art and Music) 3 

HUM 380, 382 (Social Science) 3 

HUM 410, 412 (Western Literature) 3 

B. Foreign Language (for Honors College students 300 level or above) 6 

Total 21 

TUTORIAL OPTION FOR MAJOR FIELD 

An Honors student may elect to define a major through tutorial studies, subject to the 
availability of faculty tutors and the specific approval of both the department chairman in- 
volved and the Dean of the Honors College. The tutorial option will normally involve a full 
academic year of continous concentrated study in the major area. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 



Department 



Major 



Emphasis 



Degree**' 



COMMUNICATION (DIVISION) 

COMMUNICATION* 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE* 



ENGLISH 



ENGLISH* 



Teaching English to Speakers 
of Other Languages 



LINGUISTICS* 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

CLASSICS* 
FRENCH* 
GERMAN* 
SPANISH* 

GEOGRAPHY AND AREA DEVELOPMENT 

COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING* 
Urban and Transportation Planning 
Environmental Planning 



HISTORY 



JOURNALISM 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

PHILOSOPHY* 

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION* 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PARALEGAL STUDIES* 
POLITICAL SCIENCE* 
(PRELAW)** 



BA, BS 
BA, BS 
BA, BS 
BA 



BA, BS 

BA, BS 

BA, BS 

BA, BS 



BS 



ECONOMICS* 


BA 




GEOGRAPHY* 


BA, 


BS 


AMERICAN STUDIES* 


BA, 


BS 


HISTORY* 


BA, 


BS 


LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES* 


BA, 


BS 


Latin American Trade and Finance 






SOCIAL STUDIES* 


BA, 


BS 


ADVERTISING* 


BA, 


BS 


JOURNALISM* 


BA, 


BS 


Journalism Education 






News-Editorial 






Photojournalism 






Public Relations 







BA, BS 
BA, BS 



BA, BS 
BA, BS 



RADIO, TELEVISION, AND FILM 

RADIO, TELEVISION, AND FILM BA, BS 

Broadcast Journalism 
Broadcast Management and Sales 
Film 
Radio-Television Production 

SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANTHROPOLOGY* BA, BS 

ASIAN STUDIES*** 

SOCIOLOGY* BA, BS 

SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCES 

AUDIOLOGY* BA, BS 

EDUCATION OF THE DEAF* BA, BS 

LANGUAGE DISORDERS* BA, BS 

SPEECH PATHOLOGY* BA, BS 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION* BA, BS 



*Minor Available 
••This program does not lead to a degree. Students completing pre-professional programs will select an 
academic major with an emphasis in the appropriate pre-professional area. 
•••Minor Only Available 
••••Degree Abbreviations: (BA) Bachelor of Arts, (BS) Bachelor of Science 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

James H. Sims, Dean 
Glenn T. Harper, Assistant Dean 

The College of Liberal Arts provides a broad cultural and educational experience to 
help students acquire the means of making self-education the rewarding enterprise of a 
lifetime as well as to guide them in their preparation to serve both society and their own 
self-interests productively and responsibly. Students are encouraged to widen their in- 
terests, to develop mature habits of observation and reading in the major areas of man's 
cultural heritage, and to learn to think logically, communicate effectively, and judge wise- 
ly. Traditional disciplines offer studies towards majors and minors, some interdisciplinary 
programs are available, and some departments offer postbaccalaureate degrees. For in- 
formation concerning the latter, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

The College of Liberal Arts is organized into fourteen departments: Aerospace 
Studies, Criminal Justice, English, Foreign Languages, Geography and Area Development, 
History, Journalism, Military Science, Philosophy and Religion, Political Science, Radio, 
Television, and Film, Sociology and Anthropology, Speech and Hearing Sciences, and 
Speech Communication. The Departments of Aerospace Studies and Military Science have 
no academic major or minor. Other departments offer both majors and minors. 

Listed below are the common requirements for both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 
of Science degrees. The suggested sequence may be modified to meet a student's specific 
program and schedule needs. A student entering the College of Liberal Arts will be assigned 
to the appropriate department chairman for academic advisement. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN THE 
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 6 English (203 and 204 are 

(English 100 does not satisfy recommended.) 6 

core requirements.) Foreign Language 6 

Foreign Language 6 (Fewer hours may suffice, but a 

History (101 and 102 or 140 course at intermediate level II 

and 141 are recommended.) 6 must be completed; see Foreign 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is Languages course descriptions.) 

recommended.) 3 Other courses (from the following 

Physical Education or ROTC/AFROTC areas, with no more than three 

(This requirement may also be hours from any one area: Allied 

met by participation in Arts 100 or Music 365, anthropology, 

varsity athletics or associated geography, political science, 

activities.) 2 philosophy, speech communication, 

Science ^6 sociology) j2 

29 24 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM, HRS. 

English 332, 333, or 334 3 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN THE 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 6 English (203 and 204 are 

(English 100 does not satisfy recommended.) 6 

core requirements.) Other courses (from the following 



140/College of Liberal Arts 

History (101 and 102 or 140 areas, with no more than three 

and 141 are recommended.) 6 hours from any one area: Allied 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is Arts 100 or Music 365, anthropology, 

recommended.) 3 economics, geography, Health and 

Physical Education or ROTC/AFROTC Safety Education 101 , philosophy, 

(This requirement may also be political science, psychology, 

met by participation in speech communication, sociology). ... 21 

varsity athletics or associated 
activities.) 2 

Science ,_6 

29 27 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (332, 333 or 334 is 

recommended.) 3 



SECONDARY TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

A student in the College of Liberal Arts seeking certification at the secondary level 
must satisfy not only the Liberal Arts core requirements but also the core requirements of 
the College of Education and Psychology. In addition he must complete the following pro- 
fessional education courses: Research and Foundations 400 (Public Education in the 
United States), Research and Foundations 469 (Tests and Measurements), Educational 
Psychology 372 (Human Growth and Development Part II: Adolescent), Educational 
Psychology 374 (Educational Psychology), Secondary Education 313 (Principles of 
Teaching in High School), Secondary Education 451-465 (a methods course in the student's 
academic area), and Secondary Education 481-494 (student teaching in the student's 
academic area). 

Effective September 1981, certification will require the following additional courses: 
Secondary Education 310 (Junior-Senior High School Reading Methods), Secondary 
Education 422 (Career Education), Special Education 400 (Psychology and Education of 
the Exceptional Child). 



INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS 

A major and a minor in Advertising, American Studies, Communiry and Regional 
Planning, Latin American Studies, Linguistics, Paralegal Studies, and Social Studies are 
administered by the College of Liberal Arts and involve an interdisciplinary curriculum. A 
minor emphasis in Asian Studies is another interdisciplinary program in the College of 
Liberal Arts. Each program is outlined in the major department section. 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 

Robert C. Rhodes, Director 

The Speech and Hearing Clinic is operated by the Department of Speech and Hearing 
Sciences in the College of Liberal Arts, but it works with the College of Education and 
Psychology in the preparation of Special Education teachers. The Clinic is located in the 
Speech, Hearing, and Special Education Building. 

This Clinic has a dual function. It provides facilities for the training of specialists in 
the areas of audiology, education of the deaf, and speech/language disorders as well as pro- 
viding clinical services for individuals with hearing and speech/language problems. 

The Clinic's services include diagnostic examinations and therapy programs for both 
children and adults who have speech or hearing problems. These services are available to 
both University students and members of the community at nominal fees. 



Aerospace Studies/ 1 4 1 

School For Children With Language Disorders 

N. Etoile DuBard, Director 

The School for Children with Language Disorders is part of the Department of Speech 
and Hearing Sciences. It is a laboratory school for children with language and speech 
disorders related to hearing impairments, aphasia, or dyslexia. Children may be enrolled 
full-time or part-time or on an out-client basis according to their needs. Diagnostic evalua- 
tions are available for children with language and learning problems. 

Financial support is provided by Forrest-Lamar Counties United Way, the State 
Department of Education, and fees. 

University students, upon completing specific courses, may obtain supervised clinical 
practicum in the school for either academic credit or clock hours. 

DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES 
(AIR FORCE ROTC) 

James E. Conroy, Chairman 
Bradley, Daugherty, Gecewicz 
The Air Force ROTC Program offers a course of study leading to a commission as a 
Second Lietuenant in response to Air Force needs. The Air Force ROTC Program is an ac- 
credited part of the curricula of the University. Completion of AFROTC waives the 
academic minor requirements. Courses within the General Military Course may also be 
substituted for physical education requirements. 

AFROTC REQUIREMENTS 

Students may enroll in AFROTC if they meet the following requirements: 
General Military Course: Men and women who are full-time University students may 
enroll in the General Military Course (GMC). The GMC courses are directed towards an in- 
depth survey of the Professional Officer Course and towards the missions and activities of 
the United States Air Force. There is no obligation associated with enrollment in any GMC 
course. The Professor of Aerospace Studies may grant credit or partial credit for comple- 
tion of the GMC for students who have served on active duty, for junior or senior level 
ROTC participation in a program of any service, and for Civil Air Patrol work. 

Professional Officer Course: Enrollment in the Professional Officer Course (POC) is 
limited to those students who have applied and have been accepted for this course. Applica- 
tion is normally made while a member of the GMC or (for students not enrolled in the 
GMC) early during the academic year prior to the year of desired entry. Students with 
previous military service may apply for direct entry. Individuals entering the POC must 
have two academic years remaining in college as full-time students at the undergraduate 
and/or graduate level. All POC students are obligated to accept a commission after com- 
pleting their studies and to enter the active duty Air Force. 

DESCRIPTION OF BASIC PROGRAMS 

Students who enter Air Force ROTC classes are considered to be in the Four-, Three-, 
or Two-Year Programs depending on their academic progress upon entry. Enrollment in 
the General Military Course offers the student maximum exposure to the Air Force without 
obligation and also affords maximum opportunity for scholarships and entry into the Pro- 
fessional Officer Course. The POC is normally preceded by either a four or six week orien- 
tation period conducted at various Air Force bases. USM students usually go to Florida, 
Alabama, Texas, or California area bases for this orientation. Financial entitlements while 
in the POC normally total about $2,500 for non-scholarship students. 

AFROTC COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

A combined institutional and Aerospace Studies committee nominates qualified 
freshman, sophomore, and junior cadets to compete for three and one-half, three, two and 



142/College of Liberal Arts 

one-half and two year scholarships. Scholarships cover tuition, books, fees, supplies, and 
equipment, plus a $100 per month tax-free subsistence allowance. Scholarships are awarded 
on the basis of specific academic majors needed in the Air Force and to students who want 
to become pilots, navigators, or missile officers. Interested students should contact the 
Department of Aerospace Studies. 

Four-year scholarships are also available to high school students. High school students 
interested in making application should write: Air Force ROTC (RRUF), Maxwell AFB, 
Alabama 361 12 during their junior year or before December of their senior year. 

SUPPLEMENTAL COURSE PROGRAM (SCP) 

Satisfactory completion of courses in English composition and mathematical reason- 
ing are required for scholarship and POC students respectively. Completion of the Univer- 
sity core will normally fulfill SCP requirements. 

FLIGHT INSTRUCTION PROGRAM 

The Flight Instruction Program (FIP) provides academic training to selected Profes- 
sional Officer Course students. Flight training is conducted by a local accredited civilan fly- 
ing school. The ground school (academic) portion is conducted by the Department of 
Aerospace Studies and includes theory of flight, weather, navigation, communications pro- 
cedures, and Federal Aviation regulations. 

DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 

Air Force ROTC students are eligible for membership in Arnold Air Society and to 
participate in departmental activities. Arnold Air Society is a national service organization 
and sponsor of Angel Flight, a national coed service organization. Other departmental ac- 
tivities include orientation flights, visits to area bases, intramural sports, Dining-In, and 
Dining-Out. 



DIVISION OF COMMUNICATION 

James L. Hall, Coordinator 

The Division of Communication offers an interdisciplinary major and minor involving 
the Departments of Speech Communication, Journalism, and Radio, Television, and Film. 
It is designed to prepare students for careers as communication specialists within business 
and industrial organizations, government agencies, trade and professional associations, or 
public institutions. A broad background in liberal arts and social sciences is recommended, 
and students are advised to concentrate their elective in these areas. A minor is not required 
for the Communication major. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN COMMUNICATION 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 



English 101 and 102 English (203 and 204 

(English 100 does not are recommended) 6 

satisfy core require- Foreign Language 

ments) 6 (fewer hours may 

Foreign Language 6 suffice, depending on 

History (101 and 102 or placement 6 

140 and 141 are recom- Journalism 102 3 

mended) 6 Other courses (from the 



Communication/143 



Mathematics (101 or 120 is 

recommended) 3 

Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC (this 

requirement may also be 

met by participation in 

varsity athletics or 

associated activities) 2 

Science 6 



29 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 332 3 

Journalism 421 3 

Management 360 3 

Radio, Television, and Film 340 3 

Radio, Television, and Film 

Elective 3 

Speech Communication 305, 311, 

350,403 12 

Electives .6 

33 



following areas, with 

no more than three hours 

from any one area: 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 

365, anthropology, 

geography, political 

science, philosophy, 

speech communication, 

sociology) 12 

Radio, Television, and Film 200 3 

Electives ._3 

33 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Journalism 425 3 

Journalism Elective 3 

Management 455 3 

Radio, Television, and Film 440 3 

Speech Communication 330, 410, 

417,450 12 

Electives 9 



TOTAL: 



33 
128 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

(English 100 does not 
satisfy core require- 
ments) 

History 101, 102 or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/ 

AFROTC (This requirement 2 

may also be met by partici- 2 

pation in varsity athletics 
or associated activities) 

Science 12 



29 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 332 3 

Journalism 42 1 3 

Management 360 3 

Radio, Television, and Film 340 3 

Radio, Television, and Film 

Elective 3 

Speech Communication 305, 311, 

Electives ,_6 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 203, 204 6 

Journalism 102 3 

Other Courses (from the 21 

following areas, with no 
more than three hours from 
any one area: Allied Arts 
100 or Music 365, anthropology, 
economics, geography, Health 
and Safety Education 101, 
philosophy, political science, 
psychology, speech communica- 
tion) 

Radio, Television, and Film 200 .3 

33 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Journalism 425 3 

Journalism Elective 3 

Management 455 3 

Radio, Television, and Film 440 3 

Speech Communication 330, 410, 417, 

450 12 

Electives 9 



TOTAL: 



33 
128 



144/College of Liberal Arts 

DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Tyler H. Fletcher, Chairman 
Alonzo, Devine, Dussich, LeFlore, Marx, Taylor 

The Department of Criminal Justice offers an interdisciplinary major leading to a 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, and a minor. Major fields of emphasis are 
offered in corrections, juvenile justice, and in law enforcement. 

Requirements for the major are thirty-three (33) hours of course work in criminal 
justice, not including the field practicum (CJ 400), and two blocks of study drawn from 
counseling psychology, political science, or sociology, depending upon the field of em- 
phasis selected. These interdisciplinary blocks contain 12 hours of advanced course work 
each, and are structured to strengthen understanding of the applied behavioral sciences. 
Courses in the juvenile justice concentration are specifically structured to meet the educa- 
tional guidelines of the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Mississippi, as pertains to 
youth services of the state. 

Special needs of the student to support other career demands can be met by changing 
the interdisciplinary blocks to; computer science, psychology, forensic science, manage- 
ment, philosophy, or geography and area development if approved by the department 
chairman. 

Requirements for the minor are eighteen (18) hours of course work in criminal justice, 
including CJ 200. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE CORE REQUIREMENTS 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 , 102 6 Criminal Justice 200 3 

History 101 and 102 or English 203, 204, 333 9 

140 and 141 6 Other courses: anthro- 

Mathematics 3 pology, geography, 

Other courses: political science, health allied arts, 

and safety education, sociology 9 psychology, speech 

physical education (or approved and communications 12 

substitution) or ROTC/AFROTC 2 Science (Forensic 

Science (Fundamentals Science 300, 341 ) 8 

of Science) ^ 

32 32 



BACHELOR OF ARTS CORE REQUIREMENTS 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History 101 and 102 or 140 

and 141 6 

Mathematics 3 

Other courses: political science, 

health and safety education, 

sociology) 9 

Physical Education (or 

approved substitution) or 

ROTC/AFROTC .J. 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Criminal Justice 200 3 

English 203, 204, 333 9 

Foreign Language 6 

Other courses: anthro- 
pology, geography, 
allied arts, 
psychology, or speech 

and communications 3 

Science (Forensic 

Science 300, 341) 8 

Elective .3 

32 



English/ 145 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE OR BACHELOR OF ARTS 
Corrections Emphasis 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Counseling Psychology 101, 

311, 312, 360, 361 13 

Criminal Justice 325, 330, 351, 

352, 353, 400* 15 

Sociology 240, 300 6 



34 



Counseling Psychology 

423, 433 6 

Criminal Justice 450, 

451, 452, 461 12 

Polymer Science 440 3 

Sociology 341 , 344 6 

Electives ^3 

30 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE OR BACHELOR OF ARTS 
Juvenile Justice Emphasis 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Counseling Psychology 101, 

311, 312, 360, 361 13 

Criminal Justice 325, 330, 351, 

353, 360, 361, 400* 18 

Electives in Behavioral 

Sciences 3 



34 



Counseling Psychology 

423, 433 6 

Criminal Justice 

450, 452, 460, 

461, 462 15 

Forsenic Science 440 3 

Sociology 341 , 344 ^ 

30 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE OR BACHELOR OF ARTS 
Law Enforcement Emphasis 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Criminal Justice 325, 330, 333, 

340, 341, 342, 400* 18 

Political Science 301 , 380 6 

Sociology 240, 340 6 

Electives 4 



34 



Criminal Justice 

332, 370, 430, 

470, 471 15 

Political Science 

480, 481 6 

Forensic Science 

440 3 

Sociology 341 , 444 ^> 

30 



•CJ 400 is offered only in ihe junior or senior year summer sessions, unless approved by the chairman. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Robert S. Pawlowski, Chairman 

W.H. Anderson, Ball, Barthelme, D. Berry, Breland, 

Brinegar, G. Davis, J.K. Davis, Hauer 

Herzinger, Hickman, Innes-Brown, Kay, Kolin, Lasater, J. Lewis, McCraw, 

C. Moorman, Oehms, Orange, Phillips, Polk, 

P. Prenshaw, T. Richardson, Sims, C. Scates, C. Skates, 

R. Stamper, Stringer, Tharpe, Twiss, M. Weatherford. 



146/College of Liberal Arts 



ENGLISH PROGRAMS 



The English major may earn a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree with or 
without teaching accreditation. In addition to traditional programs in literature, the 
English Department sponsors specialized programs in Linguistics, TESOL, and Creative 
Writing. For assistance in selecting the appropriate program, students should consult an 
adviser in the English Department. Students working toward any degree must include in 
their programs the required core subjects. Information on the master's and Doctor of 
Philosophy programs can be found in the Graduate Bulletin. 

The undergraduate major in English consists of a total of thirty-six (36) hours beyond 
the freshman level. At least twenty-one (21) hours must be earned at the junior and senior 
level; however, it is strongly recommended that majors take twenty-four (24) hours at that 
level. Majors desiring state certification in English should contact the English Department 
to learn the current requirements. 

Students should take some sophomore level work before enrolling in junior level 
courses and some junior work before enrolling in senior courses. Students must include 
among their advanced courses at least one in each of the following categories: (1 ) English or 
World Literature before 1700, or Linguistics; (2) English or World Literature after 1700; 
(3) American Literature. Analysis of Literature (ENG 340) is required of all English ma- 
jors. For teacher certification, students must take one advanced course in grammar and two 
in English Literature, one of which must be in Shakespeare. 

An undergraduate minor in English requires a total of twenty-four (24) hours beyond 
Freshman English, including at least nine (9) at the junior or senior level. If state certifica- 
tion is desired, the student should contact the English Department to learn the current re- 
quirements. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN ENGLISH 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 (English 

100 does not satisfy core 

requirements) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Free Elective 3 

History (101 and 102 or 140 and 

141 are recommended) 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is 

recommended) 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/ 

AFROTC (this requirement may 

also be met by participation 

in varsity athletics or asso- 
ciated activities) 2 

Science J5 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English or World Literature 

before 1700 or Linguistics 3 

English Electives 12 

English 340 Analysis of Literature 

(meets core requirement for 

a 300-level composition course) 3 

Free Electives 15 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

American Literature 3 

English (203 and 204 are 

recommended) 6 

Foreign Language (fewer hours 

may suffice, depending on 

placement) 6 

Free Elective 3 

Other courses from the following 

areas, with no more than three 

hours from any one area: 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 

anthropology, geography, 

political science, speech 

communication, sociology 12 

30 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English Electives (9 hours 

at 400 level) 12 

English or World Literature 

after 1700 3 

Free Electives 18 



TOTAL: 



English/ 147 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DECREE 
IN ENGLISH 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 101 and 102 (Eng- 
lish 100 does not sat- 
isfy core requirements) 6 

History (101 and 102 or 140 
and 141 are recommended) 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is 
recommended) 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/ 
AFROTC (this requirement 
may also be met by parti- 
cipation in varsity athle- 
tics or associated activi- 
ties) 2 

Science 12 



English (203 and 204 
are recommended) 

English Electives 

Other courses (from the 
following areas, with no 
more than three hours 
from any one area: 
Allied Arts 100 or Music 
365, anthropology, eco- 
nomics, geography, Health 
and Safety Education 101 , 
philosophy, political 
science, psychology, speech 
communication, sociology). 



29 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



American Literature 3 

English Electives 9 

English or World Literature 

before 1700 or Linguistics 3 

English 340 Analysis of 

Literature 3 

Free Electives j_5 

33 



English or World Literature 

after 1700 3 

English Electives (400 level) 9 

Free Electives 21 



TOTAL: 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
IN ENGLISH WITH CERTIFICATION* 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 (Eng- 
lish 100 does not satis- 
fy core requirements) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History (101 and 102 or 140 
and 141 are recommended) 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is 
recommended) 3 

Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC (this re- 
quirement may also be met 
by participation in varsity 
athletics or associated 
activities) 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Science (biological science) 6 



32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 

365 3 

English (203 and 204 are 
recommended) 6 

Foreign Language (fewer hours 
may suffice, depending on 
placement) 6 

Health and Safety Education 

101 3 

Other courses (from the 
following areas, with no 
more than three hours 
from any one area: anthro- 
pology, geography, political 
science, philosophy, socio- 
logy) 6 

Physical Science 6 

Speech Communication ^ 

33 



148/College of Liberal Arts 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

American Literature 3 

English Electives (400 level) 9 

English 340 Analysis of Litera- 
ture 3 

English or World Literature 
before 1700 or Lingusitics 3 

English Elective 3 

Educational Psychology 372 
Adolescent Psychology 3 

Educational Psychology 374 
Educational Psychology 3 

Research and Foundations 
Public Education in the U.S 3 



30 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum Instruction-Secondary 

454 Methods in English 3 

♦Curriculum Instruction-Secondary 

3 1 3 Principles of Teaching 

High School 3 

♦Curriculum Instruction-Secondary 

484 Student Teaching 9 

English or World Literature 

after 1700 3 

English Electives 6 

English 401 Advanced Grammar 3 

English 454 or 455 Shakespeare's 

Comedies or Tragedies 3 

Research and Foundations 469 

Tests & Measurements .J 

33 
TOTAL: 128 

♦Must be taken together 



'Beginning in 1981, English 379, Survey of Contemporary Literature, and English 406, History of the English 
Language, will be required for certification. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN ENGLISH WITH CERTIFICATION* 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 (Eng- 
lish 100 does not satisfy 
core requirements) 6 

History (101 and 102 or 
140 and 141 are re- 
commended) 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is 

recommended) 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/ 
AFROTC (this requirement 
may also be met by parti- 
cipation in varsity athle- 
tics or associated activi- 
ties) 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Science (6 hours of biological 

and 6 hours of physical) \2 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

American Literature 3 

English Electives (400 level) 9 

English 340 Analysis of Litera- 
ture 3 

English or World Literature 

before 1700 or Linguistics 3 

Educational Psychology 372 
Adolescent Psychology 3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 

365 3 

English Elective 3 

English (203 and 204 are 

recommended) 6 

Health and Safety Education 

101 3 

Other courses (from the 

following areas, with no 

more then three hours 

from any one area: 

anthropology, economics, 

geography, philosophy, 

political science, 

sociology) 12 

Speech Communication 3 

30 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

♦Curriculum Instruction— Secondary 

313 Principles of Teaching 

High School 3 

♦Curriculum Instruction— Secondary 

484 Student Teaching in 

English 9 

Curriculum Instruction— Secondary 

454 Methods in English 3 



Educational Psychology 374 
Educational Psychology 

Research and Foundations 400 
Public Education in the U.S. 

Free Electives 



Linguistics/ 149 

English Electives 6 

. 3 English 401 Advanced Grammar 3 

English 454 or 455 Shakespeare's 

. 3 Comedies or Tragedies 3 

.6 English or World Literature 

after 1700 3 

Research and Foundations 469 

Tests & Measurements »_3 

33 33 

TOTAL: 128 

•Must be taken together 



•Beginning 1981, English 379, Survey of Contemporary Literature, and English 406, History of the English 
Language, will be required for certification. 

Linguistics 

Bonnie C. Brinegar, Director 
The English Department offers a linguistics major which is interdisciplinary in nature 
and is drawn from the Departments of English, Foreign Languages, and other departments 
offering linguistically related courses. It is primarily designed as preparation for careers 
calling for proficiency in the use and/or analysis of languages: the teachings of languages 
(including English either as a first or second language), government service, businesses with 
overseas operations, and international relations. Students entering this program will be 
assigned an adviser by the director of the program. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN LINGUISTICS 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 (English 

100 does not satisfy core 

requiremens) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Free Elective 3 

History (101 and 102 or 140 

and 141 are recommended) 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is 

recommended) 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/ 

AFROTC (this requirement 

may be met by participation 

in varsity athletics or 

associated activities) 2 

Science ^6 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Electives 21 

English 340 Analysis of Literature 3 

English 400 Intro, to Linguistics 3 

English 402; Foreign Language 

412, 422, 472, or 400 3 

Foreign Language 300 or Speech 

Communication 210 .3 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Electives 6 

English (203 and 204 are 

recommended) 6 

Foreign Language (fewer hours 
may suffice, depending on 
placement) 6 

Other courses (from the following 
areas, with no more than three 
hours from any one area: 
Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, geography, 
political science, phil- 
osophy, speech communication, 
sociology) 12 



30 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Elect 6 courses for 18 hours 
from Anthropology 311, 411; 
English 401, 406, 409; Foreign 

Language 412, 422, 472 18 

Electives 12 

Speech Communication 324 3 



33 
TOTAL: 128 



1 50/College of Liberal Arts 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
IN LINGUISTICS WITH CERTIFICATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 (Eng- 
lish 100 does not satisfy 
core requirements) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History (101 and 102 or 140 
and 141 are recommended) 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is re- 
commended) 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/ 
AFROTC (this requirement 
may also be met by partici- 
pation in varsity athletics 
or associated activities) 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Science (biological) .J* 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

English (203 and 204 are 
recommended) 6 

Foreign Language (fewer hours 
may suffice depending on 
placement) 6 

Health and Safety Education 3 

Other courses (from the 
following areas: geo- 
graphy, anthropology, 
political science, phil- 
osophy, sociology) 3 

Science (physical) 6 

Speech Communication 3 



30 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Electives from Anthropology 

311, 411, English 401, 

406, 409, Foreign 

Language 412, 422, 472, 

Speech Communication 324 21 

English 402 or Foreign Language 

412, 422, 472, 400 3 

Educational Psychology 374 

Educational Psychology 3 

Educational Psychology 372 

Adolescent Psychology 3 

Research and Foundations 400 

Public Education in the U.S 3 



33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum Instruction — Secondary 

454 Methods in English 3 

""Curriculum Instruction— Secondary 

313 Principles of 

Teaching High School 3 

*Curriculum Instruction — Secondary 

484 Student Teaching 9 

English 400 Introduction to 

Linguistics 3 

English 340 Analysis of 

Literature 3 

English Electives 6 

Foreign Language 300 or 

Speech Communication 210 3 

Research and Foundations 469 

Tests and Measurements ^ 

33 
TOTAL: 128 



•Musi be taken logeiher 

To teach, a student must certify either by taking a double major or by taking a major 
in linguistics and satisfying state certification requirements in a subject area such as speech, 
English, or a foreign language. 



TESOL 

Bonnie C. Brinegar, Director 

A student who majors in English with an emphasis in Teaching English to Speakers of 

Other Languages (TESOL) will be certified to teach English to non-native speakers both in 

the United States and abroad as well as to teach English to native speakers in Mississippi. In 

addition, the requirements for foreign language certification in Mississippi are met by the 



TESOL/151 

TESOL program, provided that 2 units in the modern language elected have been earned in 
high school, or that eighteen (18) hours of that language are taken at the college level. 

By meeting either the English or foreign language major requirements, a TESOL stu- 
dent may receive NCATE certification, automatically certifying that student to teach 
English or a foreign language to English speakers in 31 states. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
IN TESOL WITH CERTIFICATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 (English 

100 does not satisfy core 

requirements) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History (101 and 102 or 140 

and 141 are recommended) 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is 

recommended) 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/ 

AFROTC (this requirement 

may also be met by partici- 
pation in varsity athletics 

or associated activities 2 

Science (6 hours biological 

and 6 hours of physical) 12 

35 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 340 Analysis of Literature 3 

English 400 Intro. Linguistics 3 

English 401 Advanced Grammar 3 

English 402 Syntax 3 

English 454 or 455 Shakespeare's 

Comedies or Tragedies 3 

English, American Literature 370, 

470, 489 3 

English Literature after 1700 3 

Educational Psychology 372 Adoles- 
cent Psychology 3 

Educational Psychology 374 Educa- 
tional Psychology 3 

Research and Foundations 

400 Public Education in U.S .J 

30 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or 

Music 365 3 

English (203 and 204 are 

recommended) 6 

Foreign Language (fewer hours 

may suffice, depending on 

placement 12 

Health and Safety Education 

101 3 

Other Course (from the 

following areas: anthropology, 

geography, political science, 

sociology) 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech Communication .3 

33 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum Instruction Secondary 

454 Methods in English 3 

"Curriculum and Instruction-Secondary 

484 Student Teaching in H.S 9 

""Curriculum and Instruction-Secondary 

313 Principles of Teaching 

High School 3 

Electives 6 

Latin 3 

Research and Foundations 469 

Tests and Measurements 3 

Speech and Hearing Sciences 201 

Phonetics 3 



TOTAL: 



30 

128 



•To be taken together 



Center for Writers 

Frederick Barthelme, Director 

The Center for Writers, functioning under the aegis of the Department of English, of- 
fers interested undergraduates the opportunity to specialize in poetry or fiction writing 
within the context of the basic English BA degree. 

A cohesive sequence of workshop courses of increasing difficulty encourages the gifted 



1 52/College of Liberal Arts 

student writer to locate and focus his or her talent, and to observe and participate in the 
process of teaching creative writing. 

A companion group of theory and literature courses places emphasis on contemporary 
and current writing, literary theory, and criticism in English and in translation. 

The Center sponsors two publications: Mississippi Review, a national journal of fic- 
tion, poetry, and criticism; and Product, a student publication geared to publish and cir- 
culate within the University community the very best student writing. 

Specialization in creative writing is available by arrangement with the Director of the 
Center for Writers. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Editha S. Neumann, Chairman 

E. Anglin, Austin, Fontecchio, R. B. Johnson, Jr., 

McCrary, R. Moorman, W. Odom, Schurfranz 

Candidates for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree may 
choose a major or minor in French, German, Spanish, or classics. The major requires a 
minimum of thirty (30) semester hours. The minor requires eighteen (18) hours. Students 
choosing to major or minor in classics must take both Greek and Latin for a total of the 
necessary hours of credit. Programs in Italian and Russian are also available, although they 
do not establish an academic major or minor. Language areas are indicated in the course 
titles. Where no single language is named, the course is open to students studying any 
foreign language, and such courses are applicable toward the degree programs in various 
language areas. 

From time to time accelerated courses are offered at the beginning and intermediate 
levels. These courses have certain advantages for the student and allow rapid acquisition of 
a foreign language. 

Students may begin programs of specialization at an early date in their foreign 
language training. In cooperation with other departments at this University, the Depart- 
ment of Foreign Languages has established a number of formal and informal programs for 
the student who wishes to prepare for a career in which bilingualism can be an advantage. 
The department offers, for example, courses that emphasize or supplement training in the 
following areas: linguistics, translation, banking, and business administration in connec- 
tion with Common Market countries, government and diplomatic service, the military, 
foreign language teaching, literature, resource management, community and regional plan- 
ning, and bilingual secretarial skills. For assistance in devising a suitable curriculum, 
students should consult as soon as possible with a foreign language adviser. Since the begin- 
ning language courses are combinations of historical, cultural, and language material, they 
can function as electives for students in liberal arts, the sciences, and education, even 
though these students are pursuing neither a major nor a minor in the department. 

Credit earned for study abroad (FL 301, FL 401) may substitute for FL 41 1, 421, 471, 
or 406 with the consent of the adviser. 

Those students who have already studied the language they wish to continue here will 
enter the curriculum at an appropriate level. For a major, they must complete the thirty (30) 
hour requirement in their language area. 

Because proficiency, and not hours of credit, is the basis for continuing study of a 
language, every course in the department has as its prerequisite the consent of the instruc- 
tor. All students are expected to take courses that will be challenging and profitable for 
them — neither too elementary nor too advanced. 

Students interested primarily in literature should include in their advanced studies a 
series of courses treating literary topics and literary history. Those emphasizing language 
arts, linguistics, or translation skills should include FL 301, 400, and 403. Prospective 
teachers should enroll in FL 404, in addition to regular language courses and the courses 
necessary to meet requirements for teacher certification. Those wishing to gain language 
skills for becoming bilingual secretaries, public relation consultants, businessmen, resource 
managers, airline stewardesses or stewards, area specialists, etc., should include advanced 
language and culture courses and FL 403. 

Any student taking a foreign language course has access to the Foreign Language 



Foreign Languages/ 1 53 

Laboratory and may be required to attend laboratory or drill sessions each week in connec- 
tion with regular classroom meetings. Required laboratory exercises and drill sessions are at 
the discretion of the instructor and may vary from week to week. 

Listed below are the common requirements for various degree programs. Electives in 
these programs may be used to establish a minor or to fulfill requirements in a second ma- 
jor. The programs leading to the BA degree are recommended for the student who plans to 
pursue graduate studies. The programs leading to the BS degree are recommended for the 
student who wishes to qualify for teacher certification at the secondary-school level with an 
undergraduate degree. These programs include: (1) an academic major in a foreign 
language, (2) a teaching minor in English, (3) the BS core requirement, College of Liberal 
Arts, (4) the General Core requirements, College of Education and Psychology, (5) the re- 
quirements of the secondary education minor. A minor in a teaching field other than 
English is also possible. The suggested sequences may be modified to meet a student's 
specific program and schedule needs. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
IN FRENCH, GERMAN, OR SPANISH 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

French: 111, 112, or 

German: 121, 122, or 

Spanish: 171, 172 
History (101 and 102 are 6 

recommended) 
Mathematics (101 or 120 is 3 

recommended) 

Science 6 

Physical Education or 2 

ROTC/AFROTC (This 

requirement may also 

be met by participation 

in varsity athletics or 

associated activities.) 

Elective or minor ._3 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 332, 333, or 334 3 

Foreign Language (301 is 9 

recommended; may sub- 
stitute for one to three 
courses in the major area) 
French: 311, 313, and 

one approved elective 
German: 321, 323, and 
one approved elective 
Spanish: 371, 373, and 
one approved elective 

Foreign Language (other than 6 

academic major, continued) 
Electives or minor L5 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (203 and 204 are 6 

recommended) 
Foreign Language 6 

French: 211, 212, or 

German: 221, 222, or 

Spanish: 271, 272 
Foreign Language (other than 6 

academic major) 
Other courses (from the 12 

following areas, with no 

more than three hours 

from any one area: 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 

365, anthropology, geography, 

political science, philosophy, 

speech communication, sociology) 

Elective or minor ^ 

33 



SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Foreign Language (401 is 9 

recommended, or the following 

options) 

French: 411 (or 406), 413, and 

one approved elective 
German: 421 (or 406), 423, and 

one approved elective 
Spanish: 47 1 (or 406), 473, and 

one approved elective 
Electives or minor 21 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



1 54/College of Liberal Arts 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE, 
TEACHING OPTION, IN FRENCH, GERMAN, OR SPANISH 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

French: 111, 112, or 

German: 121, 122, or 

Spanish: 171, 172 
History (101 and 102 are 6 

recommended) 
Mathematics (101 or 120 is 3 

recommended) 

Science 6 

Physical Education or 2 

ROTC/AFROTC (This 

requirements may also be 

met by participation in 

varsity athletics or 

associated activities.) 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (203 and 204 are 6 

recommended) 
Foreign Language 6 

French: 211, 212, or 

German: 221, 222, or 

Spanish: 271, 272 

Psychology 110 3 

Science 6 

Speech Communication 3 

Other courses (from the 9 

following areas, with no more 

than three hours from any one 

area: 

anthropology, economics, 

geography, philosophy, political 

science, sociology) 



33 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 372, 374 6 

English 332, 333, or 334, and 12 

approved electives 
Foreign Language (301 is 9 

recommended: may substitute 

for one to three courses in 

the major area) 

French: 311, 313, and 
one approved elective 

German: 321, 323, and 
one approved elective 

Spanish: 371, 373, and 
one approved elective 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

Research and Foundations 400 3 



33 



SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 3 

Foreign Language (401 and 404 9 

are recommended, or the following 

options) 

French: 411 (or 406), 413, and 

one approved elective 
German: 421 (or 406), 413, and 

one approved elective 
Spanish: 471 (or 406), 473, and 
one approved elective 

Research and Foundations 469 3 

Secondary Education: 15 

CIS 455 (3 hrs.) 

CIS 313 (3 hrs. in conjunction 

with the following) 
CIS 485 (9 hrs.) _ 

30 
TOTAL: 128* 



•The following additional professional education courses will be required in the secondary education minor for 
those students graduating after September I, 1981: 

Secondary Education 3 10 - Junior-Senior High School Reading Methods (3 sem. hrs.) 
Special Education 400 - The Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (3 

sem. hrs.) 

Secondary Education 422 - Curriculum Development for Career Education (3 sem. 

hrs.) 



Classics/ 155 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE, 
TEACHING OPTION FOR LATIN, IN CLASSICS 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Latin: 151, 152 
History (101 and 102 are 6 

recommended) 
Mathematics (101 or 120 is 3 

recommended) 

Science 6 

Physical Education or 2 

ROTC/AFROTC (This 

requirement may also be met 

by participation in varsity 

athletics or associated 

activities.) 

32 



English (203 and 204 are 9 

recommended, and approved elective) 

Foreign Language 12 

Latin: 251, 252, and 
Greek: 131, 132 

Psychology 110 3 

Science 6 

Speech Communication 3 



33 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 372, 374 6 

English 332, 333, or 334, and 6 

approved elective 
Foreign Language 403 and 6 

Latin: 353 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

Research and Foundations 400 3 

Other courses (from the 9 

following areas, with no 

more than three hours 

from any one area: 

anthropology, economics, 

geography, philosophy, 

political science, sociology 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 6 

Foreign Language 6 

404 (recommended) and 
Latin: 455 

Research and Foundations 469 3 

Secondary Education: 15 

CIS 455 (3 hrs.) 
CIS 313 (3 hrs in con- 
junction with the following) 
CIS 485 (9 hrs.) 



30 
TOTAL: 128* 



*The following additional professional education courses will be required in the secondary education minor for 
those students graduating after September I, 1981: 

Secondary Education 310 - Junior-Senior High School Reading Methods (3 sem. hrs.) 
Special Education 400 - The Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (3 

sem. hrs.) 

Secondary Education 422 - Curriculum Development for Career Education (3 sem. 

hrs.) 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
IN CLASSICS 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 101, 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Latin: 151. 152 



English (203 and 204 are 6 

recommended) 
Foreign Language 12 



1 56/College of Liberal Arts 



History (101 and 102 are 6 

recommended) 

Science 6 

Physical Education or 2 

ROTC/AFROTC (This 

requirement may also be met 

by participation in varsity 

athletics or associated 

activities.) 
Elective or minor 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 



32 



SEM. HRS. 



English 332, 333, or 334 3 

Foreign Language 18 

Latin: 353, 455, and 

Greek: 431, 432, and 

a modern foreign language: 

111 and 112, or 

141 and 142, or 

171 and 172 

Electives or minor ]2 

33 



Latin: 251, 252, and 

Greek: 131, 132 
Other courses (from the 12 

following areas, with no 

more than three hours from 

any one area: 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 

anthropology, geography, 

political science, philosophy, 

speech communication, sociology) 

Elective or minor ^3 

33 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Foreign Language (modern, in the 6 

area elected in the junior year: 

211 and 212, or 

241 and 242, or 

271 and 272 
Electives or minor 24 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



DEPARTMENT OF 
GEOGRAPHY AND AREA DEVELOPMENT 

William M. Roberts, Chairman 
Cross, A. Kelley, R. Landry, McKee, Stepko, Wales, D. L. Williams 

The Department of Geography and Area Development offers the following 
undergraduate degree programs: 

1 . Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Geography 

2. Bachelor of Science in Community and Regional Planning 

3. Bachelor of Arts in Economics 



THE GEOGRAPHY PROGRAM 

Geography is concerned with the nature, development, and significance of the spatial 
attributes of the surface and atmospheric envolope of the earth. The discipline attempts to 
explain the variable character of the earth through an examination and anlyasis of the ar- 
rangement and interrelationships of a multitude of relevant cultural and natural 
phenomena. 

As a university discipline, Geography at USM serves a multiple objective: (1) to con- 
tribute to the student's broad understanding of the world, its conditions, and its peoples; 
(2) to prepare the student who desires to teach at the secondary level with a speciality in 
geography, and, (3) to prepare students for advanced work and professional careers in 
geography in areas such as university teaching, community and regional planning, resource 
management, land-use analysis, industrial location analysis, and cartography. The depart- 
ment offers a full range of courses designed to satisfy all three of these objectives. 
Geography majors may follow either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science cur- 
riculum. 



Geography/ 157 

Undergraduate courses in Geography fall into one of the three following groups: (1) 
topical — courses in this group, such as economic geography and environmental 
climatology, consider the geographical or spatial aspects of specific categories or processes; 
(2) regional— such courses deal with certain secions of the earth (e.g., Europe) and general- 
ly afford a broader view of the forces of social, economic, physical, and political interac- 
tion, and (3) techniques — this group includes courses in aerial photograph interpretation, 
quantitative methods, cartography, computer mapping, and remote sensing that provide 
the student with the tools necessary for geographic and related careers. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

A student majoring in Geography may select one of several alternative plans. He may 
work toward the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science teaching, or the Bachelor of 
Science non-teaching degree. The student's choice of program should be determined by his 
plans for the furture and in close coordination with his adviser. All students pursing a ma- 
jor in Geography must complete the following requirements— which include a minimum of 
thirty-six (36) hours in the Department of Geography and Area Development and a minor. 

Hours 

General Core for the College of Liberal Arts 

(including Geography (GHY) 103 59 

Professional Requirements 

GHY 310, 323, 324, 331, and 350 15 

Three additional topical courses in GHY 9 

One 400-level GHY techniques course 3 

One 400-level GHY regional course 3 

Electives in GHY (may include 103) 6 

Minor Requirements 21 

Electives 12 

Total 128 

The department also offers a Bachelor of Science teaching degree with a minor in 
Secondary Education. The geography requirements for this program are similar to those 
listed for the B.S. degree in geography. The minor requirements may be found elsewhere in 
this Bulletin under Secondary Teacher Education. Prospective majors should contact an 
adviser in both Geography and Secondary Education as soon as practicable after enroll- 
ment. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN GEOGRAPHY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 (English 100 does English (203 and 204 

not satisfy core requirement) 6 are recommended) 6 

History (101 and 102 or 140 and 141 Foreign Language (fewer hours may 

are recommended) 6 suffice, depending on placement) .... 6 

Science 3 Geography 310 3 

Foreign Language 6 Other courses (from the following 

Mathematics (101 or 120 areas, with no more than 3 hours 

is recommended) 3 from any one area: Allied Arts 100 

Physical Education or ROTC/ AFROTC or Music 365 , anthropology, economics. 

(This requirement may also bemet by geography, political science, philosophy, 

participation in varsity athleticsor speech communication, sociology) .... 12 

associated activities.) 2 Twocourses from minor field 6 

Elective ._3 

32 33 



158/CoIlege of Liberal Arts 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 323 or 333 One 400-level techniques course in 



Geography 323, 324, 331, and 350 .. . 12 
Three additional topical courses in 

Geography 9 

Two courses from minor field 6 

Elective 3 



33 



Geography 3 

One 400-level regional course in 

Geography 3 

Two Geography electives 6 

Three courses from minor field 9 

Electives ^ 

30 
TOTAL: 128 



REQUIREMENTS EOR A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN GEOGRAPHY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 (English 100 does 
not satisfy core requirements) 6 

History (101 and 102 or 140 and 141 
are recommended) 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is recom- 
mended 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/AFROTC 
(this requirement may also be met 
by participation in varsity athletics 
or associated activities) 2 

Elective 3 

Science Jb 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (332 or 333 is recommended) . . 3 
Geography 323, 324, 331, and 350 .. . 12 
Three additional topical courses in 

Geography 9 

Three courses from minor field 9 



33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English (203 and 204 are recommended) . . 6 

Geography 310 3 

Other courses (from the following 
areas, with no more than 3 hours 
from any one area: Allied Arts 
100 or Music 365, anthropology, 
economics, geography, health and 
safety education 101, philosophy, 
political science, psychology, 
speech communication, sociology). ... 21 



One course from minor field 3 

33 
SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

One 400-level techniques course in 

Geography 3 

One 400-level regional course in 

Geography 3 

Two Geography electives 6 

Three courses from minor field 9 

Electives ._9_ 

30 
TOTAL: 128 



COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

A student minoring in Geography must take a minimum of twenty-one (21) hours in 
the department. Recommended for the minor are GHY 103, 310, 323, 324, 331, and either 
341 or 350, plus any 400-level regional course. 



vide: 



THE COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING PROGRAM 

Robert J. Landry, Director 
The general objectives of the Community and Regional Planning program are to pro- 

( I ) A basic core of practical training and course work in urban, transportation, and en- 
vironmental planning; 



Economics/ 159 

(2) A generalized interdisciplinary core of related training, primarily in behavioral and 
scientific knowledge, and in technical skills; 

(3) A base upon which students can build a program of graduate study in community 
and regional planning, natural resources planning, or the social and environmental 
professions; and 

(4) A general but systematic background for students who intend to assume positions 
in planning and planning-related professions without further formal study. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 (English lOOdoes 

not satisfy core requirements) 6 

History (101 and 102 or 140and 141 

are recommended) 6 

Mathematics (101 is recommended) 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/AFROTC 
(This requirement may also bemet 
by participation in varsityathletics 

or associated activities.) 2 

Science \1 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English (203 or 300is recommended) 3 

Geography310,360,and361 9 

Other Courses (Sociology 101, Economics 
255, Political Science 101, Anthropo- 
logy 101 or212,Geography350,and 
Health and Safety Education 101 are 
recommended) 18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



30 
SEM. HRS. 



English (332 or 333 is recommended) .. 3 
Geography (411, 461, and 463 are 

required) 9 

Other courses (seven courses should be 
selected from: Journalism 421; 
Economics 422, 424, 480; Sociology 
240, 310; Political Science 301, 402, 
470; Environmental Science 403, 405; 
Recreation 432, 434, 436; Real 
Estate 330, 460; Geography 323, 324, 
370, 422, 451, 453, 460, 472, 474, 
475) 21 



33 



English (332 or 333 is recommended) .. 3 
Geography (413, 415, 462, 464, 465, 

466, 469, and 491*are required) .... 24 
Electives 6 



TOTAL: 



33 
128 



*The iniernship will generally be taken during ihe 
summer between the junior and senior year. 



ECONOMICS PROGRAM 

William M. Roberts, Coordinator 
The Bachelor of Arts major in Economics is coordinated by the Department of 
Geography and Area Development. This degree is granted by the College of Liberal Arts 
while the Bachelor of Science program in Economics is the responsibility of the College of 
Business Administration. 



160/College of Liberal Arts 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN ECONOMICS 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 (English 

100 does not satisfy core 

requirements) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History (101 and 102 or 140 

and 141 are recommended) 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is 

recommended) 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/ 

AFROTC(This requirement 

mayalsobemetby 

participation in varisty 

athletics or associated 

activities) 2 

Science 6 

Elective .J 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Economics 301, 302, and 330 

9 

English 332 or 333 3 

Two electives in Economics 6 

Minor 9 

Electives ^ 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Economics 255 and 256 6 

English (203 and 204 

are recommended) 6 

Foreign Language (fewer 

hours may suffice, 

depending on placement) 6 

Other courses (from the 

following areas, with 

nomorethan3 hours 

from any one area: 

Allied Arts lOOor Music 

365, anthropology, economics, 

geography, political science, 

philosophy, speech communication, 

sociology) 12 

Minor ^3 

33 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Economics 340 and 345 6 

Elective in Economics 3 

Minor 9 

Electives 12 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

The recommended minor in Economics consists of ECO 155, 256, 301, 310, 330, 340 
and 345. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

John Ray Skates, Chairman 

J. Anglin, Bodenhamer, R. Bowers, Carriere, Cicarelli, Conklin, W. Edwards, 

Fike, Gonzales, Guice, Harper, McCarty, McMillen, 

Scarborough, Schmidt, Wallace 

The Department of History participates in programs leading to the degrees of the 

Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, the Master of Arts, the Master of Science, the 

Master of Philosophy, and the Doctor of Philosophy. For the master's and doctoral 

degrees, please consult the Graduate Bulletin. The department participates and advises in 

the Social Studies, American Studies, and Latin American Studies interdisciplinary degree 

programs. 



COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN HISTORY 

An undergraduate student majoring in History may elect either the Bachelor of Arts or 
the Bachelor of Science degree program. He may certify to teach in the field of social 
studies at the secondary level under either of the above degree plans by taking the necessary 
education and psychology courses. He should consult with his adviser to determine which 



History/161 

degree plan to follow and what education and psychology courses are required. 

Students majoring in History must take thirty-six (36) hours which, regardless of his 
degree plan, must include History (HIS) 101, 102, and HIS 140, 141. Of the twenty-four 
(24) remaining hours required for the major, no more than twelve (12) hours of advanced 
course work can be selected from any one of the three following course areas: (1) American 
History, (2) European History, (3) Other (Latin American, Far East, and other non- 
American, non-European courses). Students who have satisfied the thirty-six (36) hour ma- 
jor requirement may take additional advanced courses in history in any area they prefer. 



COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN HISTORY 

The student minoring in History should take twenty-one (21) hours in history which 
should include HIS 101 and 102. 

Teacher Certification 

The history major working toward the Bachelor of Science teaching degree with a 
secondary school license in social studies must include in his program (1) the education 
courses required for the Class A teaching certificate (education will normally be the minor 
for a history major seeking a teacher's license); and (2) the following social studies courses 
either as core or electives: economics (6 hours), political science (6 hours), geography (6 
hours), sociology (3 hours), Mississippi History (3 hours). 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN HISTORY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 
(English 100 does not satisfy 

core requirements.) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History 101 and 102 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 are 

recommended.) 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science 6 



29 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 332, 333, or 334 3 

Advanced History Electives 12 

Minor Electives 9 

Minors vary from 18 to 

27 hours.) 

General Electives 9 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (203 and 204 are 

recommended.) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

(fewer hours may suffice 

depending on placement.) 

History 140 and 141 6 

Other courses (from the 

following areas with no more 

than 3 hours from any one area) 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 

anthropology, geography, 

political science, philosophy, 

speech communication, 

sociology L2 

30 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Advanced History Electives 12 

Advanced Minor Electives 12 

General Electives 12 



TOTAL 



36 

128 



162/College of Liberal Arts 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN HISTORY (Non-Teaching) 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, economics, 
geography, Health and Safety 
Education 101, philosophy, political 
science, psychology, speech 
communication, sociology, (no 
more than 3 hours from any area... 9 

English 101 and 102 6 

History 101 and 102 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 

recommended) 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science ._6 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, economics, 
geography, health and safety 
education, philosophy, political 
science, psychology, speech 
communication, sociology, (no 
more than 3 hours from any area, 
and may not duplicate those 
areas taken in freshman year) 12 

English (203 and 204 

recommended) 6 

History 140 and 141 6 

Science ^6 

30 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (332, 333, or 334 

recommended) 3 

History Electives 12 

Minor Electives 9 

General Electives .9 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

History Electives 12 

Minor Electives 12 

General Electives 9 



TOTAL: 



33 
128 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN HISTORY 
WITH SECONDARY CERTIFICATION IN SOCIAL STUDIES 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

English 101 and 102 6 

History 101 and 102 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 are 

recommended.) 3 

Physical Education 2 

Physical Science 6 

Political Science 101 3 

Sociology 101 ^3 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biological Science 6 

Economics 255, 256 6 

English 203 and 204 6 

Geography 103 3 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

History 140 and 141 6 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 



36 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 372 3 

Educational Psychology 374 3 

English 332, 333, or 334 3 

History 341 3 

History Electives 12 

Political Science 301 3 

Research and Foundations 400 ^ 

30 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Research and Foundations 469 3 

Secondary Education 458 3 

Secondary Education 488 9 

Secondary Education 313 3 

Geography Electives 3 

History Electives 9 

30 
TOTAL: 128 



American Studies/ 163 

AMERICAN STUDIES MAJOR (AMS— 204) 

John D. W. Guice, Director 

The American Studies Program offers an interdisciplinary major and minor for 
students interested in a broad liberal arts education. Through courses from many fields, the 
student acquires an understanding of the development of the American heritage. By course 
selection and during the American Studies Seminar, students may pursue their special in- 
terests. The major requires thirty (30) semester hours and the minor requires eighteen (18) 
semester hours. For students who desire a double major, no minor is required. 

Students are encouraged to have a second major or minor in complementary, career- 
oriented fields such as prelaw, pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, paralegal studies, journalism, 
library science, marketing, management, radio-television-film, military science, and educa- 
tion. The requirements listed below are in addition to the Liberal Arts core curriculum for 
either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree. Students in this program will 
be advised by the director of the American Studies Program. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN AMERICAN STUDIES (Non-Teaching) 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 101 and 102 6 

(English 100 does not 

satisfy core requirement) 

Foreign Language 6 

History 140 and 141 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 

is recommended.) 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science 6 



29 



American Studies Electives 6 

English (203 and 204 are 

recommended.) 6 

Foreign Language (Fewer hours 
may suffice depending on 
placement.) 6 

Other courses (from the following 
areas with no more than 3 hours 
from any one area; American 
Studies options in these fields 
may apply.) Allied Arts 100 or 
Music 365, anthropology, geography, 
political science, philosophy, speech 

communication, sociology \2 

30 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Advanced American Studies 

Electives 9 

English 332, 333, or 334 3 

General Electives 12 

Minor Electives (Minors 

vary from 18 to 27 

hours. Because of the 

interdisciplinary nature 

of American Studies, a 

minor is not required. 

However, a strong minor 

or double major is 

recommended.) ,_9 

33 



SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Advanced American Studies 

Electives 12 

Advanced Minor Electives 12 

(Minors vary from 18 to 27 
hours. Because of the inter- 
disciplinary nature of American 
Studies, a minor is not required. 
However, a strong minor or 
double major is recommended.) 

American Studies Seminar 3 

General Electives 9 



36 
TOTAL: 128 



164/College of Liberal Arts 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN AMERICAN STUDIES (Non-Teaching) 



FRESHMAN YEAR SKM . HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, economics, 
geography, Health and Safety 
Education 101, philosophy, 
political science, psychology, 
speech communication, sociology, 
(no more than 3 hours from any 
area; American Studies options 
in these fields may apply.) 9 

English 101 and 102 6 

(English 100 does not satisfy 
core requirements.) 

History 140 and 141 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is 
recommended.) 3 

Science 6 

Physical Education ._2 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

American Studies Electives 12 

English (332, 333, or 334 
recommended.) 3 

General Electives 9 

Minor Electives (Minors vary 
from 18 to 27 hours. Because 
of the interdisciplinary nature 
of American Studies, a minor is 
not required. However, a strong 
minor or double major is recom- 
mended.) ._9 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, economics, 
geography, Health and Safety 
Education 101, philosophy, 
political science, psychology, 
speech communication, sociology, 
(no more than 3 hours from any 
area; no duplication of areas taken 
in freshman year; American 

Studies options may apply.) 12 

American Studies Electives 6 

English 203 and 204 recommended.) .. .6 
Science 6 



30 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

American Studies Electives 12 

American Studies Seminar 3 

General Electives 9 

Minor Electives (Minors vary from 
18 to 27 hours. Because of the 
interdisciplinary nature of 
American Studies, a minor is not 
required. However, a strong 
minor or double major is recom- 
mended.) 9 



33 
TOTAL: 128 



LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 



Orazio Ciccarelli, Director 



The Latin American Studies Program offers: (A) an interdisciplinary major in Latin 
American Studies; (B) an interdisciplinary minor in Latin American Studies. The program 
is designed to prepare students for careers in government, business, teaching, or private 
organizations having Latin American interests. The requirements listed below are in addi- 
tion to the General College Core curriculum for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor 
of Science degree. Students pursuing this program will be advised by the director of the 
Latin American Studies Program. 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 6 

Foreign Lauguage 171 and 

172 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104 

and 105 6 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology, geography, allied 

arts, sociology, or speech 

communication 3 

English 203, 204, and 333 9 

Foreign Language 271 and 272 6 



Social Studies/ 165 



History 101 and 102 6 

Mathematics 1 20 3 

Philosophy 151 3 

Political Science 101 .3 

33 



Physical Education 2 

General Electives 12 



32 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology 315 3 

Foreign Language 371 and 471 6 

Geography 403 3 

History 380 and 381 6 

Political Science 434 or 456 3 

General Electives 6 

Major Electives ^6 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

History 382, 480, and 481 6 

Major Electives 15 

General Electives 9 



TOTAL: 



30 

128 



Emphasis on Latin American Trade and Finance 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 101 and 102 6 

Foreign Language 171 and 172 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104 

and 105 6 

History 101 and 102 6 

Mathematics 120 3 

Philosophy 151 3 

Political Science 101 3 



33 



Accounting 201 and 202 6 

Anthropology, geography, 

allied arts, sociology, 

or speech communication 3 

Economics 255 and 256 6 

English 203 and 204 6 

Foreign Language 271 and 272 6 

Marketing 300 3 

Physical Education /I 

32 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Economics 330 3 

Economics 340 or 345 3 

English 333 3 

Finance 389 3 

Foreign Language 471 3 

History 380 and 381 6 

Management 360 3 

General Electives ._9 

33 



Economics 435 or 

Marketing 495 3 

Finance 472 or 480 3 

History 480, 481 , or 482 3 

Political Science 434 or 456 3 

Major Electives 6 

General Electives 12 



TOTAL: 



30 

128 



SOCIAL STUDIES 

J. Ray Skates, Director 
The interdisciplinary major and minor in the area of Social Studies is jointly sponsored 
by the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Education and Psychology. This program 
is open to both prospective teachers as well as those students desiring a broad preparation 
in the social sciences. Consequently a student majoring in Social Studies may elect the 
degree program of either college. Students who plan to teach in the public schools must 
meet the professional certification requirements of the College of Education and 
Psychology. It is recommended that a student who is planning to teach the Social Studies in 
junior or senior high school take this interdisciplinary major as it more adequately prepares 
one to teach all the social studies courses currently offered in the public school. 



166/College of Liberal Arts 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN SOCIAL STUDIES 
WITH SECONDARY CERTIFICATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

English 101 and 102 6 

History 101 and 102 6 

Mathematics (101 or 120 

recommended) 3 

Physical Education 2 

Physical Science 6 

Political Science 101 3 

Sociology 101 .3 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 372 3 

Educational Psychology 374 3 

English 332, 333, or 334 3 

History 341 3 

History Elective 3 

Political Science 301 3 

Research and Foundations 400 3 

General Elective 3 

Geography Elective 3 

Sociology Elective ^3 

30 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biological Science 6 

Economics 255, 256 6 

English 203 and 204 6 

Geography 103 3 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

History 140 and 141 6 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

36 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Research and Foundations 469 3 

Secondary Education 458 3 

Secondary Education 488 9 

Secondary Education 313 3 

Geography Elective 3 

History Elective 3 

Political Science Elective 3 

Sociology Elective 3 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN SOCIAL STUDIES 

(Non-teaching) 

The minor in Social Studies will consist of twenty-one (21 ) hours in no less than four of 
the six fields specified above, and a minimum of twelve hours in courses numbered 200 or 
above. The designated fields are history, political science, sociology, economics, 
geography, and anthropology. 



DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM 

Birthney Ardoin, Chairman 

Bishop, Frair, Wheeler, Wiggins 

The Department of Journalism offers emphases in News-Editorial, Photojournalism, 
Public Relations, and Journalism Education. The department also participates in an inter- 
disciplinary Advertising Program. These programs are designed to prepare students for 
careers in news reporting, editing, writing, photography, advertising, public relations, and 
journalism education. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN JOURNALISM 

Listed below are the common requirements for both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 
of Science degrees. The suggested sequence may be modified to meet a student's specific 
program and schedule needs. 



Journalism/167 

Typing Skills Necessary 

Any student expecting to take courses in journalism should understand that a typing 
capability is essential. Those students with no typing skills should plan to take typing very 
early in the program. 

All majors and minors in the News-Editorial sequence are required to do practical 
work on The Student Printz. Others are invited to participate in the publication of the 
paper. 

Flexibility in the selection of courses outside of the department is encouraged so that 
students can formulate individual career goals. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN JOURNALISM 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 

(English 100 does not 

satisfy core requirements) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History (101 and 102 

or 140 and 141 are recommended) ..6 

Journalism 3 

Mathematics (101 or 120 

is recommended 3 

Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC (this require- 
ment may also be met 

by participation in varsity 

athletics or associated activities 2 

Science ._6 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (203 and 204 

are recommended) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

(Fewer hours may suffice, 

depending on placement 

Journalism 103, 140, 140L 7 

Open Elective 3 

Other courses (from the 

following areas, with no more 

than three hours from any one area: 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 

anthropology, geography, philosophy, 

political science, speech 

communication, sociology) 12 



34 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 
(English 100 does not 
satisfy core requirements 6 

History (101 and 102 
or 140 and 141 are recom- 
mended) 6 

Journalism 3 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is 
recommended) 3 

Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC (this require- 
ment may also be met by 
participation in varsity 
athletics or associated 
activities) 2 

Science \1 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English (203 and 204 

are recommended 6 

Journalism 103, 140, 140L 7 

Other courses (from the 

following areas, with no more 
than three hours from any one area: 
Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, economics, geography, 
Health and Safety Education 101 , 
philosophy, political science, 
psychology, speech communication, 
sociology) 21 

Teacher certification requires 
Fine Arts, Health and Safety 
Education 101, Psychology 110, 
and Speech Communication 1 1 1 



34 



168/College of Liberal Arts 

Requirements for an Emphasis in Journalism Education 

The journalism education program is designed to prepare students academically and 
professionally to teach journalism and supervise publications on the secondary level and to 
pursue graduate level study. The journalism major working toward the Bachelor of Science 
teaching degree must meet general and professional education requirements, including a 
minor in secondary education, in addition to meeting departmental requirements. 

Majors must complete thirty-three (33) semester hours in journalism, including JOU 
102, 103, 140, 311, 313, 331, and 402. The candidate should also meet the special re- 
quirements of a minor in a related subject matter field, such as English or social science. 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Secondary 313 3 

Educational Psychology 372, 374 6 

English 350 or 351, 

370 or 371 6 

Journalism 300, 311, 

313,331,402 15 

Research and Foundations 300 ^3 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Secondary 465, 494 12 

English 401 , 454, or 455 6 

Journalism Electives 12 

Research and Foundations 469 3 



33 



Requirements for an Emphasis in News-Editorial 

The news-editorial sequence requires a minimum of thirty-three (33) semester hours of 
journalism, including JOU 102, 103, 140, 311, 313, 402, 403, 450, and 460. (JOU 300 is 
counted above minimum 33 hours.) 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (above 300 level) 3 

Journalism 300, 311,313 

elective 15 

Minor Area 12 

Open Elective /$ 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Journalism 402, 403, 450, 460 12 

Minor Area 9 

Open Elective 8 



29 



Requirements for an Emphasis in Photojournalism 

The photojournalism program requires a minimum of thirty-three (33) semester hours 
of journalism, including JOU 102, 103, 140, 240, 341, 342, 344, 440, and 460. (JOU 300 is 
counted above minimum 33 hours.) 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (above 300 level) 3 

Journalism 240, 341 , 342, 344 12 

Minor Area 12 

Open Electives J> 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Journalism 440, 460 electives 12 

Minor Area 9 

Open Electives 8 



29 



Requirements for an Emphasis in Public Relations 

The sequence in public relations requires the following thirty-three (33) semester hours 
of journalism, JOU 102, 103, 140, 301, 31 1, 312, 313, 421 , 422, 425, and 428. Recommend- 
ed for electives or as a possible minor are these optional courses to provide students with a 
broad range of instruction in other areas of communication. Speech Communication 311, 
315; Radio, Television, and Film 271, 302. 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Journalism 301, 31 1, 312, 313 12 

Minor Area 9 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 271, 302 6 

Speech Communication 311,315 ^ 

33 



Advertising/ 169 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (above 300 level) 3 

Journalism 421, 422, 425, 428 12 

Minor Area 12 

Open Elective 2 

29 



ADVERTISING 

Birthney Ardoin, Director 

The Departments of Journalism and Radio, Television, and Film offer a major in 
Advertising in conjunction with the Department of Marketing in the College of Business 
Administration. 

The advertising major is interdisciplinary and is designed to prepare students to work 
in advertising agencies, business, and industries that require advertising departments, or as 
specialists in the mass media. 

Advertising majors in Liberal Arts may follow either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor 
of Science curriculum dependent upon specialized interests. A curriculum plan should be 
developed with the major adviser early in the program. 

Advertising majors do not have a seperate minor. Majors must complete fifty-four 
(54) semester hours. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ADVERTISING 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 

(English 100 does not satisfy 

core requirements) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History (101 and 102 or 

140 and 141 are recommended) 6 

Journalism 140, 140L 4 

Mathematics (101 or 120 

is recommended) 3 

Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC (this require- 
ment may also be met 

by participation in varsity 

athletics or associated activities) 2 

Science ^6 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (203 and 204 are 

recommended) 6 

Foreign Language (Fewer 

hours may suffice depending 

on placement) 6 

Journalism 240 3 

Other courses (from the following 

areas, with no more than 

three hours from any one area: 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 

anthropology, geography, philosophy, 

political science, speech 

communication, sociology) 12 

Radio, Television, and Film 271 3 



30 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (above 300 level) 3 

Journalism 312,331 6 

Marketing 300, 322, 330, 355 12 

Open Electives 6 

Radio, Television, and 
Film 330, 340 ^ 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Electives in Major 6 

Journalism 421 3 

Marketing 342, 365, 455 9 

Open Electives 11 

Radio, Television, and Film 43 1 3 



TOTAL: 



32 
128 



1 70/College of Liberal Arts 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 (English 

100 does not satisfy core 

requirements) 6 

History (101 and 102 or 

140 and 141 are recommended) 6 

Journalism 140, 140L 4 

Mathematics (101 or 120 is 

recommended) 3 

Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC (this require- 
ment may also be met 

by participation in varsity 

athletics or associated 

activities 2 

Science L2 

33 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Journalism 312, 331 6 

Marketing 300, 322, 330, 355 12 

Open Electives 9 

Radio, Television, and 
Film 330, 340 6 



33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English (203 and 204 are 

recommended) 6 

Journalism 240 3 

Other courses (from the following 
areas, with no more than 
three hours from any one area: 
Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, economics, geography, 
Health and Safety Education 101, 
philosophy, political science, 
psychology, speech communica- 
tion, sociology) 21 

Radio, Television, and Film 271 3 



33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Electives in Major 6 

English (above 300 level) 3 

Journalism 421 3 

Marketing 342, 365, 455 9 

Open Electives 8 

Radio, Television, and Film 43 1 .J 

32 
TOTAL: 131 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 

Ambrose A. Szalwinski, Chairman 

Allenbach, Barnett, Bligh, Carlton, Cascio, Hino, 

Housley, Lane, Reed, Ritter, Rozar, Sanford, 

Shoemaker, Stewart, White, Yancy 

AUTHORIZATION 

The University of Southern Mississippi was authorized by the Department of the Army 
to activate a unit of the Senior Division Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) on April 
3, 1950. The unit was organized June 14, 1950, under the authority of an Act of Congress, 
June 3, 1916, and subsequent amendments thereto. 

MISSION 

The mission of the ROTC program is to attract, motivate, and prepare selected univer- 
sity students for commissioning as officers in the United States Army. Academic achieve- 
ment in the major field of study is of primary importance for students enrolled in the 
ROTC program. 



PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION 

The ROTC program of instruction is divided into two courses, the Basic Course and 
the Advanced Course. The full program encompasses four years. 



ROTC Scholarship/171 

The Basic Course consists of two years of instruction and is a prerequisite for entry in- 
to the Advanced Course. The Basic Course is introductory in nature and no military obliga- 
tion is incurred. 

The Advanced Course is designed to prepare selected cadets for commissioning in the 
United States Army. All academic majors are accepted, and the University has waived the 
requirement for a minor for those students completing the ROTC program. Successful 
completion of a six-week advanced summer camp and nomination by the Professor of 
Military Science are required for commissioning. The Advanced Course student is paid a 
$100.00 per month tax free subsistence allowance during both academic years of the Ad- 
vanced Course. Regular Army and Reserve Commissions are earned. A recipient of a 
Reserve Commission may opt for a short period of active duty and then join a Reserve or 
National Guard unit. 

Basic Course students will participate in a leadership practicum. This will include prac- 
tical training exercises on the USM campus and the Camp Shelby traning site. 

Advance Course students will be required to attend a weekly leadership laboratory and 
participate each semester in practical training exercises. 

TWO-YEAR PROGRAM 

A two-year program leading to a commission is available to the following categories of 
students: 

(1) A veteran whose military record is evaluated by the Professor of Military Science 
and determined to have the necessary background for acceptance into the Advanced 
Course. 

(2) Students who did not take the Basic Course during the freshman and sophomore 
years. These students must successfully complete a six-week Basic Summer Camp prior to 
applying for the Advanced Course. 

(3) Students who attend a condensed summer program on the USM campus and par- 
ticipate in two practical training exercises conducted at Camp Shelby, Mississippi. 



EXTRACURRICULAR AND ENRICHMENT ACTIVITIES 

ROTC cadets have the opportunity to participate in several professional organizations 
within the Corps of Cadets. These include the Orienteering Team, the Ranger Company, 
the Rappelling Club, the Rifle Team, the Scabbard & Blade (honorary military society), 
and the Southern Generals (drill team). 

ROTC SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

The Army ROTC Scholarship Program is designed to offer financial assistance to 
outstanding young men and women in the four-year ROTC program who are interested in 
the Army as a career. There are four types of scholarships: Four-year, Three-year, Two- 
year, and One-year. Each scholarship provides tuition, textbooks, and laboratory fees in 
addition to paying a $100.00 subsistence allowance per month for the period that the 
scholarship is in effect. 

Four-year scholarships are offered to select young men and women who have 
graduated from high school or received equivalent credit from an acceptable state or na- 
tional agency. Applicants must be enrolled in or acceptable for enrollment in the Universi- 
ty. Students desiring to apply for the Four-year Scholarship must do so between April 1 and 
November 15 of the year before the scholarship is to begin. Information and application 
packets for the Four-year Scholarship may be obtained from the high school counselor or 
by writing to: 

Army ROTC 

P.O.Box 12703 

Philadelphia, PA 19134 

The Department of the Army will select all four-year scholarship recipients. 

Three-year scholarships are available to students who have completed their first year 
of Army ROTC. Two-year scholarships are available to students who have completed the 
Basic Course of Military Science and have been accepted for enrollment in the Advanced 



172/College of Liberal Arts 

Course. One-year scholarships are available to Advanced Course students who have com- 
pleted their third year of Army ROTC. 

Students desiring to apply for the One-year, Two-year, or Three-year scholarships will 
do so through the Professor of Military Science at the University. Applicants will be screen- 
ed by a scholarship committee and selections will be forwarded to the Department of the 
Army for final selection. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 
AND RELIGION 

Paul W. Sharkey, Chairman 
Burr, DeArmey, Sullivan, F. Wood 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion offers programs of study leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science with a major in Philosophy, a major in 
Philosophy and Religion, a minor in Philosophy or a minor in Philosophy and Religion. In 
general, each of these programs is designed to help students gain a better understanding of 
themselves, their world, their own beliefs and those of others. 

The major in Philosophy offers both breadth and depth in philosophical training for 
students interested in pursuing graduate study in philosophy as well as for those majoring 
in philosophy as a pre-professional program in law, medicine, or other related fields. 

The Philosophy and Religion major offers and encourages breadth in the 
philosophical and scholarly study of the phenomenon of religion for students interested in 
pursuing the academic study of religion at the graduate level, or as a pre-professional pro- 
gram for the ministry, religious education, or counseling. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PHILOSOPHY 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 , 102 6 Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

Foreign Language 6 English 203 and 204 or 301 6 

History 101 , 102 6 Foreign Language 6 

Math 3 General Elective 3 

Philosophy 151 3 Geography or Political Science 3 

Philosophy 253 3 Philosophy 310 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/AFROTC .2 Philosophy 312 3 

Speech Communication 111 .3 Science ^6 

32 33 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology or Sociology 3 General Electives 12 

English 334 3 Minor 9 

General Electives 9 Philosophy Electives 9 

Minor 9 

Philosophy 356 3 

Philosophy Electives JS 

33 30 

TOTAL: 128 



Philosophy and Religion/ 173 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 101, 102 6 

Geography or Speech Communication 1113 



History 101, 102 

Math 

Philosophy 151 

Philosophy 253 

Physical Education or ROTC/AFROTC 



Science 6 



32 



Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

Anthropology or Sociology 3 

Economics or Political Science 3 

English 203 and 204 or 301 6 

General Elective 3 

Philosophy 310 3 

Philosophy 312 3 

Psychology or Health and Safety 

Education 101 3 

Science ^6 

33 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 334 3 

General Electives 6 

Minor 9 

Philosophy 356 3 

Philosophy Electives 6 

Social Science Elective 6 



General Electives 12 

Minor 9 

Philosophy Electives 9 



33 30 

TOTAL: 128 

Students wishing to minor in Philosophy (PHI) are required to complete eighteen (18) 

semester hours in philosophy including PHI 151, 253, 356, and at least one course in the 

history of philosophy. The remaining six (6) semester hours are to be selected from upper 

division offerings in philosophy in consultation with a departmental adviser. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History 101, 102 6 

Math 3 

Philosophy 1 5 1 or Religion 131 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/AFROTC . 2 

Religion 333 3 

Speech Communication 111 ._} 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology or Sociology 3 

English 334 3 

General Electives 9 

Minor 9 

Philosophy 352 3 

Philosophy or Religion Electives J5 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

English 203 and 204 6 

Foreign Language 6 

General Electives 3 

Geography or Political Science 3 

Philosophy 372 3 

Religion 335 3 

Science .3 

33 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

General Electives 9 

Minor 9 

Philosophy or Religion Electives 12 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



1 74/College of Liberal Arts 

Bachelor of Science Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 



English 101, 102 6 Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

Geography or Speech Communication 1113 Anthropology or Sociology 3 

History 101 , 102 6 Economics or Political Science 3 

Math 3 English 203 and 204 6 

Philosophy 151 or Religion 131 3 General Electives 3 

Physical Education or ROTC/AFROTC . 2 Philosophy 372 3 

Religion 333 3 Psychology or Health and Safety 

Science 6 Education 101 3 

Religion 335 3 

Science ^ 

32 33 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 334 3 General Electives 12 

General Electives 6 Minor 9 

Minor 9 Philosophy or Religion Electives 9 

Philosophy 352 3 

Philosophy or Religion Electives 6 

Social Science Electives .J3 

33 30 

TOTAL: 128 

Students wishing to minor in Philosophy and Religion are required to complete eigh- 
teen (18) semester hours in philosophy and religion including either PHI 151 or REL 131 
and PHI 372 and at least one course in the Eastern and one course in the Western religious 
traditions. The remaining six (6) semester hours are to be selected in consultation with a 
departmental adviser. 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

William H. Hatcher, Chairman 
Caudill, Gjestland, Lea, Marquardt, Parker, 
Van Wingen, Waltman, Wheat, Wolfe 
The Department of Political Science offers majors and minors in Political Science and 
Paralegal Studies, and an emphasis in Pre-Law Studies. 

A MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The Political Science major is designed to prepare students for careers in national, 
state, and local governments, teaching and international service, among others. The depart- 
ment offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, 
Master of Science, Master of Philosophy, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

In addition to PS 101 (American Government), the Political Science major must take 
at least one course from five of the six fields of Political Science. The remaining twelve 
hours are electives in Political Science. See below. 

The Six Fields of Political Science 

Political Theory: 320, 420, 42 1 , 425. 

American Government and Politics: 301, 302, 303, 401, 402, 404, 406, 407, 408, 

409. 

International Relations: 330, 33 1 , 43 1 , 432, 434, 435. 

Comparative Government: 35 1 , 450, 45 1 , 452, 453, 455, 456, 458. 

Public Administration: 370, 375, 471 , 472, 473, 474. 

Public Law: 380, 381 , 382, 383, 389, 480, 481 , 482, 484, 485, 489. 



Political Science/ 175 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The department recommends that the minor (18 hours) include courses from at least 
four of the six fields. 

Teacher Certification 

Political Science majors who wish to secure certification to teach in the secondary 
schools can do so by taking the appropriate education and social science courses. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History 101 and 102 or 140 

and 141 6 

Mathematics 3 

Political Science 101 3 

Science 6 

Social Science and Humanities 
(Allied Arts 100, or Music 365, 
anthropology, geography, 
Philosophy, speech communi- 
cation, or sociology.) ^3 

33 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (300 level) 3 

Political Science 9" 

Minor 9 

Electives L2 

33 



S OPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Physical Education or ROTC/ 

AFROTC 2 

Political Science 220 3 

Political Science (300 level) 3* 

Social Science and Humanities 
(Allied Arts 100, or Music 365, 
anthropology, geography, 
philosophy, speech communi- 
cation, or sociology.) 9 

Elective .3 

32 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Political Science 12" 

Minor 9 

Electives 9 

30 
TOTAL: 128 



•Political Science majors must lake al least one course from five of the six fields of the discipline. The re- 
mainder of the Political Science courses are electives. See above. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

History 101 and 102 or 140 

and 141 6 

Mathematics 3 

Political Science 101 3 

Science 6 

Social Science and Humanities 
(Allied Arts 100 or Music 
365, anthropology, economics, 
geography, health and safety 
education, philosophy, 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 6 

Physical Education or ROTC/ 

AFROTC 2 

Political Science 220 3 

Political Science (300 level) V 

Science 6 

Social Science and Humanities 

(Allied Arts 100 or Music 

365, anthropology, economics, 

geography, health and safety 

education, philosophy, 



176/College of Liberal Arts 



political science, psychology, 
sociology or speech communi- 
cation.) 



political science, psychology, 
sociology, or speech communi- 

.9 cation.) J_2 

33 32 



JUMOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (300 level or above) 3 

Political Science 9" 

Minor 9 

Electives \2 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Political Science 12" 

Minor 9 

Electives 9 



TOTAL: 



30 

128 



'Political Science majors must take at least one course from five of the six fields of the discipline. The re- 
mainder of the Political Science courses are electives. See above. 

PARALEGAL STUDIES 

Ronald G. Marquardt, Director 

The Paralegal field is a new profession designed to aid attorneys to deliver legal ser- 
vices more efficiently. Legal assistants are currently being hired for positions in business, 
private law firms, and government. 

A major in Paralegal Studies requires that a student complete the College of Liberal 
Arts Core requirements for a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree plus a minor. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
IN PARALEGAL STUDIES 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History 101 and 102 or 

History 140 and 141 6 

Mathematics 3 

Science 6 

Social Science and Humanities 
(Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, geography, philosophy, 
speech communication, political 
science, or sociology) 6 



33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 201 3 

English 6 

Foreign Language 6 

General Business Administration 295 ... 3 
Physical Education or ROTC/AFROTC2 

Political Science 381 3 

Political Science 383 3 

Social Science and Humanities 
(Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, geography, philosophy, 
speech communication, political 

science, or sociology) ._6 

32 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Criminal Justice 330 and 430 6 

English 333 3 

Management 360 3 

Minor 9 

Political Science 380 3 

Political Science 389 3 

Real Estate and Insurance 340 3 

Elective ._$ 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Business Education 460 or 

Management 364 or 454 3 

Political Science 480 or 489 3 

Political Science 481 3 

Minor 9 

Electives 12 



TOTAL. 



30 

28 



Paralegal Studies/ 177 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN PARALEGAL STUDIES 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

History 101 and 102 or 
History 140 and 141 6 

Mathematics 3 

Science 6 

Social Science and Humanities 
(Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, economics, geography, 
health and safety education, 
philosophy, political science, 
psychology, sociology, or speech 

communication) \1 

33 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Criminal Justice 330 and 430 6 

English 333 3 

Political Science 380 3 

Political Science 383 3 

Political Science 389 3 

Management 360 3 

Real Estate and Insurance 340 3 

Minor ,_9 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 201 3 

English 6 

General Business Administration 295 ... 3 
Physical Education or ROTC/AFROTC2 

Political Science 381 3 

Social Science and Humanities 
(Allied Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, economics, geography, 
health and safety education, 
philosophy, political science, 
psychology, sociology, or speech 

communication) .9 

32 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Business Education 460 or 

Management 364 or 454 3 

Political Science 480 or 489 3 

Political Science 481 3 

Electives 12 

Minor 9 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



Requirements for an Emphasis in Pre-Law 

Ronald G. Marquardt and James Wolfe, Advisers 

The requirements for admission to law schools vary slightly, and a pre-law student 
should obtain the entrance requirements from the school of his choice. In general, law 
schools expect a student to possess a bachelor's degree with a major in a content field. 

All law schools require their students to be able to express themselves well in written 
composition. Therefore, a student who is weak in composition should take extra composi- 
tion courses. 

When a student first arrives, he should go to a pre-law adviser each time he registers, 
but when he selects a major, he should get an adviser from that department and thereafter 
see the pre-law adviser only regarding special problems. 

After consultation with law school administrators and practicing attorneys, it is 
recommended that students add these courses as electives in meeting their curriculum re- 
quirements. The following is a suggested course sequence. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Accounting 201 3 

Economics 255 3 



English 300 3 

Political Science 380 or General 

Business Administration 295 

or Criminal Justice 330 3 



1 78/College of Liberal Arts 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Political Science 383 3 Political Science 480 or 489 3 

English 333 3 Political Science 301 , 407 or 481 or 

Philosophy 453 3 



DEPARTMENT OF RADIO, TELEVISION, 
AND FILM 

James L. Hall, Chairman 
Albers, R.B. Cade, D. Goff, Mott 

The Department of Radio, Television, and Film offers a student an opportunity to 
study for a career in Broadcast Journalism, Broadcast Management and Sales, Radio- 
Television Production, and Film. The department also participates in an interdisciplinary 
advertising program. The Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees are offered 
in these areas of concentration. 

Federal Communications Commission regulations require that certain employees of 
radio and television stations must be licensed by the Commission. There are three classes of 
licenses: Third Class Radiotelephone License; Second Class Radiotelephone License; and 
First Class Radiotelephone License. To obtain a license, the applicant must appear before 
the Commission and pass a written examination. Students preparing for the Third Class 
License examination should enroll in RTF 311, Radio Production. Students seeking the Se- 
cond and First Class licenses should select the Interdisciplinary Minor Program listed 
below. 

The Internship Program provides the student with supervised study and experience in 
one of the mass media: radio, television, or film. Selected students are given the opportuni- 
ty to observe and to analyze the methods, techniques, and creative processes of profes- 
sionals. The scope of the internship may be highly specialized, one in which the student re- 
mains with one departmental operation, or it may be varied, in which case the student 
ranges throughout the professional organization and learns about the functions of several 
jobs. The student must originate, and submit in writing, a proposal or description of his in- 
ternship. The prospectus, signed by both a representative of professional management and 
the Radio, Television, and Film faculty member involved, serves as a contractual agree- 
ment and reminder for the student as to the nature of the internship. Students employed by 
a station or film production company on a part-time basis during the academic year cannot 
receive academic credit for work they are already doing for pay. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN RADIO, TELEVISION, AND FILM 

The major in Radio, Television, and Film consists of a minimum of thirty-six (36) 
semester hours of course work. An overall 2.0 grade point average, and a 2.5 grade point 
average in radio, television, and film courses, is required for graduation. A grade of C or 
better must be earned in all sequential courses. For example, in the Television Production 
sequence (RTF 340, 440, 447), a student must earn at least a C in RTF 340 before advancing 
to RTF 440; a C in RTF 440 before advancing to RTF 447. The Radio Production sequence 
is RTF 311 , 41 1 and Film Production includes RTF 271 , 371 , 375, 377, 471 , 477. 

All Radio, Television, and Film majors are required to take the following courses: 

Hours 

General Core for the College of Liberal Arts 60 

Departmental Requirements 

RTF 200, 27 1 , 3 11 , 340 12 

Emphasis Area in RTF 24 

Additional departmental course work should be considered by each student in con- 
sultation with his adviser with an intended goal of the fullest possible career preparation. 



Radio, Television, and Film/ 179 
REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN RADIO, TELEVISION, AND FILM 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 101, 102 6 

(English 100 does not 

satisfy core requirements) 

Foreign Language 6 

History 140, 141 6 

Other Liberal Arts 

Core Requirements 6 

Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC (this 2 

requirement may also 

be met by partici- 
pation in varsity 

athletics or 

associated activities) 
Radio, Television, and 

Film 200, 271 ^6 

32 



English 203, 204 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Other Liberal Arts 

Core Requirements 9 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 31 1,340 6 



33 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 101, 102 6 

(English 100 does not 

satisfy core requirements) 

History 140, 141 6 

Other Liberal Arts 

Core Requirements 6 

Physical Education or 2 

ROTC/AFROTC (this requirement may 

also be met by participation 

invarsityathleticsor 

associated activities) 

Radio, Television, and Film 200, 27 1 6 

Science ^ 

32 



English 203, 204 6 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Other Liberal Arts 

Core Requirement* 9 

Radio, Television and 

Film 3 1 1 , 340 6 

Science 6 



30 



Requirements for an Emphasis in Broadcast Journalism 

All students desiring an emphasis in Broadcast Journalism should complete the follow- 
ing requirements in addition to those listed in the section above entitled REQUIREMENTS 
FOR A MAJOR IN RADIO, TELEVISION, AND FILM. 



Minor Requirements 

Students preparing for careers in Broadcast Journalism should seek a minor in jour- 
nalism or photojournalism. 



1 80/College of Liberal Arts 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 
SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 332 or 333 3 

Journalism 102 3 

Minor Area 9 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 302, 320, 371, 440 12 

Electives ^6 

33 



Minor Area 9 

Other Liberal Arts 

Core Requirements 3 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 472, 360, 460, 418 12 

Electives ^6 

30 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Bachelor of Science Degree 
SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 332 or 333 3 

Journalism 102 3 

Minor Area 9 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 302, 320, 371,440 12 

Electives ^ 

33 



Minor Area 9 

Other Liberal Arts 

Core Requirements 3 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 472, 360, 460, 418 12 

Electives ._& 

30 



Requirements for an Emphasis in Broadcast Management and Sales 

All students desiring an emphasis in Broadcast Management and Sales should com- 
plete the following requirements in addition to those listed in the section above entitled RE- 
QUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN RADIO, TELEVISION, AND FILM. 



Minor Requirements 

Depending on specific career goals, students should seek a minor in business ad- 
ministration, finance, management, marketing, or accounting. 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 
SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 332, 333 or 334 3 

Minor Area 9 

Radio, Television, and Film 

330,360,407,416 12 

Electives ^ 

30 



Minor Area 9 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 425, 431, 460, 302 or 418 12 

Electives 12 



33 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Bachelor of Science Degree 
SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 332, 333 or 334 3 

Minor Area 9 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 330, 360, 407,416 12 

Electives ^6 

30 



Minor Area 9 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 425, 431, 460, 302 or 418 12 

Electives 12 



33 



Radio, Television, and Film/181 

Requirements for an Emphasis in Radio-Television Production 

All students desiring an emphasis in Radio-Television Production should complete the 
following requirements in addition to those listed in the section above entitled RE- 
QUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN RADIO, TELEVISION, AND FILM. The curriculum 
in Radio-Television Production is designed to prepare students for careers in radio stations 
and in advertising agencies. Students are required to have 120 clock hours of "on the air" 
broadcasting experience at WMSU. 

Minor Requirements 

Depending on the student's career plans, he should seek a minor in theatre, music, or 
art, or the interdisciplinary minor. 

Interdisciplinary Minor Program for FCC Advanced Licenses 

The Interdisciplinary Minor Program is designed to meet the needs of students pursu- 
ing Federal Communications Commission radiotelephone license examinations: 

Hours 

Mathematics 103, 276 6 

Industrial and Vocational Education 301 , 302, 303 9 

Physics 327, 328, 444 9 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 332 or 333 3 Minor Area 9 

Minor Area 9 Radio, Television, and 

Radio, Television, and Film 447, 460, 442 9 

Film 320, 330, 360, 41 1 12 Electives 15 

Electives .9 

33 33 

Bachelor of Science Degree 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 332 or 333 3 Minor Area 9 

Minor Area 9 Radio, Television, and 

Radio, Television, and Film 447, 460, 442 9 

Film 320, 330, 360, 41 1 12 Electives 15 

Electives ^9 

33 33 

Requirements for a Minor in Radio, Television, and Film 

All students pursuing a minor in Radio, Television, and Film must complete eighteen 
( 1 8) semester hours of RTF courses. Courses required to meet this standard are as follows: 

Hours 

Radio, Television, and Film 200, 27 1 , 3 1 1 , 340 12 

Radio, Television, and Film Electives 6 

18 

Requirements for an Emphasis in Film 

All students desiring an emphasis in Film should complete the following requirements 
in addition to those listed in the section above entitled REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR 
IN RADIO, TELEVISION, AND FILM. The curriculum in Film is designed to prepare 



182/College of Liberal Arts 

students for positions with television stations, film units, motio picture production com- 
panies, industrial in-house film units, and federal and state agencies. 



Minor Requirements 

Depending on the student's career plans he should seek a minor in English, theatre, 
art, sociology, or journalism. With concurrence of his adviser, a student may elect an inter- 
disciplinary minor by completing six courses in English, business administration, theatre, 
art, sociology, or journalism. 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 321 or 332 3 

Minor Area 9 

Other Liberal Arts 

Core Requirements 3 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 371, 270 or 370, 377 and 

an RTF Elective 12 

Electives .6 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Minor Area 9 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 375, 471, 472, 418 

or 492 12 

Electives 12 



33 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 321 or 332 3 

Minor Area 9 

Other Liberal Arts 

Core Requirements 6 

Radio, Television, and 

Film 371, 270 or 370, 377 and 

an RTF Elective 12 

Electives ,3 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Minor Area 9 

Radio, Television, and 
Film 375,471,472,418 

or 492 12 

Electives 12 



33 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 
AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

John N. Burrus, Chairman 
Bourgeois, Edwards, Heisler, Himelstein, Panko 
Ramke, Sever, Thagard, Williamson, Winn 
A suggested selection of courses is listed for each year. These include required and elec- 
tive courses for majors in sociology, undergraduate social work emphasis, and an- 
thropology. The sequence of many courses can be modified with the approval of the 
academic adviser. Many courses have prerequisites. Always check catalog descriptions to 
determine this. Certain courses are regularly scheduled for fall semester or spring semester. 
Students should note this and plan schedules to include the needed courses; this is especially 
true if one's schedule anticipates the completion of academic work in December or August. 
Students will need to schedule 15 to 18 hours (5 or 6 courses) per semester in order to 
graduate in a regular eight-term (4 year) schedule. Transfer students should schedule any 
needed core courses as early as possible after entering. 



Sociology/ 183 

MAJOR IM SOCIOLOGY 

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers a major and minor in 
sociology. A minimum of twenty-seven (27) semester hours (beyond SOC 101) is required 
for the major. Twenty-one (21) hours are needed for the minor. The sociology major may 
chose one of two emphases: (1) general sociology or (2) social work. 

Core curricula of the University, the College of Liberal Arts, and for the Bachelor of 
Science or Bachelor of Arts degree programs should be followed with care. Sociology ma- 
jors who wish to certify to teach on the secondary education level should take note of the 
requirements outlined below. It should be noted that a student may certify to teach even 
though enrolled in the College of Liberal Arts. 

Sociology majors will complete a minor of twenty-one (21) hours in another field of 
their choice. Courses not needed to fulfill major, minor, or core requirements are free elec- 
tives and may be taken in any department of the University. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 101 is a prerequisite to all other course offerings. 

Requirements for the General Sociology Major 

Hours 

Theory (Choice of two: SOC 450, 471 , 480, 481 , or 482) 6 

Methods (SOC 460 and 462) 6 

Demography (SOC 461) 3 

Social Organization (Choice of two: SOC 300, 3 10, 3 1 1 or 3 14) 6 

Sociology Electives 6 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Core Electives 3 Core Electives 9 

English 101 , 102 6 Electives 3 

Foreign Language 6 English 203, 204 6 

History 6 Foreign Language 6 

Mathematics 101 orl20 3 Science 6 

Physical Education 2 Sociology 6 

Sociology .3 

29 36 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Electives 6 Electives 12 

English 332 or 334 3 Minor 9 

Minor 12 Sociology 461 3 

Sociology Sociology 462 3 

Electives 3 Sociology 481 or 482 3 

Methods 460 3 

Organization 300, 310, 311, 
or314 3 

Theory 450, 47 1 , or 480 J 

33 30 

TOTAL: 128 



1 84/College of Liberal Arts 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Core Electives 3 

English 101, 102 6 

History 101, 102 or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 101 , 120 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science 6 

Sociology 101 ._3 

29 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Core Electives 15 

Elective 3 

English 203, 204 6 

Science 6 

Sociology Elective 3 

Sociology 3 

(300, 3 10, 3 1 1 , or 3 14) J 

36 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Core Elective 3 

English 3 

Minor 12 

Sociology 

Electives 6 

Research Methods 460 3 

Social Organization 
300, 310, 311, or 314 3 

Theory 450, 47 1 , or 480 ^3 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Core Electives 12 

Minor 9 

Sociology 

461 3 

462 3 

481 or 482 3 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY WITH SOCIAL WORK EMPHASIS 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology 101 or 212 3 

Core Elective 3 

English 101, 102 6 

History 6 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science 104, 105 or 

Laboratory Science 6 

Sociology 101 ._3 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Core Subjects 9 

English 300 or 301 3 

Foreign Language 6 

Minor 6 

Sociology 

330 3 

331 3 

480, 481, or 482 J 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Core Elective 3 

English 203, 204 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Minor 6 

Psychology 110 3 

Sociology 230, 240 6 

Sociology 3 10 or 3 1 1 3 



33 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Electives 6 

Minor 9 

Sociology 

460 3 

433 9 

480,481,482 3 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



Sociology/ 185 
Bachelor of Science Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Core Subjects 6 Core (4 Courses) 12 

English 101 , 102 6 English 203, 204 6 

History 101, 102 or 140, 141 6 Science 6 

Mathematics 100 or 120 3 Sociology 

Physical Education 2 230 3 

Science 6 240 3 

Sociology 101 J 310or 311 J 

32 33 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Core 3 Electives 6 

Electives 6 Minor 9 

English 332, 333, or 334 3 Sociology 

Minor 12 460 3 

Sociology 330, 331 6 433 9 

480, 48 1 , or 482 J 480, 48 1 , or482 J 

33 30 

TOTAL: 128 



GENERAL SOCIOLOGY MAJOR 

With Fulfillment of Requirements 

for Certification in Secondary Education 

The general sociology major who elects secondary education as a minor must satisfy all 
requirements of the University and Liberal Arts cores. In addition, such a student must 
take the following courses in the major and minor. 
I. MAJOR: SOCIOLOGY (SOC) (27 semester hours or 9 courses above and in addi- 
tion to the introductory course). 
AREA Hours 

Theory: SOC 450, 47 1 , 480, 48 1 , 482 6 

Methods: SOC 460, 462 6 

Demography: SOC 461 3 

Social Organization: SOC 300, 310, 311,314 6 

Sociological Electives: 6 

Any of the above not taken for a requirement and 
in addition, SOC 240, 340, 341 , 350, 355, 421 , 
424, 426, 444. 
II. MINOR: SECONDARY EDUCATION (27 semester hours) 

REF 400, EPY 372, EPY 374, REF 469, CIS 458, CIS 3 13, CIS 488 (9 hours). After 
September I, 1981, the following professional education courses must be added to 
those listed above to meet the new requirements: 
CIS 3 10- Junior-Senior High School Reading Methods (3 sem. hrs.) 
SPE 400 - The Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (3 sem. hrs.) 
CIS 422 - Curriculum Development for Career Education (3 sem. hrs.) 

Additional courses needed for state certification: World History (6 hours), 
American History (6 hours), Mississippi History (3 hours), Economics (6 hours). 
Political Science (6 hours), Geography (6 hours), Sociology (3 hours), plus 6 hours 
Social Studies electives other than Religion, Psychology, or Philosophy. 



186/College of Liberal Arts 

MAJOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

A major in Anthropology (ANT) will require a minimum of thirty (30) hours in an- 
thropology, including ANT 101 or 212, and three of the following courses: ANT 201 , 204, 
311, and SOC 460. 

Anthropology majors will complete a minor of twenty-one (21) hours in another field 
of their choice. 

For majors in other disciplines desiring to minor in anthropology, a minimum of 
twenty-one (21) semester hours including ANT 101 or 212 and 413. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology 101 or 212 3 

Core Elective 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History 6 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Physical Education .!_ 

29 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology 201 , 204, 

212,or311 6 

Core Electives 9 

Elective 3 

English 203, 204 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Science ^6 

36 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology 201 , 204, or 3 1 1 6< 

Elective in Anthropology 3 

Electives (Core Completion) 12 

English 332, 333, or 334 3 

Minor 9 

•Sociology 460 may be substituted 
for 3 hours 

33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology 6 

Electives in Anthropology 6 

Electives 6 

Minor 12 



TOTAL: 



30 

128 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology 101 or 212 3 

Core Elective 3 

English 101, 102 6 

History 101, 102, or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 101 , 120 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science ^ 

29 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology 312, 3 13, 314, or 

315 3* 

Anthropology 305, 310, 401 

or 316 as per Advisement 6 

English 332, 333, or 334 3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology 201 , 204, or 3 1 1 6 

Electives in Anthropology 3 

Electives (Core) 15 

English 203, 204 6 

Science 6 



36 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology 403, 404, 415 or 

304, 310, or 401 6 

Anthropology Elective 3 

Archeology or Cultural 

Anthropology 3 



Speech and Hearing Sciences/ 1 87 

Minor 12 Electives 9 

Remaining Core 6 Minor 12 

'Sociology 460 may be substituted 

30 33 

TOTAL: 128 

The required and recommended courses vary among the three fields (Cultural An- 
thropology, Physical Anthropology, and Archeology). After the student has made his 
choice among these he should work closely with an anthropology adviser to schedule the re- 
quired courses and to choose among the anthropology electives. 

A. MINOR IN ASIAN STUDIES 

M. Winn, Director 
An emphasis in Asian Studies leads to an interdisciplinary minor within the Depart- 
ments of Sociology and Anthropology, Foreign Languages, Geography and Area Develop- 
ment, History, Philosophy and Religion, and Political Science. The program is primarily 
designed for students who seek preparation for positions with the United National 
Organization or with the United States Government in this or a foreign country, for careers 
in business and private organizations having overseas interests, for teaching, and for 
research projects in archaeology, anthropology, and other fields undertaken in cooperation 
with a university or museum. 

Requirements for Minor 

A minor in Asian Studies requires a total of eighteen (18) semester hours to be selected 
from no less than three of the following academic areas. (All courses listed below carry 
three hours of credit.) 

ANT 314, 316,411,492 HIS 301 

FL 400 (May be repeated up to a total of PHI 352, 492 
6 hours for Japanese, Sanskrit, or PS 453 

any other Oriental Language.) REL 435 

GHY407 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCES 

Robert C. Thomas, Chairman 
Adams, DuBard, Lehrer, McClelland, Rhodes, Scanio, Schaub 

Pre-Professional Program in Speech/Language 

Pathology and Audiology 

This undergraduate curriculum is designed to provide a foundation for meeting the 
Mississippi State Department of Education certification requirements in speech and hear- 
ing. Beginning September 1, 1981, the minimum certification level for Speech-Language 
Clinicians and School Audiologists will be Class AA, which requires a master's degree. 
Therefore, it must be understood that the undergraduate portion of this training, described 
below, will not lead to eligibility for certification by the Mississippi State Department of 
Education. Eligibility for certification will be achieved upon completion of the master's 
degree in Speech/Language Pathology or Audiology. See the Graduate Bulletin for in- 
formation relating to admission requirements for graduate study. Students considering 
public school employment in states other than Mississippi are urged to become familiar 
with the certification requirements in those states. 

Undergraduate Program in Education of the Deaf 

Bachelor of Arts teaching degrees and Bachelor of Science teaching degrees are offered 



188/College of Liberal Arts 

by the department. Students wishing to meet the Class A certification requirements of the 
Mississippi State Office of Education in the area Hearing Impaired may do so by following 
the degree plans described in this section under Education of the Deaf. 

The Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences is concerned with the body of 
knowledge and scientific study that pertains to both normal and abnormal speech, hearing, 
and language. The department provides the environment in which information in this area 
can be advanced effectively and knowledge can be disseminated. 

A Speech and Hearing Clinic, a School for Children with Language Disorders, and a 
School for Children with Impaired Hearing are administered by the Department of Speech 
and Hearing Sciences to provide remedial services, educational and training experience for 
students, and settings for clinical research. An Acoustics Laboratory is operated by the 
department for the purpose of conducting pure and applied research dealing with speech 
and auditory processes. In addition, the department has working agreements with several 
off-campus clinical facilities around the state for clinical practicum experience. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR PRE-PROFESSIONAL BACHELOR OF 

ARTS DEGREE PROGRAM IN SPEECH/LANGUAGE 

PATHOLOGY OR AUDIOLOGY 



F RESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History 101 and 102 or 140 and 141 ..6 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Physical Education (or substitute) 2 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 101 1 

Science 3 



33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 300 and 203 or 204 6 

Foreign Language (fewer hours 

may suffice depending upon 

placement) 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 201 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 202 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 211 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 221 3 

Other courses (from the following 

areas, with no more than three 

hours from any one area: Allied 

Arts 110, Music 365, anthropology, 

geography, political science, 

philosophy, sociology) ._9_ 

33 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 332, 333, or 334 3 

Research & Foundations 400 3 

Special Education 310 1 

Special Education 400 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 401 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 402 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 403 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 411 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 419 3 

Electives ._9 

34 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 370 or 

372 and 374 6 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 412 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 414 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 421 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 431 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 432 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 433 or 

438 3 

Electives .6 

30 
TOTAL: 130 



Speech and Hearing Sciences/ 189 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF ARTS 
DEGREE IN EDUCATION OF THE DEAF 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100, or Music 365 3 

English 101 & 102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History 101 & 102 or 140 & 141 6 

Mathematics 101 or 210 3 

Physical Science (FS 104 & 105 ac- 
ceptable) 6 

Psychology 110 3 

Physical Education (or substitute) 2 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 101 1 



36 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Counseling Psychology 422 3 

Educational Psychology 370 or 372 3 

English 332 or 334 3 

Research & Foundations 416 3 

Special Education 310 1 

Special Education 400 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 401 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 421 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 422 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 424 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 425 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 427 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 433 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 492 .3 

40 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biological Sciences (FS 106 and 

FS 107 acceptable) 6 

English 300 & 203 or 204 6 

Foreign Language (fewer hours may 
suffice, depending upon place- 
ment) 6 

Health & Safety Education 101 3 

Other courses (from the following 
areas, with no more than three 
from any one area: anthropology, 
geography, political science, 

sociology) 6 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Research & Foundations 400 ._3 

36 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 374 3 

Research & Foundations 469 3 

Special Education 311 5-7 

Special Education 486 6-9 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 435 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 436 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 437 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 438 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 439 3 



TOTAL: 



32-37 
144-149 



REQUIREMENTS FOR PRE-PROFESSIONAL BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
DECREE PROGRAM SPEECH/LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY OR AUDIOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 & 102 6 

History 101 & 102 or 140 & 141 6 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Other courses (from the following 
areas, with no more than three 
hours from any one area: Allied 
Arts 100 or Music 365, anthro- 
pology, economics, geography) 6 

Physical Education (or substitute) 2 

Science 9 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 101 1 



33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 300 & 203 or 204 6 

Other courses (from the following 
areas, with no more than three 
hours from any one area: Health 
and Safety Education 101, philo- 
sophy, political science, soci- 
ology) 9 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 201 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 202 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 211 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 221 J| 

33 



190/College of Liberal Arts 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 332, 333, or 334 3 

Research & Foundations 400 3 

Special Education 310 1 

Special Education 400 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 401 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 402 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 403 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 411 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 419 3 

Electives ,_9 

34 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 370 or 

372 and 374 6 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 412 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 414 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 421 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 431 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 432 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 433 or 

438 3 

Electives ^ 

30 
TOTAL: 130 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
IN EDUCATION OF THE DEAF 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

English 101 & 102 6 

Health & Safety Education 101 3 

History 101 & 102 or 140 & 141 6 

Mathematics 101 or 210 3 

Physical Education (or substitute) 2 

Physical Science (FS 104 & 105 

acceptable) 6 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 101 1 



33 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 370 or 372 .... 3 

English 300 3 

Research & Foundations 416 3 

Special Education 310 1 

Special Education 400 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 401 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 421 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 422 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 424 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 425 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 433 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 492 .3 

37 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biological Science (FS 106 & 

107 acceptable 6 

English 203 & 204 6 

Other courses (from the following 
areas, with no more than three 
hours from any one area: anthro- 
pology, economics, geography, 
philosophy, political science, 

sociology) 9 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Research & Foundations 400 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 221 ._3 

30 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Counseling Psychology 400 3 

Educational Psychology 374 3 

Research & Foundations 469 3 

Special Education 311 5-7 

Special Education 486 6-9 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 427 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 435 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 436 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 437 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 438 3 

Speech & Hearing Sciences 439 3 



TOTAL: 



38-43 
38-143 



Speech Communication/ 191 

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

Richard L. Conville, Chairman 

Byrd, Chatham, L. Goff, Gwin, Lehrer 

Shands, Tardy, Tucker 

The Department of Speech Communication offers the Bachelor of Arts and the 
Bachelor of Science degrees. Speech Communication majors planning to teach in high 
school should choose the Speech Communication Education emphasis. These options are 
explained in detail below. 

The course schedules presented below are intended to aid in planning programs of 
study here at the University. While students may not take the designated courses at the 
designated times, nevertheless the course schedules provides a clear picture of what is ex- 
pected in the various majors. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

The Speech Communication major may be used to achieve four different goals: (1) it is 
a general preparation for person-oriented careers; (2) it provides a good foundation for 
graduate school; (3) it is a discipline that may be taught in high school; and (4) it is an ap- 
propriate major for the student who wants a general, liberal education. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 






FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

(English 100 does not 

satisfy core requirements) 

Foreign Language 6 

History 101 , 102, or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC (This 2 

requirement may also be 

met by participation in 

varsity athletics or 

associated activities.) 

Science 6 

Speech Communication 100 and 210 . . . . ^6 

35 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 332 or 333 3 

Speech Communication 305, 311 6 

Speech Communication 320 or 312 .... 3 

Speech Communication elective 3 

Elective 3 

Minor Requirements ]2 

30 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 203, 204 6 

Foreign Language (fewer 6 

hours may suffice depending on 

placement) 
Other courses (from the 12 

following areas, with no 

more than three hours from 

any one area: Allied Arts 100 

or Music 365, anthropology, 

geography, political science, 

philosophy, sociology) 

Speech Communication 111, 112 6 

Elective 3 



33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Speech Communication 330, 410, 

417, 450 12 

Speech Communication electives 6 

Elective 3 

Minor Requirements 9 



TOTAL: 



30 
28 



192/College of Liberal Arts 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION 
Bachelor of Science Degree 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



English 101 and 102 6 

(English 100 does not 

satisfy core require- 
ments) 
History (101 and 102 or 6 

140 and 141 are 

recommended) 
Mathematics (101 or 120 is 3 

recommended) 
Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC (This 3 

requirement may also be 

met by participation in 

varsity athletics or 

associated activities.) 

Science 12 

Speech Communication 100, 210 jS 

35 



English (203 and 204 are 

recommended) 

Other courses (from the 

following areas, with no 
more than three hours 
from any one area: Allied 
Arts 100 or Music 365, 
anthropology, economics, 
geography, Health and Safety 
Education 101, philosophy, 
political science, psychology, 
sociology) 

Speech Communication 1 1 1 and 1 12 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



33 
SEM. HRS. 



English 332 or 333 is 

recommended 

Speech Communication 305, 311 6 

Speech Communication 320 or 312 3 

Speech Communication elective 3 

Elective 3 

Minor Requirements \1 

30 



Speech Communication 330, 410, 

417, 450 12 

Speech Communication electives 6 

Elective 3 

Minor Requirements 9 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 
Requirements for an Emphasis in Speech Communication Education 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS . 

English 101 and 102 6 

(English 100 does not 
satisfy core require- 
ments) 

Fundamentals of Science 12 

Foreign Languages 6 

History 101 , 102 or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 101, 120 3 

Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC 2 

(This requirement may 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

English (203 and 204 6 

are recommended) 
Foreign Languages 6 

(fewer hours may suffice, 

depending on placement) 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Social Science 6 

Elect two courses from the 

following disciplines (no more 



Speech Communication/ 193 



also be met by 
participation in varsity 
athletics or associated 
activities.) 



35 



than 3 hours from any one): 
anthropology, economics, 
geography, philosophy, political 
science, sociology, religion (non- 
teaching majors only) 

Speech Communication 111 ,_3 

30 



JUNIOR YEAR* SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum and 

Instruction 310 3 

Educational Psychology 374 3 

Educational Psychology 370 or 

372 3 

English 332 or 333 is 3 

History of Mass Media 3 

(Journalism or Radio, 

Television, and Film) 
Radio, Television, and Film 311 3 

or 340 

Speech Communication 315, 305 6 

Theatre Arts 320 3 

Electives 6 

(Speech Communication, 

Journalism, Radio, 

Television, and Film or 

Theatre) 

33 



SENIOR YEAR* SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

313,459,496 12 

Speech Communication 1 12 or 330 3 

Speech Communication 41 1 or Radio, 

Television, and Film 416 3 

Theatre Arts 111, 300 6 

Electives 6 

(Speech Communication, Journalism, 

Radio, Television, and Film, or 

Theatre) 



TOTAL: 



33 

128 



'Beginning September I, 1981, nine hours will be added to the professional education requirements. See your adviser for 
details. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

Bachelor of Science Degree 
Requirements for an Emphasis in Speech Communication Education 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 and 102 6 

(English 100 does not 

satisfy core requirements) 
Fundamentals of Science 104, 105, 

106, 107 12 

History(101andl02or 

I40andl41) 

Mathematics 101 or 120 3 

Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC 2 

(This requirement may 

also be met by 

participation in varsity 

athletics or associated 

activities.) 

29 



S OPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 or Music 365 3 

English (203 and 204 are 6 

recommended) 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Social Science 6 

Elect two courses from the 
following disciplines (no more 
than 3 hours from anyone): 
anthropology, economics, 
geography, philosophy, political 
science, sociology, religion (non- 
teaching majors only) 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Electives ,_9 

33 



194/ColIege of Liberal Arts 



JUNIOR YEAR' 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR* 



SEM.HRS. 



Curriculum and 

Instruction 310 3 

Educational Psychology 374 3 

Educational Psychology 370or 

372 3 

English332or333is 3 

recommended 
History of Mass Media 3 

(Journalism or Radio, 

Television, and Film) 
Radio, Television, and Film 311 3 

or340 

Speech Communication 315, 305 6 

TheatreArts320 3 

Electives 6 

(Speech Communication, 

Journalism, Radio, 

Television, and Film or 

Theatre) _ 

33 



Curriculum and Instruction 

313,459,496 12 

Speech Communication 1 12 or 330 3 

Speech Communication41 1 or Radio, 

Television, and Film 416 3 

Theatre Arts 1 1 1 , 300 6 

Electives 9 

(Speech Communication, Journalism, 

Radio, Television, and Film , or Theatre) 



33 



'Beginning September 1, 1981, nine hours will be added to the professional education requirements. See your adviser for 
details. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

All students pursuing a minor in Speech Communication must complete eighteen (18) 
semester hours of Speech Communication courses. Courses required to meet this standard 
areas follows: 

Hours 



Speech Communication 305, 330, 410, 450 12 

Speech Communication (choose two courses) 3 12, 320, 350 ._6 

18 



SCHOOL OF LIBRARY SERVICE 
ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 



Department Major Emphasis Degree 4 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

LIBRARY SCIENCE* BA,BS 

Non-Teaching (BS) 
Non-Teaching (BA) 
K-12 Certification (BS) 
K-12 Certification (BA) 



'Minor Available 

'Degree Abbreviations: (BA) Bachelor of Arls, (BS) Bachelor of Science 



SCHOOL OF LIBRARY SERVICE 

Onva K. Boshears, Jr., Dean 

P.G. Anderson, L.B. Bowers, Boyd, L.F. Lanmon, Laughlin, Long, 

Mika, K. Miller, R.P. Thomas, W. Tracy, Walt, Wilder 

PURPOSE 

The primary purpose of the School of Library Service is to educate students for careers 
in librarianship and related fields. With the current emphasis on all media formats, the cur- 
riculum is planned to prepare future librarians to organize, develop, facilitate, and evaluate 
a multiplicity of print and non-print resources in varying types of libraries. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

Any student who satisfies admission requirements to the University through the Office 
of Admissions is eligible for admission to the School of Library Service. Admission to the 
School, however, does not constitute admission to a major program within the School. All 
students majoring within the School must have their major program approved by the Dean 
of the School of Library Service and a completed program plan on file in the Dean's Office. 

In the first two years in the University, the Library Science major is expected to acquire 
a broad background of general education in the liberal arts and sciences. Library science 
courses for the undergraduate major or minor are begun in the junior year and completed 
in the senior year. In addition, library science majors are advised to concentrate elective 
hours in one subject field, professional area, or langauge in order to qualify for better 
library positions. Upon completion of a four-year program, a students receives a BA or BS 
degree with a major in Library Science. After an additional year of graduate study, one can 
receive the Master of Library Science (MLS) degree. In order to qualify for many profes- 
sional positions in the library field, a master's degree is required. Consult the Graduate 
Bulletin for information on the graduate program in library service. 

Students desiring to prepare for positions in public, college, and special library fields 
should follow either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science non-teaching degree 
program. Those planning on entering these fields of librarianship should be advised that 
they will most probably be required to continue their studies at the master's level in order to 
obtain a professional level position. Students desiring to become public elementary or 



196/School of Library Service 

secondary school librarian-media specialists should follow the applicable Bachelor of 
Science teaching degree program. 

The student's choice of a degree program should be determined by his or her career 
goals, certification requirements, and in consultation with a faculty adviser or the Dean of 
the School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE SCHOOL OF 

LIBRARY SERVICE 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

History 101 and 102 or 140 and 141 ..6 

Mathematics 3 

Science (biological science, 6 hours, 

and physical science, 6 hours)* 12 

*The Fundamentals of Science Series 
satisfies this requirement. 
Social Science Elective (one course 
selected from: anthropology, 
economics, geography, political 
science, or sociology) 3 



30 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (two courses 200 level 

or above) 6 

Fine Arts (AA 100) 3 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

Library Science 201 3 

Physical Education Activity 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Social Science Electives 6 

(two courses selected from: 

anthropology, economics, 

geography, political science, or 

sociology) 

Speech Communication 111 3 

University Forum A 

30 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREES IN LIBRARY SCIENCE 

The Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees are offered in Library 
Science. Students in the Bachelor of Arts program must complete twelve (12) credit hours in 
a foreign language. Those students who have completed two (2) years of the same language 
in high school and who make satisfactory placement test scores may meet the language re- 
quirement by completing six (6) semester hours in the same language at the 200 level or 
above. The Bachelor of Science degree does not have a language requirement. Both bac- 
calaureate degrees may also be used to satisfy the requirements for certification as a school 
library media specialist. Certification as a school library media specialist in the State of 
Mississippi requires a library science major of thirty (30) hours. Students from other states 
should consult with their respective state agencies regarding certification requirements. A 
non-certification major in library science requires twenty-five (25) credit hours. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN LIBRARY SCIENCE 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

History 101 and 102 or 140 and 141 ..6 

Mathematics 3 

Science (biological science, 6 hours 

and physical science, 6 hours)* 12 

*The Fundamentals of Science Series 
satisfies this requirement. 
Social Science Elective (one course 
selected from: anthropology, 
economics, geography, political 
science, or sociology) 3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English (two courses 200 level 

or above) 6 

Fine Arts (AA 100) 3 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 

Library Science 201 3 

Physical Education Activity 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Social Science Electives 6 

(two courses selected from: 

anthropology, economics, 

geography, political science, or 



Library Science/ 1 97 

sociology) 

Speech Communication III 3 

University Forum "Man, Science, 

and Society" Lectures A 

30 30 

Non-Certification Emphasis 1 
JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Library Science 405, 41 1 , 416 9 Library Science 401 , 406, 489 10 

Library Science Electives 3 Library Science Electives 3 

Minor Requirements 9 Minor Requirements 9 

Electives 13 Electives L2 

34 34 

TOTAL: 128 

'Non-Certification library science students must also complete the requirements for a minor, or a dual major in another 
field, and enough elective hours from any department of the University to complete the 128 semester hours required for a 
degree. Students should see their adviser for assistance in planning their minor or dual major. 



Certification Emphasis 2 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 370 or 372, 374 , . 6 Library Science 401 , 406, 

Library Science 405, 408, 409, 41 1 , 426 12 

416, 417, or 418 15 Library Science Elective 3 

Research and Foundations 300 3 Research and Foundations 469 3 

Electives (Subject Area Minor) 12 Secondary Education 313, 492 12 

Electives (Subject Area 

Minor) j6 

36 36 

TOTAL: 132 

'Certification requirements in the State of Mississippi will change on September I, 1981. Students should see their adviser 
or the dean of the School of Library Service for further information concerning certification requirements. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Any student from any school or college in the University may elect a minor in Library 
Science providing he has the approval of his adviser and has officially notified the Office of 
the Dean of the School of Library Service of his interest in seeking a minor. 

A minor is particularly recommended for those students who are majoring in arts and 
sciences or a professional field such as business but plan on seeking a graduate degree in 
Library Science after the completion of their baccalaureate studies. 

The following 18 hours are suggested for a minor in Library Science: LS 401, 405, 406, 
411,416; electives 3 hours. 

Teaching Certification 

Although students majoring in Library Science will normally receive their bachelor's 
degree as offered by the School of Library Service, all students who desire to be certified 
school librarians— media specialists must also file a program plan with the Teacher Educa- 
tion Program within the College of Education and Psychology and be accepted by the 
Teacher Education Program. The National Teachers Examinations are required of all can- 
didates for teaching degrees. 



198/School of Library Service 

Advisement 

Upon admission to the School, the student is assigned an adviser by the Office of the 
Dean. His adviser will approve his schedule each semester, provide counsel when necessary 
and sign his application for degree as the first step toward meeting degree requirements. 

Academic Suspensions 

Students must maintain the academic standards, as stipulated in the Academic Re- 
quirements section of this Bulletin, to assure readmission each semester. Academic suspen- 
sion requires the Dean's approval prior to readmission. 

Waiver or Substitution of Major Requirements 

Any waiver or substitution of major requirements must be approved by the Dean of 
the School. 

Placement 

The School cooperates with the University Placement Services in assisting its graduates 
in finding positions. The student is expected to establish a file with the Placement Services 
two semesters before graduation to avail himself of the opportunities to be interviewed or 
contacted by the many libraries and governmental bodies interested in library science 
graduates. 

Student Organizations and Financial Assistance 

The School encourages students to join and actively support the activities of the 
Library Science Student Association. Students are urged to become student members of the 
American Library Association and the Mississippi Library Association and to attend 
meetings of these organizations whenever possible. Often these professional conferences 
provide job placement services. 

Some funds are available exclusively for financial assistance to deserving students in 
the School of Library Service. Inquiry should be directed to the Dean's Office. Students 
may also apply for financial assistance by writing to: 

Director of Financial Aid 

Southern Station, Box 5101 

Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 
ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 



Department Major Degree' 

NURSING-BACCALAUREATE STUDIES 

NURSING BS 



•Degree Abbreviation: (BS) Bachelor of Science 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Elizabeth C. Harkins, Dean 
Flora L. Bain, Assistant Dean 

PURPOSE 

The primary purpose of the undergraduate program in nursing is to provide the stu- 
dent with a sound preparation for nursing practice. The Baccalaureate Program offers 
broad prepartion in general education, as well as education for the professional practice of 
nursing. Courses in the liberal arts and humanities, the sciences, and the professional com- 
ponents are selected to prepare the student to assume effectively his role as an individual, as 
a citizen, and as a professional practitioner. The primary purpose of the Continuing Educa- 
tion Program in nursing is to improve nursing by offering opportunities for nurses to ex- 
pand their knowledge and enlarge their sphere of interest through planned activities. 

HISTORY 

Following a year of planning and curriculum development, the first students were ad- 
mitted to the School of Nursing in September, 1967. The School of Nursing received Na- 
tional League for Nursing accreditation in 1969. The first Bachelor of Science degrees with 
Nursing as a major were conferred in May. 1969. 

ACCREDITATION 

The School of Nursing program is accredited by the National League for Nursing. The 
School is approved by the Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning and is 
a member of the National League for Nursing. 

BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 

C. Adams, Bates, Benjamin, Bloodsworth, S. Bowman, M. Bryant, Bryson, 

Cabaniss, C. Carr, S. Carr, Denkler, Dubuisson, Eidson, Farrell, Finnegan, 

Freeman, Goins, Hayes, Haynie, Herrington, T. Hildman, Hobson, Huch, 

Hutchinson, S. Kelly, Lester, McHenry, P. Martin, Padgett, Porter, Pouncey, 

Redwood, Richeson, M. Sisemore, Stokes, Stovall, C. Wilson 

The School of Nursing - Baccalaureate Program offers studies leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Upon completion of the program, the graduate is prepared 
to practice as a professional nurse in a variety of settings. 



200/School of Nursing 



ADMISSION 



Applicants for admission to the Baccalaureate Program of the School of Nursing must 
fulfill the general University requirements as described in the Admission section of the 
Bulletin. All entering freshman nursing students must have an ACT score of 18 or higher. 
All transfer students with less than 18 ACT must have an overall GPA of 2.5 on all work at- 
tempted prior to admission to the nursing program and must complete all the courses re- 
quired in the first year of the nursing curriculum with no less than a C in each of the 
natural, behavioral, and social science courses before being admitted into the nursing pro- 
gram. 



PROMOTION 

The School of Nursing has established criteria and procedures governing student pro- 
gression through the Baccalaureate Program in nursing. The student record is reviewed on 
a regular schedule to determine eligibility for progression in the program. 



STUDENT ADVISEMENT 

The faculty are responsible for academic counseling of all students enrolled in the pro- 
gram. Each student admitted to the program will be assigned an adviser. The adviser will 
assist the student in planning a program of study toward the degree, approve his schedule 
each semester, provide counsel, and sign his application for degree. 



FINANCIAL AID 

There are scholarship and loan funds available exclusively to students enrolled in the 
School of Nursing. Nursing students are also eligible to apply for assistance through other 
resources provided to students enrolled in the University. All applications for assistance 
should be forwarded to the Director of Financial Aid. 



EXPENSES 

The general fees and expenses are the same for nursing students as for other University 
students. Additional expenses incurred by nursing students such as uniforms, books, in- 
surance, student nurse organization fees, etc., are estimated as follows: 

1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th Year 

$25.00 $75.00 $400.00 $100.00 

Travel: Students are responsible for arranging transportation to off-campus hospitals 
and other agencies which constitute part of the program. 



CURRICULUM 

The program of study for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing includes specified re- 
quirements in the physical and biological sciences, in the social and behavioral sciences, and 
in the humanities. These courses are selected and placed for their foundational and sup- 
portive contributions to the study of nursing. The clinical laboratory classes are conducted 
in demonstration rooms and in settings where nursing care is needed. 

The curriculum in nursing is sequential; progression depends on successful completion 
of required courses in the preceding year. 

Registered nurses may establish by examination a maximum of twenty-five (25) hours 
of credit in nursing. (See also Challenge Examinations.) 

A student majoring in nursing must complete 128 hours including fifty-one (51) hours 
in nursing, the major, eighteen (18) hours in a selected minor, and fifty-nine (59) hours re- 
quired by the cores of the University and the School of Nursing. Upon completion of this 
program of study, the student is eligible to write the State Board Test Pool Examination. 



Nursing/201 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN NURSING 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 101, 220 8 

Chemistry 101 , 102 8 

English 101, 102 6 

Mathematics 101 3 

Nursing 101, 111 2 

Physical Education Elective 1 

Psychology 110 3 



31 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 333 3 

Genetics 451 3 

Humanities or Fine Arts 

Elective 3 

Nursing 304, 314-L, 324, 334-L, 

344, 351 21 

Psychology 436 ^3 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Anthropology Elective 3 

Biology 221 4 

Food and Nutrition 460 3 

Humanities or Fine Arts Elective 3 

Microbiology 401 4 

Nursing 201, 211-L 2 

Physical Education Elective 1 

Psychology 375 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Sociology 101 , 314 ._6 

32 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Elective - Any Area 3 

Nursing 404, 414-L, 424 

434-L, 444, 454, 462-L 26 

Psychology 360 3 



TOTAL: 



32 
128 



•If ACT is less than 20 on English Subtest score, English 100 is recommended. 



'If no high school chemistry, CHE 100 is prerequisite. 



'"•Electives - 9 hours (include 6 hours from Humanities; may select literature, allied arts, foreign language, 
history, philosophy, religion). 

MALPRACTICE INSURANCE 

Malpractice Insurance is required of all students enrolled in the upper division of the 
nursing program. 

MEDICAL EXAMINATION 

A medical examination is required during the last semester of the lower division of the 
nursing curriculum and periodically for the remainder of the time required to complete the 
program. 



NURSING-CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Wynema McGrew, Chairman 
May, Neeley, Pritchett 
The Continuing Education Program of the School of Nursing is accredited by the 
American Nurses' Association, Southeastern Regional Accrediting Committee, and the Na- 
tional League for Nursing. This program offers credit and non-credit courses, workshops, 
conferences, and independent study units for registered nurses throughout the State of 
Mississippi. The purpose of the program is to increase the quality of nursing care by pro- 
viding means for nurses to update nursing knowledge and to acquire new knowledge and 
skills. 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 
ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 



Department Major Emphasis 


Degree*** 


BIOLOGY 




BIOLOGY* 


BA.BS 


Botany 




Fisheries Biology 




Marine Biology 




Wildlife Biology 




Zoology 




(PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES)** 




CHEMISTRY 




CHEMISTRY* 


BS 


Non-ACS Certified 




ACS Certified 




COMPUTER SCIENCE AND STATISTICS 




COMPUTER SCIENCE* 


BS 


Computer Science 




Systems Science 




COMPUTER SCIENCE/DATA PROCESSING 


BS 


Data Processing 




COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 


BS 


Computer Technology 




STATISTICS* 


BS 


Statistics 




CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY 




ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY 


BS 


Architectural Technology 




BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 


BS 



GEOLOGY 



GEOLOGY 1 



Construction Technology 



Geology 



INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY 

Electronics Technology 

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 

Environmental Technology 
Environmental Health - Industrial 

Hygiene 
Environmental Health - Sanitation 
Technology 

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

Industrial Technology 

Electric Power Systems Technology 

MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Mechanical Technology 



MATHEMATICS 



MATHEMATICS* 

Mathematics 



BS 

BS 
BS 

BS 
BS 

BA,BS 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY BS 

Medical Technology 

MICROBIOLOGY 

FOOD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BS 

Food Science Technology 
MICROBIOLOGY BS 

Microbiology 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

PHYSICS* BS 

Physics 

POLYMER SCIENCE 

PLASTICS TECHNOLOGY* BS 

Plastics Technology 
POLYMER SCIENCE* BS 

Polymer Science 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 

SCIENCE EDUCATION* BS 

Biology Education 
Chemistry Education 
Earth Science Education 
Physics Education 



•Minor Available 
**This program does not lead to a degree. Students completing pre-professional programs will select an academic major 
with an emphasis in the appropriate pre-professional area. 
••♦Degree Abbreviations: (BA) Bachelor of Arts, (BS) Bachelor of Science 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Gary C. Wildman, Dean 
Karen M. Yarbrough, Assistant to the Dean 

The College of Science and Technology provides the student training in all of the 
classical fields of science, several contemporary multidisciplinary areas, and "career- 
oriented" technology degree programs. 

The College of Science and Technology is organized into twelve departments and five 
institutes. The departments include Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science and Statistics, 
Construction and Architectural Technology, Geology, Industrial Technology, 
Mathematics, Medical Technology, Microbiology, Physics and Astronomy, Polymer 
Science, and Science Education. The institutes are the Institute of Environmental Science, 
the Institute of Genetics, the Institute of Microbiology and Related Sciences, the Institute 
of Surface Coatings, and the Mississippi Polymer Institute. In addition to the degree pro- 
grams that are synonymous with the above listed department names, curricula are offered 
in Electronics Technology, Environmental Technology, Mechanical Technology, Com- 
puter Technology, Data Processing, Food Science and Technology, and Plastics 
Technology. 

Pre-Professional Curricula are offered by the College of Science and Technology in 
the following health related areas: medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, 
physical therapy, optometry, dental hygiene, and medical records administartion. The Col- 
lege also provides a pre-engineering curriculum. 

The College shares with the College of Education and Psychology joint responsibility 
for the Department of Science Education, embracing a sequence of courses titled Fun- 
damentals of Science, and offering a major in science education for teachers. 

A student wishing to obtain either a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree 
from the College of Science and Technology must complete the following College of 
Science and Technology requirements. 

Hours 

English 101 , 102, and 333 9 

Science: fourteen hours; a 

a minimum of 8 must be in laboratory sciences 14 

Mathematics (not to include MAT 199) 9 

Six (6) hours from the following areas: religion, literature, allied 

arts, foreign language, philosophy, history 6 

Nine hours from the following areas, with no more than three 

hours from any one area: political science, geography, 

sociology, psychology, economics, anthropology 9 

Physical Education or ROTC/AFROTC 2 

Foreign language may be required at the option of the department. 

The student seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete three (3) additional hours 

of English and meet the following requirements: 

•Foreign Language 6-9 

'Students who have two years of the same language in high school and who make satisfactory placement test scores may 
meet the language requirement by completing six semester hours at the 200-level or above. 

INSTITUTE OF GENETICS 

Karen M. Yarbrough, Director 
Peebles, Stoddard 
The Institute of Genetics provides facilities for undergraduate and graduate education 
in genetics and services to University personnel and students as well as families throughout 
the community and region. Information regarding academic requirements may be obtained 
from the Undergraduate Bulletin or the Graduate Bulletin under the Department of 
Microbiology. 

Members of the Institute's staff operate within the framework of the Center for Health 
Realted Sciences in order to provide coordinated, comprehensive services. The Institute's 



Health Related Sciences/205 

services include chromosomal culturing and karyotyping, sex chromatin tests, der- 
matoglyphic studies and genetic counseling. These services are available at nominal fees on 
a referral basis or by applying directly to the Institute of Genetics. 

MISSISSIPPI POLYMER INSTITUTE 

B. George Bufkin, Director 

Burks, Hester, McCormick, Neidlinger, 

Seymour, Thames, Wildman 

The Mississippi Polymer Institute was approved by the Board of Trustees in September 
1978. The purpose of the Institute is to conduct research designed to increase the utilization 
of Mississippi raw materials in polymers and to support the rapidly growing Mississippi 
polymer industry. The Institute is an integral part of the College of Science and Technology 
and functions in concert with the Department of Polymer Science. 

THE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR 
HEALTH RELATED SCIENCES 

Karen M. Yarbrough, Director 

Executive Council: Bates, Denton, Dickson, McCarthy, 

Rhodes, Sanford, Toom 

PURPOSES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

The University of Southern Mississippi Center for Health Realted Sciences (CHRS) is 
an innovative educational and clinical complex designed to provide health related services 
and academic training. Its purposes and responsibilities are: 

1 . to provide education and training for: 

a. University students seeking degrees in one of the health related fields; and 

practicing professionals or paraprofessionals who wish to gain further 
knowledge or experience in a specific or broad inter-disciplinary clinical pro- 
gram on a continuing basis; 

2. to provide certain health related services not presently available to the University 
community, the local community, the State of Mississippi, and surrounding states, 
and to supplement existing services; and 

3. to provide a proper setting for conducting applied and pure research in health 
related disciplines. 

AFFILIATED PROGRAMS 

Clinical Psychology. See College of Education and Psychology 

Family Life Services. See School of Home Economics. 

Food and Nutrition (Dietetics). See School of Home Economics. 

Gerontology. See School of Social Work. 

Genetics. See College of Science and Technology. 

Medical Technology. See College of Science and Technology. 

Nursing. See School of Nursing. 

Social Work. See School of Social Work. 

Speech and Hearing. See College of Liberal Arts. 

AFFILIATED HOSPITALS) 

Ellisville State School, Ellisville, Mississippi 

Forrest County General Hospital, Hattiesburg, Mississippi 

Gulf Coast Community Hospital, Biloxi, Mississippi 

Hinds General Hospital, Jackson, Mississippi 

Memorial Hospital, Gulfport, Mississippi 

Singing River Hospital, Pascagoula, Mississippi 



206/College of Science and Technology 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Donald E. Norris, Director 

The Office of Pre-Professional Curricula administers undergraduate programs leading 
to professional education in any of eight health related sciences. These pre-professional 
curricula prepare students for study of medicine, dentistry, dental hygiene, veterinary 
medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, medical records administration, and optometry. 
The curricula, outlined below, vary in content and duration; all lead to professional study 
at another university which awards a certificate or degree at completion of the program. 

Admission to any professional school for study of a health related science is highly 
competitive. Successful applicants will have achieved consistantly superior grades, chosen 
rigorous elective courses, scored well on the national aptitude/achievement examination re- 
quired for that field, and demonstrated the quality of talent and maturity of interest 
necessary to pursue professional study. 

Each pre-professional student is advised by a member of the Pre-Professional Com- 
mittee, which is comprised of faculty experienced in undergraduate counseling within these 
fields of study. 

PRE-MEDICAL PROGRAM 

Advisers: Anselm C. Griffin, Donald E. Norris 
Wallace C. Pye, Raymond W. Scheetz, George S. Torrey 

Schools of medicine have fundamentally similar minimal requirements for admission. 
Generally, these requirements include completion of specified courses in English, biology, 
chemistry, physics, and mathematics; three years (at least 90 semester hours) of college 
work; and scores from the nationally-administred Medical College Admissions Test 
(MCAT). The minimal curriculum serves only as a foundation upon which a complete 
academic program is built. Schools of medicine normally advise pre-medical students to 
major in the subject area of their choice and to plan to complete a baccalaureate degree. 

The curriculum outlined here meets only minimal requirements for admission to the 
School of Medicine of the University of Mississippi and to other medical schools. Student 
and pre-medical adviser plan a complete program of study which will satisfy the personal 
educational needs of the student while enabling the student to compete for admission to 
medical school. Pre-medical students do not major in "pre-med." Rather, as they follow a 
pre-medical curriculum, they work toward completing a baccalaureate degree in the field of 
their choice by meeting the requirements for the college core, a major field, and a minor 
field, with a total of 128 hours. Generally, the first two years are devoted to meeting the 
pre-medical and college core requirements and the last two in completing pre-medical elec- 
tives and remaining degree requiements. Students prepare to take the MCAT the fall of the 
junior year and to make application to medical school the fall of the senior year. 

Exceptional students with as few as 90 semester hours credit, who otherwise meet ad- 
missions criteria, may be admitted to medical school; under certain conditions, these in- 
dividuals may transfer credits from their first year at medical school and receive the 
bachelor's degree from the University of Southern Mississippi. 

RECOMMENDED MINIMAL PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM 

Hours 

Biology 101 , 101L; 202, 202L; 41 1 , 41 1L 12 

Chemistry 101, 101L; 102, 102L:, 351, 351L; 

352, 352L; 421 or 426 20 

English 101 , 102, 333 9 

Mathematics 101, 103, 276 or 314, 

or advanced electives in mathematics 9 

Physics 101, 101L; 102, 102L 8 

Science electives, including especially 

courses such as comparative anatomy, 

cellular physiology, embryology, genetics, 



Health Related Sciences/207 

physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, 

calculus, differential equations, and 

advanced physics 8 

Students should plan to complete requirements for a baccalaureate degree, including 
those for the college core, a major field, and a minor field, with a total of 128 semester 
hours. 



PRE-DENTAL PROGRAM 

Adviser: Bobby L. Middlebrooks 

Minimal requirements for admission to most schools of dentistry are similar and nor- 
mally include completion of specified courses in English, biology, chemistry, physics, and 
mathematics; three years (at least 90 semester hours) of college work; and scores from the 
nationally-administered Dental Admission Test (DAT). The minimal curriculum serves on- 
ly as a foundation upon which a complete academic program is built. Students are advised 
to complete requirements for a baccalaureate degree in the subject area of their choice. 

The curriculum outlined here meets only minimal requirements for admission to the 
School of Dentistry of the University of Mississippi. Student and pre-dental adviser plan a 
complete program of study which will satisfy the personal educational needs of the student 
while enabling the student to compete for admission to dental school. Pre-dental students 
do not major in "pre-dent." Rather, as they follow a pre-dental curriculum, they work 
toward completing a baccalaureate degree in the field of their choice by meeting the re- 
quirements for the college core, a major field, and a minor field, with a total of 128 hours. 
Generally, the first two years are devoted to meeting the pre-dental and college core re- 
quirements and the last two in completing pre-dental electives and remaining degree re- 
quirements. Students prepare to take the DAT the fall of the junior year and to make ap- 
plication to dental school the fall of the senior year. 

Exceptional students with as few as 90 semester hours credit, who otherwise meet ad- 
missions criteria, may be admitted to dental school; under certain conditions, those in- 
dividuals may transfer credits from their first year at dental school and receive the 
bachelor's degree from the University of Southern Mississippi. 



RECOMMENDED MINIMAL PRE-DENTAL CURRICULUM 

Hours 

Biology 101 , 101L; 102, 102L; 320, 320L 12 

Chemistry 101, 101L; 102, 102L; 351, 351L; 

352, 352L; 31 1, 31 1L or 361 21 or 22 

English 101 , 102, 203, 204, 332 15 

Mathematics 101 , 103, or advanced 

electives in mathematics 6 

Physics 101, 101L; 102, 102L 8 

Psychology 1 10 and elective in psychology 6 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Students should plan to complete requirements for a baccalaureate degree, including 
those for the college core, a major field, and a minor field, with a total of 128 hours. 



PRE-DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM 

Adviser: Wallace C. Pye 

The University of Southern Mississippi offers a one-year pre-professional program in 
dental hygiene. Two additional years, leading to a certificate, are taken within the Depart- 
ment of Dental Hygiene, University of Mississippi Medical Center, for which admission is 
highly competitive. Additional information appears in the Bulletin of the Medical Center. 



208/College of Science and Technology 

RECOMMENDED PRE-DENTAL HYGIENE CURRICULUM 



Hours 



Biology 101 , 101 L 4 

Chemistry 100 or 101, 101L 3 or 4 

English 101 , 102 6 

Psychology 110 3 

Sociology 101 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Electives 6 

NOTE: The Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test (DHAT) is required for admission to dental 
hygiene programs. It should be taken in the fall semester of the student's pre-professional 
year. 



PRE-VETERINARY PROGRAM 

Adviser: Bobby L. Middlebrooks 

Residents of Mississippi wishing to study veterinary medicine may make application 
only to the College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University. Criteria for admis- 
sion to that college are given in the MSU publication "Requirements for Application to the 
College of Veterinary Medicine," which is available from the pre-veterinary adviser. Can- 
didates are evaluated on the basis of pre-veterinary academic preparation, as well as exper- 
tise in management of domestic animals and experience within the food-animal industry. 

The curriculum presented here satisfies minimal course requirements for admission to 
MSU College of Veterinary Medicine. Although only sixty-five (65) semester hours are re- 
quired for admission, students are strongly advised to work towards completing the bac- 
calaureate degree in a field of science by meeting requirements for the College core, a major 
field, and a minor field, with a total of 128 hours. Students may acquire experience with 
local veterinary clinics through a co-op program offered by the Office of Cooperative 
Education. 



RECOMMENDED MINIMAL PRE-VETERINARY CURRICULUM 

Hours 

Biology 101, 101L; 102, 102L; 202, 202L 12 

Chemistry 101, 101L; 102, 102L; or 351, 351L; 

352.352L 17 

English 101 , 102, 333 9 

Mathematics 101 , 103, or advanced electives 

in mathematics 6 

Physics 101, 101L; 102, 102L 8 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Electives in history, political science, 

sociology, economics, literature, music, 

art, philosophy, psychology, geography (6 hrs.); and in science (4 hrs.) 10 



PRE-PHARMACY PROGRAM 

Adviser: Raymond W. Scheetz 
Colleges of pharmacy normally require two years of pre-professional training, but 
minimal requirements for admission vary. Student and pre-pharmacy adviser will design 
the academic program to specifically meet the admission criteria for the college of phar- 
macy which the student wishes to attend. The program outlined here meets admission re- 
quirements of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Mississippi. 



Health Related Sciences/209 

RECOMMENDED PRE-PHARMACY CURRICULUM 

Hours 

Biology 101 , 101L; 102, 102L 8 

Chemistry 101, 101 L; 102, 102L; 351, 351L; 

352, 352L 17 

Economics 200 3 

English 101 , 102 6 

Mathematics 101 , 103, or advanced electives 

in mathematics 6 

Microbiology 101, 101L 4 

Physics 101, 101L; 102, 102L 8 

Electives, including courses such as typing, 

statistics, public speaking, and accounting 16 



PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM 

Adviser: Anselm C. Griffin 
The curriculum outlined here fulfills course requirements for admission to the Depart- 
ment of Physical Therapy, School of Health Related Professions, University of Mississippi. 
A minimum of sixty-five (65) semester hours is required, and students must have observed 
the work of a clinical department of physical therapy for at least eight (8) hours prior to ap- 
plication. A student wishing to enter another professional school will plan an appropriate 
curriculum with the adviser for the pre-physical therapy program. 



RECOMMENDED PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY CURRICULUM 

Hours 

Biology 101 , 101L; 202, 202L; 220, 220L 

and 221 , 221L, or 320, 320L 12 or 16 

Chemistry 101, 101L; 102, 102L 8 

English 101 3 

Mathematics 101 3 

Physics 101, 101L; 102, 102L 8 

Psychology 101 ; and 375 or 436 or EPY 370 6 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Elective in sociology, economics, 

political science, history, or 

anthropology 3 

Electives in classical civilization, 

modern language, fine arts, philosophy, 

or religion 9 

Electives in approved courses to bring 

the total semester hours credit to 65. 

PRE-OPTOMETRY PROGRAM 

Adviser: Wallace C. Pye 

Students wishing to study optometry must complete two or more years in a pre- 
professional program. Currently, only programs at the University of Alabama at Birm- 
ingham and the Southern College of Optometry admit residents of Mississippi to profes- 
sional study under SREB contracts. The criteria for admission to these programs are 
dissimilar, and the student and pre-optometry adviser will determine the exact pre- 
professional curriculum to be followed. The curriculum outlined here is illustrative and 
does not reflect the specific entrance requirements of a particular school of optometry. 



212/College of Science and Technology 



Marine Biology Emphasis 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 315 3 

Biology Elective (botany or zoology) 3 

Biology Electives (423, 428, 429, 436, 
437, 440, 444, 461 , 462, 467, and/or 
summer courses at Gulf Coast Research 

Laboratory) 9-10 

Chemistry 321 (if using 200 level 

option) 3 

Genetics 402 3 

Recommended Electives 7-8 

Social Sciences or Humanities Core 3 



SENIOR YEAR S EM. HRS. 

Biology Elective (zoology or botany) 3 

Biology Electives (423, 428, 429, 436, 

437, 440, 444, 461 , 462, 467) 12 

Electives 15 

English 333 3 



Wildlife Biology Emphasis 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 315 3 

Biology Elective (botany or zoology) 3 

Biology Electives (404, 420, 428, 438, 

440,444,449,453,461,462,466) 12 

Chemistry 321 (if using 200 level 

option) 3 

Genetics 402 3 

Recommended Electives 7-8 

Social Sciences or Humanities Core 3 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology Elective (zoology or botany) 3 

Biology Electives (404, 420, 428, 438, 

440, 444, 449, 453, 461 , 462, 466) 12 

Electives 15 

English 333 3 



Fisheries Biology Emphasis 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 315 3 

Biology Elective (botany or zoology) 3 

Biology Electives (404, 428, 429, 432, 
436, 437, 438, 440, 444, 445, 449, 

453, 461 , 462, 466) 12 

Chemistry 321 (if using 200 level 

option) 3 

Genetics 402 3 

Recommended Electives 7-8 

Social Sciences or Humanities Core 3 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology Elective (zoology or botany) 3 

Biology Electives (404, 428, 429, 432, 
436, 437, 438, 440, 444, 445, 449, 

453,461,462,466) 12 

Electives 15 

English 333 3 



Botany Emphasis 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 315 3 

Biology Elective (zoology) 3 

Biology Electives (448, 449, 450, 45 1 , 

453, 454, 455, 457, 458, 475, 493) 12 

Chemistry 321 (if using 200 level 

option) 3 

Genetics 402 3 

Recommended Electives 7-8 

Social Sciences or Humanities Core 3 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology Electives (448, 449, 450, 451, 

453, 454, 455, 457, 458, 475, 493) 12 

Electives 18 

English 333 3 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Zoology Emphasis 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



Chemistry/213 



SEM. HRS. 



Biology 315 3 

Biology Elective (botany) 3 

Biology Electives (320, 411, 420, 422, 
423, 426, 432, 435, 436, 437, 440, 

461,465) 12 

Chemistry 321 (if using 200 level 

option) 3 

Genetics 402 3 

Recommended Electives 7-8 

Social Sciences or Humanities Core 3 



Biology Electives (320, 411, 420, 422, 
423, 426, 432, 435, 436, 437, 440, 

461,465) 12 

Electives 18 

English 333 3 



3. Recommended courses in area of pre-professional training in medicine, dentistry, 
pharmacy, and veterinary science are outlined in this Bulletin in the beginning sec- 
tion of the College of Science and Technology. 

GULF COAST RESEARCH LABORATORY 

The University of Southern Mississippi is closely allied with the Gulf Coast Research 
Laboratory at Ocean Springs. Staff members and biology majors in both the graduate and 
undergraduate schools have been active participants in the work at the Gulf Coast Research 
Laboratory. It is strongly recommended that all majors in biology take at least a six-weeks, 
program in marine biology as offered at the Laboratory. The following courses are taught 
only at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory: Biology 481, 483, 484, 485, 486, 487, 488, 
489. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

David L. Wertz, Chairman 

A. Bedenbaugh, J. Bedenbaugh, Creed, Elakovich, Evans, Fawcett, 

Griffin, J. Howell, McCain, Pinson, Toom, van Aller, H. Williams 

A student majoring in Chemistry must work toward the Bachelor of Science degree. 

For information concerning the Master of Science degree and the Doctor of Philosophy 

degree, see the Graduate Bulletin. A major in Chemistry includes satisfaction of the general 

core requirements of the University and the College of Science and Technology and no less 

than thirty-four (34) semester hours of chemistry. A minor is not required. The lecture and 

laboratory portions of required courses must be taken concomitantly. 

REQUIREMENTS OF A MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

(ACS CERTIFIED DEGREE) 

The Department of Chemistry is accredited by the Division of Chemical Education of 
the American Chemical Society. A chemistry major may graduate as a chemist certified by 
the American Chemical Society. Degree certification requires the following curriculum: 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 101, 101 L, 102, 

102L 8 

'Elective 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities Core 3 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Social Science Core ^ 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 311, 31 1L, 351, 35 1L, 

352, 352L,411,411L 18 

Mathematics 278, 377 or 276, 277, 

378 9 

Physical Education 2 

Social Science Core 3 



32 



214/College of Science and Technology 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM.HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Chemistry 461, 46 1L, 462, 

462L 8 

English 333 3 

Mathematics 405 3 **Electives 

Physics 201, 201 L, 202, 202L, 

or 101, 101L, 102, 102L 10 

'Electives ._8 

32 



Chemistry 400, 426, 43 1 9 

*Chemistry electives 6 

Humanities Core 3 

14 



TOTAL: 



32 
128 



•CHE electives to be chosen from 300, 401 , 402, 403, 427L, 432, 441 , 451 , 496. CHE 421 and 422 may be substituted for 
CHE 426 and one chemistry elective. 

••Recommended electives are GEN 402, CSS 240, CSS 340, GLY 101, PHY 361, PSC4I2, FL 121, 122, 161, 162, 221, 
222,261,262, MAT 411. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

(NON-ACS CERTIFIED DEGREE) 

A major in Chemistry will include not less than thirty-four (34) semester hours of 
chemistry. Minimum requirements are: 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 101, 101L, 102, 102L 8 

Elective 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities Core 3 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Social Science Core ^ 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 311,311L,411,411L 9 

English 333 3 

Electives 20 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 351 , 351L, 352, 352L 9 

Mathematics 278, 377 or 276, 277 6-9 

Physical Education 2 

Social Science Core 3 

Electives 9-12 

32 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 461 , 461 L, 462, 462L 8 

Humanities Core 3 

Electives 2| 

32 
TOTAL: 128 



COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

(SECONDARY EDUCATION DEGREE) 

A major in Chemistry for secondary education will include not less than thirty-two (32) 
in science of which twenty-five (25) hours must consist of: 

Chemistry 101, 101L, 102, 102L, 251, 251L, 31 1, 31 1L, 321, 321L. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
COMPUTER SCIENCE AND STATISTICS 

Danny R. Carter, Chairman 
Bisland, Bremmer, Burge, R.A. Cade, Gambrell, Green, Howell, 
Hyatt, Nagurney, Rimes, Seymour 
The Computer Science and Statistics Department is designed to meet the great demand 
for trained personnel in electronic computers, and statistics in business, science, engineer- 
ing, government, and the academic world. Current course offerings provide for an 



Computer Science and Statistics/2 1 5 

academic major in computer science, data processing, computer technology, systems 
science, or statistics at the undergraduate level and a major in computer science or statistics 
at the graduate level. 

The department has initiated a cooperative education program with industry for selec- 
tive students. The students selected for this program attend school and work on alternate 
semesters. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Computer Science 100, 240 6 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities Core 6 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Physical Education, ROTC/AFROTC ... 2 

Social ScienceCore ^6 

32 



Computer Science 320, 340, 341 9 

Electives 6 

Lab Science 8 

>Mathematics276or278,277or377 6or9 

Social ScienceCore 3 



32or35 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Computer Science 342, 44 1 , 460, 470, 
470L , 490, one elective from 323 , 
324, 420, 42 1,425 or 

471,471L 19or20 

English333 3 

♦Mathematics 378, 385 6 

Science ^3 

31or32 



Computer Science41 5, 416 or 435, 436, 
46 1 , 462 , 490, two electives from 
350,442,477,478, 

478L.480 19or22 

Electives 7 

Geography416 3 

Science ._3 

31or35 



•Students may select a subjeci other than mathematics for a minor. The minor consist of eighteen ( 18) hours. Suggested minors 
include the following: accounting, electronics technology , geography , physics or statistics. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN STATISTICS 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Computer Science 240, 340 6 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities Core 6 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Physical Education, ROTC/AFROTC ... 2 

Social ScienceCore ^ 

32 



Computer Science 211, 212, 320 9 

Electives 6 

Lab Science 8 

■Mathematics276or278,277or377 6or9 

Social ScienceCore 3 



32or35 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Computer Science 415, 416, 420, 422, 

490 13 

English333 3 

>Mathematics326,378,385 9 

Science 6 

3l 



Computer Science 417, 418, 435, 436, 

441 17 

Electives 12 

Management 360 3 



32 



•Students may select a subject other than Mathematics for a minor. The minor consists of eighteen ( 1 8) hours. Suggested 
minors include the following: accounting, electronics technology, geography, physics or statistics. 



216/CoIlege of Science and Technology 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN DATA PROCESSING 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 100, 240 6 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities Core 6 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Physical Education, ROTC/AFROTC . . 2 

Social Science Core ^6 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 201 , 202 6 

Computer Science 320, 340, 341 9 

Economics 255 3 

General Business 295 3 

Lab Science 8 

Mathematics 312 .3 

32 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Accounting 301 , 302 6 Accounting 320, 330, 401 or 409 9 

Computer Science 342, 350, 422, 441, Computer Science 211, 212, 442, 480.14 

490 15 Electives 9 

English 333 3 

Management 360 3 

Science ^6 

33 32 

This is an interdisciplinary major offered in conjunction with the School of Professional 
Accountancy, College of Business Administration. A minor is not required. 



Requirements for an Emphasis in Systems Science 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 240, 340 6 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities Core 6 

Mathematics 276, 277 6 

Physics 201 , 201 L, 202, 202L 10 

34 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 320, 341 , 420, 441 14 

Mathematics 378, 379 6 

Physics 327, 327L 4 

Social Science Core 6 

Physical Education, ROTC/AFROTC . . /I 

32 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 323, 324, 415, 416, 

470, 470L, 47 1 , 47 1 L 20 

English 333 3 

Mathematics 326, 385 6 

Physics 328, 328L or 421 3 or4 

32 or 33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 423, 435, 436, 476, 

478,478L 16 

Electives 10 

Mathematics 417 3 

Social Science Core ^3 

32 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 240, 340 6 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities Core 6 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Physical Education, ROTC/AFROTC .. 2 

Social Science Core .J> 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 341, 370, 371, 441 . 14 

Electives 3 or 4 

Lab Science 8 

Mathematics 276 or 278 3 or 5 

Social Science Core 3 

31 or 34 



Architectural Technology/217 
Software Emphasis 
JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Computer Science 460, 46 1 , 470, 470L , Computer Science 462, 477 , 478 , 478L , 

471, 471 L 14 480 15 

Electronics Technology312,312L, 332, Electives 3 

332L,413,413L 12 Electronics Technology333,333L, 470 

English 333 3 470L 8 

Science 3 Management 360 3 

Science /$ 

32 32 

Scientific Emphasis 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 320, 420, 421 , 470, 470L Computer Science 415, 416 or 435, 425, 

471, 471L 17 436, 460 12 

Electronics Technology 312, 3 12L, 332, Electronics Technology 333, 333L, 

332, 413, 413L 12 470, 470L 8 

English 333 3 Management 360 3 

Mathematics 277 or 377 3 or 4 Science 6 

35 or 36 29 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION AND 
ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY 

James W. Young, Chairman 
Boutwell, McGowen, Marchman, Mathis, Salinas 

The department offers two degree programs with emphasis in "career-oriented" 
education: Architectural Technology and Construction Technology. Students are en- 
couraged to seek work experience related to their area of interest prior to graduation. 
Potential transfer students from junior colleges are encouraged to consult with their adviser 
and the University curricula adviser as early as possible before transferring. 

ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY 

Ysidro Salinas, Program Adviser 
This program provides the student with a technical background in architectural prin- 
ciples and physical sciences, balanced by a foundation of humanities, social sciences, and 
communications. Graduates find employment in architectural offices in specifications, 
contract documents, field construction inspection, and office management; residential 
design and construction; technical sales for building products; and the related areas of en- 
vironmental design and planning. With appropriate experience, graduates may seek profes- 
sional status. The recommended sequence of courses is as follows: 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Architectural Techology * 1 32, Architectural Technology 241, 

♦132L, 204, 222, 323, 323L 12 261, 261L, 262, 262L, 324, 

Art Education 207 3 324L 12 



21 8/College of Science and Technology 



English 101, 102 6 

Humanities and Fine Arts Core 3 

Mathematics 101, 103 or 133 6 

Political Science 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



Construction Technology 205, 205L, 

235, 235L 6 

Mathematics 236 or 276 3 

Physics 105, 105L, 106, 106L 8 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Physical Education 1 



34 



33 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Architectural Technology 315, 

316, 325, 326, 338, 338L, 

342, 363, 363L, 364, 364L, 

443 . . 25 

Construction Technology 336, 



Architectural Technology 400, 

401, 457, 457L, 465, 465L 15 

Electives 6 

English 333 3 

Psychology 110 . 3 



336L, 354, 354L 6 Real Estate 330 3 



Economics 200 ^ Science Core* 

34 



TOTAL: 



31 
132 



•May be waived for one year of high school drafting. 
••See adviser for approved courses. 



CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 

James W. Young, Program Adviser 
The construction program is designed to educate the CONSTRUCTOR, utilizing a 
varied education base of business management, building technology, construction, and 
socio-humanistic studies. Constructor graduates enter the industry in field and office 
engineering, estimating and project management of residential, commercial, industrial, 
heavy-highway, and utility construction. This program follows the subject area guidelines 
recommended by the American Council for Construction Education and is affiliated with 
the Associated Schools of Construction. The recommended sequence of courses is as 
follows: 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Architectural Techology 

*132, *132L, 204 6 

Construction Technology 101, I OIL.... 2 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities and Fine Arts Core 3 

Geology 101 3 

Mathematics 101, 133 6 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Physical Education /I 

31 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Architectural Technology 241, 

315, 326 8 

Construction Technology 205, 205 L, 

235, 235L, 336, 336L 9 

Economics 200 3 

General Business 295 3 

Mathematics 236 3 

Physics 105, 105L, 106, 106L 8 



34 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Archiiectural Technology 316, 

342, 443 9 

Construction Technology 307, 307L, 

354, 354L, 355, 374, 375 13 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Construction Technology 444, 

445, 458, 458L, 476, 477 15 

Electives 6 

English 333 3 



Geology/219 



General Business 290, or 

Computer Science 240 3 

Humanities and Fine Arts Core 3 

Management 360 3 

Social Science Core .J 

34 



Industrial Technology 301 3 

Science Core** 3 

Social Science Core** 3 



TOTAL: 



33 
132 



•May be waived for one year of high school drafting. 
**See adviser for approved courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

Oscar Paulson, Chairman 
Bowen, Froelicher, Sundeen 

Students may major in geology as preparation for careers in development of natural 
resources, regional and national planning, research, secondary education, college and 
university teaching, oceanography, exploration of the Earth and Space, environmental 
studies, and other allied occupations. A Bachelor of Science and graduate work through the 
master's degree are offered in the department. 

High School Preparation. Secondary students planning to prepare for professional 
careers in the geological sciences should complete credits in biology, chemistry, and physics 
(if available), mathematics through second-year algebra, solid geometry, and trigonometry 
(or equivalent). Other desirable credits include foreign language, engineering drawing or 
similar courses in drafting and typing. 

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN GEOLOGY 

For the Bachelor of Science in Geology, the following courses, in addition to the re- 
quirements of the University Core and the College of Science and Technology, are re- 
quired: 

REQUIRED CURRICULUM FOR GEOLOGY MAJORS 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 101, 101 L 4 

Chemistry 101, 101L 4 

Chemistry 102, 102L 4 

English 101, 102 6 

Geology 101, 103 6 

Geology 101 L, 103L 2 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Physical Education A 

33 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Elective 4 

English 333 3 

Geology 308 4 

Geology 480 1 

Minor 6 

Physics 105, 105L 4 

Physics 106, 106L 4 

Summer Field Camp ^6 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Fine Arts & Humanities Core 6 

Geology 301, 301 L 4 

Geology 304 4 

Geology 341 4 

Mathematics 276 or 278 3-5 

Minor 3-6 

Physical Education 1 

Social Science Core ^ 

33 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Elective 16 

Geology 401 3 

Geology 403 4 

Minor 6 

Social Science Core 3 



32 
TOTAL: 130 



220/CoIlege of Science and Technology 

The requirement for field geology may be met by taking summer geology courses of- 
fered at marine stations, such as the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory in Ocean Springs, 
Mississippi, if the student demonstrates extenuating circumstances and upon approval by 
the Geology Department faculty. 

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY 

A minor of eighteen (18) hours is also required. Suggested minors include the follow- 
ing: biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, physics, general science (24 hrs.), 
or general business. 

GEOLOGY MINOR AND PREPARATION FOR SECONDARY 

EDUCATION, EARTH SCIENCE TEACHING 

The following courses are suggested for students seeking a geology minor or prepara- 
tion for earth science teaching in secondary schools: Geology 101, 101-L, 103, 103-L, 301, 
304, 310, and 341. 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

C. Howard Heiden, Chairman 
Baldwin, Bogart, Brent, Huey, Lipscomb, Moore 

The Department of Industrial Technology encompasses programs with direct applica- 
tion to industry to include mechanical technology, electronic technology, industrial 
technology, and three related programs in environmental technology. These programs are 
designed to give the student a working knowledge of industrial applications of his or her 
technical speciality and an understanding of the basic supervisory skills such as manage- 
ment principles, safety awareness, and financial concepts. Electives in the humanities and 
social sciences are encouraged to give the student a greater awareness and understanding of 
his or her future role in society. 

Suggested programs follow: 

MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Wesley L. Baldwin, Coordinator 
A major in Mechanical Technology prepares the student for supervisory positions in 
manufacturing by stressing machinery design and operation, production techniques, and 
interpersonal relations. All students must complete the following requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 , 102 6 Computer Science 240 3 

Graphics, INT 148, 249 6 Graphics, INT 250 3 

Humanities & Fine Arts Core 6 Engineering Economics, INT 301 3 

Mathematics 101, 133 6 Mathematics 236, 237 6 

Physical Education or ROTC 2 Mechanical Technology 330 3 

Social Science Core 6 Metals & Machining 1VE 360, 362 .... 6 

Physics 105, 106, 105L, I06L J 

32 32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Chemistry 101 , 101 L 4 Elective 3 

Electric Energy Systems, ELT 342 3 Industrial Technology 308, 405 6 



Environmental Technology/221 



English 333 3 Management 467 

Mechanical Technology, MET 331 3 Mechanical Technology 323, 361, 

Physics 332 3 362, 400, 401 , 444 

Social Science Core 3 

Statics, Strengths of Materials, 

ACT 241, 342 6 

Structure of Materials, PSC 330 3 

Technical elective ^6 

34 

TOTAL: 



30 

128 



ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 

(An ECPD Accredited Engineering Technology Program) 

Charles R. Brent, Coordinator 

A major in Environmental Technology offers an interdisciplinary course of study in 
chemistry, biology, and microbiology combined with courses in measurement and treat- 
ment of air, water, and solid waste in the industrial and residential environment. All 
students must complete the following requirements: 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 101, 102, 101L, 102L 8 

English 101, 102 6 

Environmental Science 105 1 

Humanities and Fine Arts Core 3 

Mathematics 101, 133 6 

Microbiology 101, 101L 4 

PE or ROTC 2 

Social Science Core ^3 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 101, 102, 101L, 102L 8 

Chemistry 311, 31 1L 5 

Computer Science 211, 240 6 

Environmental Science 205 1 

Humanities and Fine Arts Core 3 

Mathematics 236, 237 6 

Social Science Core 3 



32 



Environmental Technology Emphasis 
(An ECPD Accredited Engineering Technology Program) 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 351, 352, 35 1L, 352L 9 

English 333 3 

Environmental Science 301 , 302, 401 , 

402 14 

Geology 101 , 101 L 4 

Mechanical Technology 444 3 



33 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 46 1 or 462, 466, 46 1 L or 

462L.466L 6 

Electronics for Scientists, ELT 41 1 4 

Environmental Science 403 , 405 , 43 1 .... 1 1 

Industrial Technology 405 or 407 3 

Microbiology 47 1 , 47 1 L 4 

Social Science Core ^ 

31 
TOTAL: 129 



Environmental Health-Industrial Hygiene Emphasis" 
JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Biology 220, 221, 220L, 221L 8 

Chemistry 300 3 



Chemistry 35 1 , 352, 35 1 L, 352L 9 

Community Health, HSE 321 3 



222/College of Science and Technology 



English 333 3 

Environmental Science 301 , 330 6 

Management 386 3 

Physics 105, 106, 105L, 106L 8 

Social Science Core .J 

34 



Electronics for Scientists ELT 41 1 4 

Environmental Science 402, 403, 

431 12 

Industrial Technology 405 or 407 3 

Microbiology 47 1 , 47 1 L ._4 

35 
TOTAL: 134 



Environmental Health-Sanitation Emphasis* 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 101, 102, 101L, 102L 8 

English 101, 102 6 

Environmental Science 105 1 

Humanities and Fine Arts Core 3 

Mathematics 101 , 133 6 

Microbiology 101, 101L 4 

PE or ROTC 2 

Social Science Core ^3 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 311, 31 1L 5 

Computer Science 21 1 , 240 6 

Environmental Science 205 1 

Humanities and Fine Arts Core 3 

Mathematics 236, 237 6 

Physics 105, 106, 105L, 106L 8 

Social Science Core 3 



32 



JUNIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Chemistry 321, 351, 352, 321L, 351L, 

352L 13 

English 333 3 

Environmental Science 301 , 330 6 

Mechanical Technology 444 3 

Microbiology 301 , 301 L 4 

Sanitation for Institutions, IAD 273 3 

Social Science Core 3 



Biology 462, 466, 462L, 466L 6 

Environmental Science 401 , 403, 

405,431 15 

Industrial Technology 405 or 407 3 

Microbiology 47 1 , 47 1 L 4 

Technical Elective 3 



35 



TOTAL: 



31 
131 



»Not ECPD accredited 



INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

Joe Moore, Coordinator 
A major in Industrial Technology prepares the student for a supervisory position in in- 
dustry. Industrial product design, manufacturing methods and equipment, plant layout, 
planning, and innovative management techniques are stressed. All students must complete 
the following requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Graphics, INT 148 3 

Humanities & Fine Arts Core 6 

Mathematics 101, 133 6 

Physical Education or ROTC 2 

Physics 105, 106, 105L, 106L 8 

Social Science Core 3 



34 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 100 or 240, 211 6 

Engineering Economics, INT 301 3 

Environmental Science 301 3 

Graphics, INT 249, 250 6 

Manufacturing, INT 300 3 

Social Science Core 6 

Statics, ACT 241 3 

Strength of Materials, ACT 342 J 

33 



Electronics Technology/223 
Management Specialty* 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 333 3 Electronics, ELT 411 4 

Industrial Hygiene, ESC 43 1 4 Industrial Technology 400, 401 , 408, 

Industrial Technology 308, 405, 406, 409, 440, 443, 477 21 

407 12 Management, MGT 464, 465 6 

Management, MGT 360 3 

Mathematics 312 3 

Metals, IVE 360 3 

Structure of Materials, PSC 330 or 

IVE318 ._3 _ 

31 31 

TOTAL: 129 

Production Specialty* 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 333 3 Electronics, ELT 41 1 4 

Industrial Technology 308, 405, 406 9 Industrial Hygiene, ESC 43 1 4 

Industrial & Vocational Ed 33 1 , 333, Industrial Technology 400, 401 , 407, 

360 9 409 12 

Management, MGT 360 3 Industrial & Vocational Ed. 362, 462 6 

Mathematics 312 3 Management 464, 465 6 

Structure of Materials, PSC 330 or 

IVE318 J _ 

30 32 

TOTAL: 129 

*The managemeni specially stresses the developmeni of interpersonal skills which are used in the industrial environment. 
The production speciality stresses manipulative skills and a basic understanding of industrial management. 

ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY 

Ted Bogart, Coordinator 

The major in Electronics Technology offers a wide variety of modern topics in elec- 
tronics with an emphasis on digital electronics and micro-processors. Extensive laboratory 
equipment in the fields of communications, control systems, digital electronics, industrial 
instrumentation, and industrial energy systems is available for student laboratory ex- 
periments. Graduates are expected to have an extensive, practical knowledge of electronics 
and are expected to fill supervisory positions in industry. 

The Electronics Technology program is offered both as a "Two-plus-Two" program 

and as a 4-year baccalaureate program. Students transferring from a junior college or 

technical institute should have completed the following courses prior to entering USM. 

Students transferring to USM having completed these courses should expect to finish in 

four full-time semesters. 

Hours 

Basic AC/DC Circuits (with laboratory) 6 

Basic Electronic Devices (with laboratory) 6 

Intermediate Circuits (Communications, Microwave) 6 

Motors, Generators, Industrial Instrumentation 3 

Advanced Circuits (Logic, Digital) 6 

27 

English Composition (6), Algebra and Trigonometry (6), 
Physics (8), Graphics (3), Social Sciences and 

Humanities (15) 38 

TOTAL: 65 



224/College of Science and Technology 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS, 

English 101, 102 6 

Electronics Technology 101, 102, 

110, 111, 110L, 111L 10 

Mathematics 101, 133 6 

Physics 105, 106, 105L, 106L 8 

Physical Education or ROTC .2 

32 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 100, 240, 211 9 

Electronics Technology 313, 332, 

333,313L,332L,333L 12 

English 333 3 

Management 360or386 3 

HumanitiesandFineArtsCore 6 



33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Electronics Technology 210, 211, 220, 

230, 240, 342, 210L, 21 1L 20 

Mathematics 236, 237 6 

Social Science Core 6 



32 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Electronics Technology 400, 401, 412, 

470,412L,470L 14 

Electronics Electives 6 

Industrial Technology 301 , 405 or 407 .... 6 
MechanicalTechnology444orPHY332. . . 3 

Social Sciences Core 3 

Structureof Materials, PSC330 ^ 

35 
TOTAL: 132 



PRE-ENGINEERING CURRICULUM OUTLINES 

Jack Lipscomb, Coordinator 
The pre-engineering curriculum listed below is a two-year, freshman/sophomore level 
program designed to prepare students to enter the junior year of a four-year engineering 
school. The program is general in nature and can be applied to the following engineering 
curricula offered at engineering schools in Mississippi. Students planning to enter pre- 
engineering should have a strong interest and good aptitude in mathematics. 
Aerospace Engineering Electrical Engineering 

Agricultural Engineering Industrial Engineering 

Biological Engineering Mechanical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Nuclear Engineering 

Civil Engineering Petroleum Engineering 

(Students planning to transfer to out-of-state engineering schools should plan to meet with 
the pre-engineering adviser at the conclusion of their freshman year to plan an appropriate 
schedule of sophomore level courses.) 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PRE-ENGINEERING 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Chemistry 101, 102, 101L, 102L 8 

English 101 3 

Graphics, INT 148, 250 6 

Mathematics 278, 377 9 

Physical Education or ROTC 2 

Sociology 101 3 



31 



Computer Science 240 3 

Elective 3 

Engineering Economics, INT 301 3 

History 140 3 

Mathematics 379, 405 6 

Physics 201, 202, 201 L, 202L 10 

Political Science 101 3 

Psychology 110 ._3 

34 



(Students preparing to enter Chemical or Biological Engineering should take Chemistry 351 
and 351L, instead of PS 101, SOC lOl.orPSY 110). 



Mathematics/225 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 



James Caveny, Chairman 

L. Bell, D. Betounes, M. Betounes, B.J. Davis, Doblin, Dunigan, Essary, 

Fay, Jeter, R.W. King, Knighton, V. Mullins, Oxford, 

Pye, J. Thrash, Walls, Webster 

The Department of Mathematics offers a flexible curriculum for baccalaureate degrees 
so that individual students may tailor their university mathematics programs to fit specific 
educational and career objectives. The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in 
mathematics provide sound foundations for a broad latitude of careers in education, in- 
dustry, business and government. Most of today's challenging careers call for continuing 
education beyond the bachelor's degree, and an undergraduate major in mathematics pro- 
vides a versatile avenue for preparing for advanced studies in a number of fields including 
mathematics, computer science, statistics, management science, actuarial science, 
mathematics education, engineering, applied mathematics, law, and medicine. The Depart- 
ment of Mathematics offers the Master of Science degree, and, in cooperation with the Col- 
lege of Education and Psychology, the Master of Education, the Specialist, the Doctor of 
Education, and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. For information concerning degrees 
beyond the bachelor's degrees please consult the Graduate Bulletin. 

Students who have completed a college preparatory program in high school should 
begin their university mathematics program with Mathematics (MAT) 276 or 278. Students 
without this background should elect appropriate mathematics courses in consultation with 
their academic advisers. Mathematics majors should take MAT 341 and 326 concurrently 
with some of the calculus courses. Mathematics majors should not enroll in the courses 
MAT 112, 120, 131, 133, 199, 210, 236, 237, 310, 312, or 314 which are designed to serve 
the special interests of students in other departments and colleges. 

The curriculum of the Department of Mathematics is designed to meet the following 
objectives: 

(i) prepare students for industrial or commercial employment, 

(ii) prepare students to teach secondary school mathematics, 

(iii) prepare students for graduate study in mathematics and related fields, 

(iv) provide supportive courses for other degree programs in the University. 
Each student, in consultation with a faculty adviser, should elect the mathematics options 
that are compatible with career objectives. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Elective 3 Electives 6 

English 101 , 102 6 Mathematics 326, 341 , 379 

Humanities and Fine Arts Core 6 (or 326, 341 , 378, 379) 9-12 

Laboratory Science 8-10 Minor 6 

Mathematics 278, 377 Science (to complete a total of 

(or 276, 277) 6-9 14 hrs.) 4-6 

Physical Education /I Social Science Core .J± 

31-36 31-36 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Electives 12-18 Electives 15-21 

Mathematics* 9 English 333 3 

Minor 6 Mathematics* 6 

Social Science Core .J> Minor .J> 

30-36 30-36 

TOTAL: 128 

•To be selected from MAT courses numbered 320, 370, 385 or above 400. but noi to include MAT 4 It). Ai 
least three of these courses must be numbered above 400. 



226/College of Science and Technology 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS 
WITH SECONDARY TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101 , 102 6 Biological Science** 6-8 

History 101, 102 or 140, 141 6 Educational Psychology 110 3 

Mathematics 278, 377 Fine Arts 3 

(or 276, 277) 6-9 Mathematics 326, 341 , 379, 

Physical Education 2 (or 326, 341 , 378, 379) 9-12 

Physical Science** 6-10 Research and Foundations 400 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Social Science Core ^3 

26-33 30-35 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 



Electives**** 6 Curriculum and Instruction: 

English 332, Literature 6 Secondary 313, 457, 487 15 

Educational Psychology 372, 374 6 Electives**** 6 

Health and Safety Education 101 3 Mathematics*** 6 

Mathematics*** 9 Research in Educational 

Social Science Core .J Foundations 469 ^3 

33 30 

TOTAL: 128 

**For the BS in the College of Science and Technology include fourteen hours of science, ai least eight of 
which must be laboratory science. 

***Must satisfy the mathematics major requirements * above, as well as the requirements for a Secondary 
Teacher's Certificate in Mathematics. Current secondary teacher certification requirements are available in the 
Mathematics Department. 

****Students who will graduate after September I, 1981, will also be required to take Curriculum and Instruc- 
tion - Secondary (CIS) 310, 422, and SPE 400 for secondary teacher certification. 

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR MATHEMATICS AS A MINOR 

MAT 276, 277, 378, 379 or MAT 278, 377, 379 12 

MAT 326, 341 6 

One or more MAT courses numbered 320, 370, 385 or above 

400 other than MAT 410 3 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Shirley McManigal, Chairman 

Brundage, R. Crews, T. Crews, D. Fowler, 

Harwell, Hudson, Owen 

Forrest General Hospital: R. Cooke, Warren 

Hinds General Hospital: Ferguson, Henderson 

Memorial Hospital at Gulfport: Atchison, Tucker 

Singing River Hospital: Barrett, Dore 

Gulf Coast Community Hospital: Krecker, Monroe, Rehak 

COMMON REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

A student majoring in the Department of Medical Technology must complete courses 
outlined for the freshman, sophomore, and junior years. During the junior year, the stu- 



Medical Technology/227 

dent will apply to the department for admission into the senior year. The fourth year con- 
sists of two phases: Phase I, a six-month didactic session on the University of Southern 
Mississippi campus; and Phase II, a six-month clinical session at one of the affiliated 
hospitals. Affiliated hospitals are: Memorial Hospital, Gulfport; Forrest County General 
Hospital, Hattiesburg; Singing River Hospital, Pascagoula; Hinds General Hospital, 
Jackson; and Gulf Coast Community Hospital, Biloxi. 

Two senior classes are accepted each year, one in July and one in January. 

The Department of Medical Technology is accredited by the Committee on Allied 
Health and Accreditation of the American Medical Association and the National Ac- 
crediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Upon successful completion of the pro- 
gram, students receive the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology and become 
eligible to take national certifying examinations given by recognized certifying agencies. 
For information on the Master of Science degree, please consult the Graduate Bulletin. 

Hours 

General Core for the College of Science and Technology 35 

Professional Requirements 

Biology 220, 221,424 12 

Chemistry 101, 102, 251, 252, 31 1, 321 25 

Genetics 45 1 3 

Microbiology 101 , 41 1 , 441 12 

Medical Technology 101 , 302, 306, 309, 400, 401 , 402, 403, 404, 405, 
406, 407, 408, 409, 410, 41 1 , 412, 45 1 , 452, 455, 
456, 457, 458, 459 66 

Elective 3 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. HRS. 



Biology 220, 220L; 

221, 221L 

Chemistry 101, 101L 

102, 102L 

English 101, 102 

Mathematics 101, 103 . . 
Medical Technology 101 
Physical Education 



6 

6 

1 

1 

Social Science Core* 6 



36 



Chemistry 251, 25 1L; 

252, 252L; 311, 311L 13 

English 333 3 

Genetics 45 1 3 

History, philosophy, 

religion, foreign language, 

or allied arts 6 

Microbiology 101, 101L 4 

Physical Education 1 

Social Science Core* ^_3 

33 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. SENIOR YEAR 

Biology 424, 424L 4 Phase I 

Chemistry 321, 321 L 4 Medical Technology 

Elective 3 401 , 402, 403, 404, 405, 

Mathematics 314 3 406, 407, 408, 409, 410, 

Microbiology 411, 411L; 411, 412 

441, 441 L 8 Phase II 

Medical Technology Medical Technology 
302, 302L, 306, 306L; 451, 452, 455, 456, 

309, 309L, 400 \3 457, 458, 459 

35 



SEM. HRS. 



34 



•Total of nine hours from the following areas, wiih no more than three hours from any one area: 
thropology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, or sociology. 



228/College of Science and Technology 

DEPARTMENT OF MICROBIOLOGY 

Peter K. Stocks, Chairman 
Ellender, Middlebrooks, Peebles, Stoddard, Torrey, Yarbrough 

The Department of Microbiology offers programs of study leading to the degrees of 
the Bachelor of Science, the Master of Science, the Doctor of Philosophy. For information 
on the master's and the Doctor of Philosophy programs, please consult the Graduate 
Bulletin. 

The Department of Microbiology is designed to prepare students for careers in medical 
and industrial (applied) microbiology, food science and technology, and genetics. Current 
course offerings provide for an undergraduate major in microbiology and food science and 
technology, or a minor in genetics. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MICROBIOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 101, 101L, 102, 102L 8 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities and Fine Arts Core 6 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Microbiology 101, 101 L 4 

Physical Education/ROTC A 

31 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 333 3 

Chemistry 351, 351L, 352, 352L 8 

Mathematics 314* 3 

Microbiology 301*, 301L*, 411, 411L..8 

Physics 101, 101L, 102, 102L 8 

Social Science Core ^6 

36 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 421 , 422 6 

Computer Science 211, 212 6 

Genetics 402*, 403**, 404L* 8 

Microbiology 421**. 421 L**, 441, 441L, 

455**, 455L** 12 

Physical Education/ROTC 1 

Social Science Core ^ 

36 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 448*, 448L*, 449*, 449L* 4 

Chemistry 451*, 451L* 4 

Electives 3 

Genetics 461**, 461L** 4 

Microbiology 422**, 422L**, 461**, 
461L**, 471**,471L** 12 



TOTAL: 



27 
130 



•Alternate courses may be substituted at the discretion of the adviser. 
••Courses taught in alternate years or as needed by the department to fulfill student demand. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 101, 101L, 102, 102L 8 

Chemistry 101, 101L, 102, 102L 8 

English 101, 102 6 

Food Science 101 3 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Physical Education /I 

33 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 311*, 31 1L* 5 

English 333 3 

Food and Nutrition 362 3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 351, 351L, 352, 352L 8 

Food Science 310, 489 4 

Humanities and Fine Arts Core 6 

Mathematics 314* 3 

Microbiology 101, 101 L 4 

Social Science Core .J> 

31 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 42 1 * 3 

Computer Science 211* 3 

Electives 8 



Physics and Astronomy/229 

Food Science 3 50, 3 50L, 4 10, 489 8 Food Science 450, 450L, 451, 45 1L, 489 . . .9 

Genetics402 3 Microbiology 471, 47 1L 4 

Microbiology 461, 46 1L 4 Social Science Core 3 

Physics 101 , 101L, 102, 102L J 

34 30 

TOTAL: 128 

Recommended electives include: Psychology 1 10; Economics 200; Marketing 300; Management 350, 454; Genetics 
421; Chemistry 422, 427, 428; Microbiology 411, 41 1L. 

•Alternate courses may be substituted at the discretion of the adviser. 



INSTITUTE OF GENETICS 

Karen M. Yarbrough, Director 

Peebles, Stoddard 

The Institute of Genetics participates in programs leading to the Master of Science and 

the Doctor of Philosophy degrees through the Department of Microbiology. Information 

on these programs may be obtained from the Graduate Bulletin. The Institute of Genetics 

also offers a minor in genetics at the bachelor's level. 

A minimum of eighteen (18) semester hours is required which should include GEN 402, 
403, and 45 1 . The remainder of the program is to be selected with the approval of the Direc- 
tor of the Institute of Genetics. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND 
ASTRONOMY 

William E. Hughes, Chairman 
Folse, Rayborn, Rusk, Suggs 

The primary objectives of the Department of Physics are to provide students with suf- 
ficient basic information and technical skills in the various areas of physics so that they may 
be qualified to serve as teachers in secondary school, serve as physicists in government or 
industry, or pursue professional work and graduate study in physics. 

The department offers programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in 
Physics and the Master of Science degree in Physics. Information relating to the MS degree 
may be found in the Graduate Bulletin. 

Leaflets giving outlines of undergraduate programs that will meet all departmental and 
University requirements are available from the Physics Department office. Students plan- 
ning to major or minor in physics should obtain these leaflets as soon as possible. 

It is assumed that the high school mathematical preparation of entering freshman 
physics students includes algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PHYSICS 

SCHEDULE I 
FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 



English 101, 102 6 Chemistry 101, 101L, 102, 102L 8 

Mathematics276,277or278,377 6-9 Computer Science 240 3 

Physical Education or English333 3 

ROTC/AFROTC 2-3 HumanitiesCore 3 

Physics 101, 101L, 102, 102L,or 8-10 Mathematics378,379 6 

Physics201,201L,202,202L Physics341,341L,361,361L 8 

Social Studies Core ^6 Social Studies Core .J 

28-34 34 



230/ColIege of Science and Technology 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 340 3 

Mathematics 385, 415 6 

Physics 327, 327L, 328, 328L 21 

331, 331L, 332, 350, 351 _ 

30 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Humanities Core 3 

Mathematics Electives 6 

Physics 421, 422, 461, 462 12 

Science Electives ._9 

30 
TOTAL: 128 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PHYSICS 
SCHEDULE II 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Mathematics276,277or278,377 6-9 

Physical Education or 

ROTC/AFROTC 2-3 

Physics 101, 101L, 102, 102L,or 8-10 

Physics 201, 201 L, 202, 202L 

Social Studies Core ^6 

28-34 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 340 3 

Humanities Core 3 

Mathematics 385, 415 6 

Physics 341, 341L, 421, 422, 16 

Physics 461, 462 

Social Studies Core ._3 

31 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Computer Science 240 3 

English333 3 

Humanities Core 3 

Mathematics378,379 6 

Physics327,327L,328,328L 19 

Physics331, 331 L, 332,361, 361L 

34 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 101, 101L, 102, 102L 8 

Mathematics Electives 9 

Physics 350, 351 6 

Physics Elective 3 

Science Electives 9 



TOTAL: 



35 
128-134 



DEPARTMENT OF POLYMER SCIENCE 

B. George Bufkin, Chairman 
Burks, Canfield, Hester, McCormick, Neidlinger, R. Seymour, Thames, Wildman 
The Department of Polymer Science offers programs of study leading to the degrees of 
the Bachelor of Science in Polymer Science, the Bachelor of Science in Plastics Technology, 
the Master of Science in Polymer Science, and the Doctor of Philosophy in Polymer 
Science. For information concerning the master's and Doctor of Philosophy degree, see the 
Graduate Bulletin. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN POLYMER SCIENCE 

The objective of this curriculum is to prepare the graduate to enter the industrial com- 
munity or to continue his studies at the graduate level. The Bachelor of Science in Polymer 
Science constitutes an interdisciplinary program of study and, therefore, no minor is re- 
quired. 



Polymer Science/23 1 
REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN POLYMER SCIENCE 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 101, 101L 

102, 102L 8 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities And Fine Arts Core 6 

Mathematics 103, 278 8 

Physical Education/ROTC 2 

Polymer Science 191 2 

Social Science Core ^_3 

35 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 351, 351L, 

352, 352L 9 

Mathematics 377, 379 7 

Physics 201, 201 L, 202, 

202L 10 

Polymer Science 291 2 

Social Science Core 6 



34 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 311, 31 1L 5 

Computer Science 240 3 

Elective 3 

Mathematics 385 3 

Polymer Science 301, 301 L, 

302, 302L 8 

Polymer Science 360, 361, 

361L JS 

30 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Electives 7 

English 333 3 

Polymer Science 401, 401 L, 

402, 402L 8 

Polymer Science 470, 470L 5 

Polymer Science 480 3 

Polymer Science 490, 490L, 

491, 491L ^8 

34 
TOTAL: 133 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PLASTICS TECHNOLOGY 

The Plastics Technology curriculum is designed to prepare the student to enter the 
rapidly expanding plastics industry. A plastics technology major will complete a minimum 
of forty-two (42) semester hours in the major field. No minor is required. Each student will 
be assigned an adviser to plan the proper course sequence within the student's interest. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PLASTICS TECHNOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 101, 101L, 102, 

102L 8 

English 101, 102 6 

Humanities And Fine Arts 

Core 6 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Physical Education 2 

Polymer Science 191 2 

Social Science Core ^ 

33 

JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 311, 31 1L 5 

Computer Science 240 3 

Mathematics 385 3 

Polymer Science 301, 301 L, 

302, 302L 8 

Polymer Science 310 1 

Polymer Science 350 3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 351, 351L, 

352, 352L 9 

Mathematics 278, 377 9 

Physics 201, 201 L, 202, 

202L 10 

Polymer Science 291 2 

Social Science Core 6 



36 
SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Electives 6 

English 333 3 

Polymer Science 401, 401 L, 

402, 402L 8 

Polymer Science 460, 460L, 

461, 461L 8 

Polymer Science 470, 470L 5 



232/College of Science and Technology 

Polymer Science 360, 361, Polymer Science 480 3 

361 L 8 Polymer Science 490, 490L 4 

Polymer Science 430 ._3 

34 37 

TOTAL: 140 



DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Including Fundamentals of Science 

Bobby N. Irby, Chairman 

Bellipanni, F. Brown, I. Brown, Cotten, Dale, 

Matthews, Milkent, J.R. Moore, Sonnier, Story 

The Department of Science Education is operated jointly by the College of Science and 
Technology and the College of Education and Psychology. The facilities are in the College 
of Science and Technology. Programs in teacher-education are in the College of Education 
and Psychology. Responsibility for the curriculum is shared jointly. Graduate programs are 
described in the Graduate Bulletin. 



Objectives 

The objectives of the Department of Science Education are: (1) to provide those 
courses in both the physical and biological sciences which would give a minimum degree of 
scientific literacy to all students; (2) to provide, in cooperation with the Department of Cur- 
riculum and Instruction, a curriculum in the sciences and science methods for elementary 
school teachers; (3) to provide programs for those students planning to teach the sciences at 
the secondary school level; (4) to provide programs leading to advanced degrees in science 
education; and, (5) to work with public schools in the development of curricula, 
workshops, science fairs, and other activities designed to improve science instruction at all 
public school levels. 



Curriculum and Programs 

The Department of Science Education is primarily concerned with teachers and pro- 
spective teachers of science. Although some students will be planning to teach a specific- 
science discipline, current public school organization encourages diversification of training 
in the sciences for prospective science teachers. Therefore, familiarity with principles and 
concepts common to all the scientific disciplines should be a prerequisite for teacher train- 
ing programs in science education. Hence, programs in science education are so organized 
as to give teachers and prospective teachers a broad understanding of several sciences, with 
the opportunity for enough specialization in one area to pursue advanced study. 

All prospective science teachers at the junior and senior high school levels are expected 
to complete introductory courses in the four basic science areas — biology, chemistry, 
geology, and physics. One year of college mathematics is also required. With few excep- 
tions, the first mathematics course would deal with analytical geometry. 

Specialization in a particular science, depending upon the area, requires from twenty- 
three (23) to twenty-nine (29) semester hours credit in that area. Upon completion of the 
undergraduate program, the student would be certified to teach one or more specific 
sciences and general science. A general outline of the program is given below: 



Science/233 
REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN SCIENCE EDUCATION 
Biology Specialty 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 

Biology 101, 102 8 

English 101, 102 6 

History 101 , 102, or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Political Science 101 3 



32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology 202 4 

Chemistry 101 , 102 8 

Fundamentals of Science 104 3 

Mathematics 314 3 

Microbiology 101 4 

Physical Education 2 

Psychology 110 3 

Research and Foundations 300, 469 ^6 

33 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Biology Electives (above 300) 9 

Chemistry 25 1 4 

Educational Psychology 372, 

374 6 

English 332 3 

Genetics 402 3 

Health & Safety Education 101 3 

Science Education 454 .3 

31 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum & Instruction 456, 

313, 486 15 

English 200, 201, 202, or 404 3 

Free Elective 1 

Geology 101 4 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Science Education 470 3 

Sociology 101 .3 

32 
TOTAL: 128 



Chemistry Specialty 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 

Chemistry 101 , 102 8 

English 101, 102 6 

History 101, 102, or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Political Science 101 3 



32 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 311, 321 9 

Educational Psychology 372, 

374 6 

English 200, 201, 202, or 404 3 

Health & Safety Education 101 3 

Mathematics 314 3 

One Free Elective 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Science Education 455 .JS 

33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry 351, 352 9 

Fundamentals of Science 104, 

106, 107 9 

Geology 101 4 

Physical Education 2 

Psychology 101 3 

Research & Foundations 300 3 

Sociology 101 ._3 

33 

SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Chemistry Elective (300, 400) 4 

Curriculum & Instruction 456, 

313, 486 15 

English 332 3 

One Free Elective 2 

Research & Foundations 469 3 

Science Education 471 3 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



234/College of Science and Technology 

Earth Science Specialty 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 101, 102 6 

Fundamentals of Science 104 3 

Geology 101 4 

Health & Safety Education 101 3 

History 101 , 102, or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Physical Education 2 

Political Science 101 3 



33 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 

Fundamentals of Science 105, 106, 

107 9 

Geography 323 3 

Geology 103 4 

Mathematics 314 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Research & Foundations 300 3 

Sociology 101 jj 

31 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Astronomy 311, 312 8 

Educational Psychology 372 3 

English 200, 201 , 202, or 404 3 

English 332 3 

Geography 324, 325 6 

One Geography Elective 3 

Research & Foundations 469 3 

Science Education 453 ^3 

32 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum & Instruction 456, 

313, 486 15 

Educational Psychology 374 3 

Free Elective 4 

Geology 341 4 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Science Education Elective 3 



TOTAL: 



32 
128 



Physics Specialty 



FRESHMAN YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Allied Arts 100 3 

English 101, 102 6 

Fundamentals of Science 105, 

106 6 

History 101, 102, or 140, 141 6 

Mathematics 101 , 103 6 

Physical Education 2 

Political Science 101 ^ 

32 



SOPHOMORE YEAR SEM. HRS. 

English 200, 201 , 202, or 404 3 

Fundamentals of Science 107 3 

Mathematics 3 1 4, 276 6 

Physics 101, 102 8 

Psychology 110 3 

Speech Communication 111 3 

Research & Foundations 300 3 

Sociology 101 ^3 

32 



JUNIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Educational Psychology 372, 

374 6 

Geology 101 4 

Health & Safety Education 101 3 

One Free Elective 3 

Physics Electives (300, 400) 4 

Physics 361 , 292, or 106 8 

Research & Foundations 469 3 

Science Education 455 ^3 

34 



SENIOR YEAR SEM. HRS. 

Curriculum & Instruction 456, 

313, 486 15 

English 332 3 

Physics Elective (300, 400) 4 

Science Education 472 3 

Two Free Electives 5 



30 
TOTAL: 128 



Science/235 

The scope of the science education program and the fact that many courses run in se- 
quence and are offered at particular times of the year necessitate careful and frequent ad- 
visement of students. It cannot be over-emphasized that students should consult with their 
assigned adviser each semester. Failure to do so will most often result in unnecessary delays 
and hardships in completing the program. 

The above program provides a broad background and some depth in all science areas, 
gives the prospective teacher an opportunity for considerable depth and specialization in 
one science area, and requires the necessary background courses in professional education 
for effective teaching. 

Students in the College of Science and Technology and in the College of Education and 
Psychology can major in science education and minor in secondary education. The pro- 
gram as outlined above for science teachers meets the certification requirements in all states 
in the areas of biology, chemistry, physics, earth science, general science, and physical 
science. 



FUNDAMENTALS OF SCIENCE 

Fundamentals of Science: Two courses in general physical science and two courses in 
general biological science of three semester hours credit for each. These courses are design- 
ed to give the non-science major an acquaintance and understanding of certain fundamen- 
tal principles of the major science disciplines. 

Inasmuch as there is overlapping and duplication in these courses and those offered by 
various other science departments, the student should read carefully the limitations for 
each of the Fundaments of Science courses. Any questions should be answered by the stu- 
dent's adviser and/or the Department of Science Education prior to enrolling in these 
courses since they may be taken in any sequence the student chooses. 

The FS 130 series is designed for elementary education and special education majors. 
These courses are sequential and they should be taken in numerical order. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI- 
GULF COAST 

Joe E. Holloway, Dean 

G. Bullard, Burch, H. Daniel, Eickemeyer, Elias, Gardner, Gjestland, 

B. Lee, Manly, Markwalder, Masztal, Ozerden, Pantin, L. Phillips, Poulos, 

J. Reeves, B.E. Smith, L.G. Thomas, C. Thompson, Wallace, Wilder 

The University of Southern Mississippi Gulf Coast serves students at three locations: 
the Gulf Park Campus in Long Beach, the Keesler Center on Keesler Air Force Base, and 
USM Jackson County Center located on the Jackson County Campus of the Mississippi 
Gulf Coast Junior College District in Gautier. USM Gulf Coast is a part of a cooperative 
plan to provide comprehensive higher education on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. While local 
junior colleges administer programs at the lower division level, USM Gulf Coast offers up- 
per division and graduate level instruction to commuting students who wish to pursue their 
higher education goals at a pace of nine semester hours or less per term. 

The Two-Plus-Two articulation agreement with the Mississippi Gulf Coast Junior Col- 
lege District and Pearl River Junior College assures a smooth transition for students who 
transfer from the junior college's freshman-sophomore programs to the upper level pro- 
grams at USM Gulf Coast. In order to take full advantage of the articulation and other 
benefits of the Two-Plus-Two agreement, the junior college student should initiate a Two- 
Plus-Two Pre-Admission Application (available from USM Gulf Coast or one of the cam- 
puses of the junior colleges) as soon as the student has decided upon a major area of study. 

USM Gulf Coast enables the University of Southern Mississippi to bring its courses 
and programs to residents of the Mississippi Gulf Coast. All USM Gulf Coast courses and 
programs are offered through the appropriate departments and colleges on the Hattiesburg 
Campus. Accordingly, most of the policies governing USM Gulf Coast undergraduate pro- 
grams are identical with those stated elsewhere in this Bulletin. Information unique to the 
Regional Campus undergraduate programs is outlined below. 



SCOPE 

USM Gulf Coast provides a flexible delivery system designed to meet the educational 
needs of Coast citizens. Consequently, new courses and programs are added as student de- 
mand warrants and resources permit. A sufficient number of courses are now available so 
that USM Gulf Coast students may earn their entire baccalaureate degree(s) with majors in 
the following areas: Business Administration, Business Administration with Real Estate 
emphasis, Computer Science, Computer Science-Data Processing, Computer Technology, 
Criminal Justice, Elementary Education, English, History, Industrial Technology with 
Electronics emphasis, Industrial Technology with Manufacturing emphasis, Industrial and 
Vocational Education with Post-Secondary Certification emphasis, Industrial and Voca- 
tional Education with Secondary Certification emphasis, Mathematics, Psychology, 
Paralegal Studies, Political Science, Secondary Education, Social Studies, and Special 
Education. As the scope of the USM Gulf Coast program broadens in response to student 
demand, majors in other areas will become available. In addition to these degree comple- 
tion programs, students can obtain a substantial amount of their baccalaureate degree re- 
quirement in other majors offered by the University of Southern Mississippi parent cam- 
pus. Prospective students are invited to contact a USM Gulf Coast adviser in order to 
discuss course availability in their area of special interest. 



Accreditation 

As an integral division of the University of Southern Mississippi, USM Gulf Coast is 
accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools— Commission on Colleges 
and by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. 



USM— Gulf Coast/237 



Admission 



In keeping with the status of USM Gulf Coast as an upper-level institution, regular ad- 
mission is open to students who have attained junior standing (54 semester hours). The 
USM Gulf Coast Dean can authorize special exceptions to this rule for persons who need a 
limited number of courses for specialized professional and/or cultural development. In 
other respects, admission requirements are identical with those outlined elsewhere in this 
Bulletin. In order to facilitate proper advisement and predetermination of admission status, 
students should furnish transcripts and complete applications for admission at least twenty 
days prior to registration. Students who are unable to meet this deadline may be provi- 
sionally admitted at registration. Transcripts of provisional students must be received by 
the middle of the term in which they register. The University is in no way committed to con- 
tinue enrollment, refund fees or tuition payments, grant grades, or otherwise award any 
credit if all of the required admission forms are not received on time or if the provisional 
student is found to be ineligible for admission. Transcripts and the complete applications 
should be sent to the Director of Student Services, USM Gulf Coast, Long Beach, MS 
39560. 

Course Load 

Students are permitted to carry a total of nine (9) semester hours per term through 
USM Gulf Coast. Credit workshops taken on the Regional Campus will be counted as part 
of the nine-hour load. 



Honors 

Special policies have been formulated in order to accord official recognition to 
students who achieve outstanding academic records. Dean's List: Students will be placed on 
the quarterly USM Gulf Coast Dean's List if they attain a quality point ratio of 3.25 or 
above on an academic load of not less than six (6) semester hours. Degrees with Honors: 
USM Gulf Coast students with exceptional academic records may be awarded a degree with 
honors or with highest honors. The residence requirements for such degrees is not less than 
five (5) terms with a load of not less than six (6) semester hours of credit each term and 
totaling not less than fifty-four (54) semester hours of credit with the University of 
Southern Mississippi. A degree with honors will be granted to a student who maintains a 
quality-point average of 3.5 or more. A degree with highest honors will be granted to a stu- 
dent who maintains a quality-point average of 3.8 or more. 



Fees 

All USM Gulf Coast student fees are assessed in accordance with the University's part- 
time student fee schedule quoted elsewhere in this Bulletin. Students who enroll concurrent- 
ly at USM Hattiesburg and USM Gulf Coast must pay separate fees for the USM Gulf 
Coast courses. 

CALENDAR 

USM Gulf Coast offers four terms per year. Holidays follow the same schedule as the 
Hattiesburg Campus Calendar found elsewhere in this Bulletin. 

TERM REGISTRATION 

Fall 1980-81 Aug. 26-27, 1980 

Winter 1980-81 Nov. 11-12, 1980 

Spring 1980-81 Feb. 17-18, 1 98 1 

Summer 1980-81 June2-3.I981 



238/USM— Gulf Coast 



SPECIAL DECREE PROGRAM 



The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Business Administration is awarded 
through the University of Southern Mississippi Gulf Coast. 



Basic Curriculum Outside Business Administration 

The business administration graduate, though career oriented, must work and live in a 
changing society which will continually offer him personal and business challenges. 
Business and industry leaders must have a background which makes them cognizant of the 
past, articulate in many subjects, and adaptable to change. Therefore, the following 
courses from the arts and sciences have been selected for the purpose of providing the 
business administration student with a broad perspective and foundation upon which one 
can build one's knowledge of basic business tools and specialized subjects. 

It may be observed that the courses below include primarily those at the 
freshman/sophomore level. Unless advised to the contrary, the student may choose to 
substitute certain junior and senior level courses offered on the Gulf Coast if they are of 
particular interest. 

Hours 

English 101, 102 — Freshman English 6 

Social Science— Geography or political science 3 

History— HIS 101, 102; 140, 141 (or advanced courses) 6 

Mathematics 101 , 112 (College algebra and applied algebra) 6 

Speech Communication 1 1 1 (or advanced course) 3 

Science (Biology, chemistry, fundamentals, geology, physics) 6 

Humanities (Literature, allied arts, philosophy, foreign 

language, religion) 9 

Behavioral Science (Anthropology, psychology, sociology) 6 

Mathematics or science elective (MAT 3 1 2 recommended) 3 

Elective (Behavioral science, computer science, social science 

or math) 3 

Physical Education, ROTC/AFROTC, or approved substitute ^.i^_9_ r _l 

53 or 54 



Basic Business Core Curriculum for Business Administration Majors 

The business courses listed below are required of all students majoring in Business Ad- 
ministration. These courses should provide the student with the basic tools which are need- 
ed for advanced courses as well as a broad understanding of the entire area of business and 
of the economy in which business and industry operate. Only those courses numbered 300 
and above are offered on the Gulf Coast. 

Hours 

ACC 201 , 202— Principles of Accounting I and II 6 

ECO 225, 256— Principles of Economics I and II 6 

GBA 290— Fundamentals of FORTRAN (or approved substitute: 

CSS 240, 342) 3 

GBA 295— Legal Environment of Business 3 

ACC 300— Administrative Accounting 3 

MKT 300— Principles of Marketing 3 

ECO 301 , 302— Elementary Statistics I and II 6 

ECO 330— Money and Public Policy 3 

MGT 360— Fundamentals of Management 3 

FIN 389— Business Finance 3 

MGT 485— Administrative Policy ^3 

42 



USM— Gulf Coast/239 

Major Requirements 

In the major field, the student must choose courses from several areas of business ad- 
ministration. These may be chosen from the variety of courses listed below. This list will 
serve as a guide in selecting those subjects which are of interest and which best suit one's 
purpose. 

Hours 

Major Requirements as listed below 27 

Economics and General Business Administration 6 

ECO 335 — Economics of the Firm 
ECO 401— Public Finance 
GBA 31 1— Advanced Business Law 
*GBA 375— Managerial Communications 
GBA 415 — Government and Business 

Finance, Real Estate, and Insurance 6 

FIN 320— Personal Finance 
FIN 350— Bank Administration 
FIN 355 — Problems in Bank Administration 
FIN 352— Principles of Investment 
*FIN 480— Financial Management 
REI 325 — General Insurance 
REI 330— Real Estate Principles 
REI 334— Residential and Rural Valuation 
REI 340— Real Estate Law 
REI 345— Property Management 
REI 432— Real Estate Finance 

Management and Marketing 9 

*MGT 364 — Personnel Management 
MGT 386 — Safety Management 
MGT 454 — Human Relations 
MGT 455 — Behavioral Issues in Organizations 
MGT 464— Work Methods & Performance Standards 
MGT 465 — Production & Operations Management 
MGT 472— Labor Relations 
MGT 484 — Problems in Personnel Administration 
MKT 330— Salesmanship 
MKT 342 — Principles of Retailing 
MKT 365 — Consumer Behavior 
*MKT428 — Marketing Management 

Business electives from any area above 6 

"Required Courses 

Free Electives 0-6 

Total hours required for graduation 128 or 129 

NOTE: The student may select, as elective credit, one or more upper level accounting 
courses offered on the Gulf Coast. 

**ACC 301 — Intermediate Accounting I 
ACC 302— Intermediate Accounting II 
ACC 320— Cost Accounting 
ACC 330— Federal Income Tax Accounting I 



•Students electing 10 lake ACC 301 may not take ACC 300 in the business administration core for credit. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN 
MISSISSIPPI-NATCHEZ 

Billy W. Gore, Dean 

L. Bowers, Carriere, Gibson, Harris, Hensley, 

Lindecamp, Lunan, Parks, Presley, Welsh 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The University of Southern Mississippi offers at its Natchez Campus the Bachelor of 
Science degree with a major in Elementary Education; the Bachelor of Science or a 
Bachelor of Arts with majors in English, History, Mathematics, Criminal Justice, or 
Political Science; the Bachelor of Science degree in Secondary Education with majors in 
Social Studies, History, Political Science, English, Mathematics, Business Education, 
Library Science, or Psychology. Additionally, master's degrees are offered in Elementary 
Education, Reading, Secondary Education, Special Education, Educational Administra- 
tion. All of the above degree programs are offered through the respective departments at 
USM-Hattiesburg with coordinators, advisers, professional staff, and classes available on a 
continuing basis at the USM-Natchez Campus. 

With the exception of the residence hour requirements, degree programs at USM- 
Natchez follow regulations and curricular outlines found in the appropriate sections of the 
Bulletin. 

In addition to the degree programs above, the University of Southern Mississippi- 
Natchez offers the Master of Science in Management. This program is offered by the 
University at the Natchez Campus only. A description of the Bachelor of Science in 
Business Administration degree will follow later in this Bulletin. A description of the 
Master of Science in Management may be found in the USM-Natchez section of the 
Graduate Bulletin. 

Admission 

Since the University of Southern Mississippi-Natchez is an upper level and graduate in- 
stitution, admission to degree programs is open to students who have attained junior stan- 
ding. However, students who have not attained junior standing and meet other re- 
quirements for admission to the University may be admitted on a per course basis as special 
students. In other respects, admission requirements are identical with those outlined earlier 
in this Bulletin. Transcripts and completed applications should be sent to the Director of 
Admissions and Records, USM-Natchez, Natchez, MS 39120. 

Course Load 

Undergraduate students may enroll at USM-Natchez for a maximum of nine (9) 
semester hours per quarter. 

Residence Requirements 

The following regulations are residence requirements for USM-Natchez; 

1. At least thirty-two (32) semester hours of credit must be earned at one, or a com- 
bination of, the University's three degree-granting campuses; 

2. At least nine (9) of these thirty-two hours must be earned in the student's major 
field; 

3. At least sixteen (16) of these thirty-two hours (exclusive of student teaching) must 
be taken at the USM-Natchez Campus. 

Honors 

Dean's List: Students will be placed on the quarterly USM-Natchez Dean's List if they 
attain a quality point ratio of 3.25 or above on an academic load of not less than six (6) 
semester hours. 



Business Administration, Natchez/241 

Degrees with Honors: Students with exceptional academic records may be awarded degrees 
with honors or with highest honors. The residence requirements for such degrees is not less 
than five (5) quarters with a load of not less than six (6) semester hours of credit each 
quarter and totaling not less than fifty-four (54) semester hours of credit with the Universi- 
ty of Southern Mississippi. A degree with honors will be granted to a student who maintains 
a quality-point average of 3.5 or more. A degree with highest honors will be granted to a 
student who maintains a quality-point average of 3.8 or more. 

Supporting Programs 

In addition to offering degree programs in the areas mentioned above USM-Natchez 
regularly schedules courses in support of many degrees offered only through the Hat- 
tiesburg campus, thereby enabling a student to earn a portion of his degree requirements 
locally. 

Advisement 

For the student's own protection, it is imperative that all program planning be ac- 
complished in consultation with official advisers. A student pursuing a degree at USM- 
Natchez should consult with the departmental coordinator who is in charge of that degree 
program. Students pursuing degrees at the USM-Hattiesburg campus should consult with a 
professional adviser in their respective degree areas on that campus. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

(with the major in Business Administration) 

Lindecamp and Parks, Coordinators 
The degree of Bachelor of Science with the major in Business Administration is award- 
ed by the University of Southern Mississippi, Natchez. Students are prepared to perform 
proficiently in beginning level managerial jobs, to think critically through problems that the 
beginning business manager will confront, and to contribute to society as productive, in- 
formed citizens. 

Purposes 

American society is increasingly aware of the growing need for managerial skills. The 
Bachelor of Science with the major in Business Administration is designed to prepare com- 
petent managers for business, government, and other non-profit organizations. To adapt 
himself to the technological and organizational changes which he will inevitably confront as 
a manager, the student is taught to think critically and analytically. He is prepared not only 
for proficiency as a beginning manager, but for professional growth and increasing com- 
petence throughout his career. Courses taken in liberal arts and scientific disciplines further 
prepare the student for his role as productive citizen by creating an appreciation for the 
enriching, cultural aspects of daily living. 



Accreditation 

The Bachelor of Science with the major in Business Administration is, as are all other 
programs of the University of Southern Mississippi-Natchez, operated under the auspices 
of the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 



Student Advisement 

The Departmental Coordinators in Business Administration are responsible for the 
academic advisement of students. 



242/USM— Natchez 



Expenses 



Tuition is the same for Business Administration students as for all other students at 
USM-Natchez. 

Business Administration courses at the University of Southern Mississippi-Natchez are 
limited to upper division and graduate courses. These are offered to commuting students of 
the Natchez region. Because of this limitation, the freshman and sophomore years' work 
must be completed elsewhere. (Offerings of the Copiah-Lincoln Junior College's Natchez 
campus will fill this need.) The required freshman and sophomore level courses, which 
must be completed elsewhere, are as follows: 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

ENG 101 , 102; ENG 351 ***or History Elective; ENG 370*** or History Elective; 

ENG 371 or History Elective 

MAT 101 ,112; MAT, BIO, CHE, or FS Elective 

BIO 101, 102 or FS 104, FS 105 

GBA 290 or CSS 240, GBA 295, 375 

PSY 110;SOC 101 

HSE101;SCM 111 

ACC 201, 202, 300 

ECO 255, 256, 301, 302, 330 

MGT 360; MGT 454 or GHY or PS Elective; MGT 364* or GHY or PS Elective; 485 

MKT 300, 428; FIN 389, 480 

ART 332, 337, 334, 335, or ENG 

***PED/ROTC/AFROTC (2 hours) 

ACC, ECO, FIN, GBA, REI, MGT or MKT electives to a total of 21 hours.*** 

♦Students should take either MGT 364 or MGT 454 
••Students should take either ENG 370 and 371 or ENG 350 and 351. 
•••Students should select one ECO elective; one FIN, GBA, or REI elective; one MKT elective; one MGT elective; a field 
emphasis of two courses from any of these fields or from ACC; and, one additional course from any of these fields. 



DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 
AND PUBLIC SERVICE 

Clyde N. Ginn, Dean 
Joseph E. Tinnon, Assistant Dean 
The Division of Continuing Education and Public Service enables the University to ex- 
tend its resources of knowledge, skills, and artistry to all who seek to profit from them. 
This is accomplished through the operation of the Departments of Independent Study, 
Conferences and Workshops, Community Service Programs, and Professional Develop- 
ment. In addition, courses are scheduled throughout the state which are designed to provide 
for the needs of individual populations. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Billy R. Folkes, Director 

The Department of Independent Study offers over one hundred courses which may be 
taken for University credit. These courses count for regular credit in the University and for 
approved credit on State Certificates for Teaching. As many as thirty-three (33) semester 
hours (no more than nine (9) in any one academic area) of the total 128 hour baccalaureate 
degree requirements may be earned in independent study courses, subject to the provisions 
outlined in detail in the Department of Independent Study 1979-1980 Bulletin. 

Independent study courses are particularly suited to the needs of the student who 
wishes to move at his own rate, and for the student who is unable to attend a university. 
These courses allow the student to earn credit through the advantages of home study. 

A complete high school curriculum is available through independent study, and 
courses are acceptable as entrance credits by the University. A High School Independent 
Study Catalog is available on request. 

The Counselor in the Department of Independent Study serves as the Statewide coor- 
dinator for The Great Decisions Program, sponsored nationally by the Foreign Policy 
Association. Great Decisions is an annual program of discussion among citizens meeting in- 
formally to discuss key foreign policy topics of critical importance to the United States. 

For further information, contact: 

Director, Department of Independent Study 
University of Southern Mississippi 
Southern Station, Box 5056 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401 



DEPARTMENT OF CONFERENCES AND WORKSHOPS 

William A. Bufkin, Director 

The Department of Conferences and Workshops has the responsibility of coordinating 
the administrative and logistical details for all credit and non-credit conferences, institutes, 
workshops, clinics, camps, and special training program activities, sponsored by the 
University. This department stands ready at all times to assist University departments, and 
educational, professional business, and industrial groups in setting up conferences, in- 
stitutes, workshops, or special training programs. 

Either academic credit or continuing eduction unit (c.e.u.) credit may be awarded for 
conference, institute, or workshop attendance, provided the activity is offered through an 
existing course number or is given prior approval by the appropriate University council. 
The number of contact hours necessary for a three semester hour credit activity is 
equivalent to the number of contact hours necessary for satisfactory completion of a 
regular on-campus course. Activities awarding graduate credit are required to conform to 
special credit policies established by the Graduate Council. 

Conveniently located and comfortable building facilities are available on or near the 
three University campuses and near the Universities' Center in Jackson for groups of any 
size. Meals and housing in air-conditioned facilities, all at nominal rates, are also available 



244/Division of Continuing Education and Public Service 

to individuals participating in both credit and non-credit programs at Hattiesburg and Gulf 
Park campuses. Additional conveniences include the location of motels, restaurants, shop- 
ping centers and recreational facilities within walking distance. 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 
AND WOMEN'S PROGRAMMING 

Janis James, Director 

The Department of Community Services is set up to aid individuals, both university 
and non-university, in tapping the resources of the University in noncredit programs. Non- 
credit special interest classes are organized on the University's campuses. The department 
also assists groups and organizations who request the use of University facilities for 
meetings or other special non-credit activities. Other services provided by this department 
include assisting outside organizations such as high schools, junior and senior colleges, 
civic organizations, etc., in obtaining University talent. This talent may take the form of 
speakers, dramatic and musical groups, and many of the other resources representative of 
the University. 

Another service being offered is the Listener's License program, whereby individuals 
may audit University courses on a non-credit basis without actively participating in the class 
and without being required to complete class requirements. 

Recently added to the departments offering is Women's Programming. These pro- 
grams are designed to meet the varied needs of today's woman. 



DEPARTMENT OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

Billy R. Folkes, Director 

The Department of Professional Development is charged with the responsibility of 
organizing and administering all regular courses taught off-campus in locations other than 
degree granting centers of Gulf Park and Natchez. Such courses fall into five categories:(l) 
courses that comprise in-service training programs for various school systems: (2) refresher 
courses for various professional and business areas; (3) special service programs; (4) travel 
credit programs; (5) CDA training for Head Start Agencies. The purpose of Professional 
Development is to offer additional educational opportunities to those individuals who have 
a desire to pursue particular studies apart from or beyond degree sequences and to those in- 
dividuals with professional skills that require updating and upgrading. 

The department coordinates foreign and domestic programs which may be for credit 
or non-credit. All credit courses and programs are approved by the respective academic 
department chairman prior to the start of the activity. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL PROGRAMS 

Donna J. Garvey, Coordinator 

The Department of Business and Industrial Programs has been established due to the 
increased number of requests from business and industry regarding in-service and other 
training programs. This department serves as a catalyst between business and industrial 
leaders and the University faculty and staff in developing successful training and other 
educational programs. Once the area of educational need has been determined, the Depart- 
ment will facilitate program development by working with appropriate university depart- 
ments. All financial and logistical details will be coordinated by the Department of Business 
and Industrial Programs. 

Hither academic credit or continuing education unit (c.e.u.) credit may be awarded for 
in-service or other training program attendance, provided the activity is offered through an 



USM— Jackson/245 

existing course number and is given prior approval by the appropriate University depart- 
ment or council. The number of contact hours necessary for a three semester hour activity 
is equivalent to the number of contact hours necessary for satisfactory completion of a 
regular on-campus course. Activities awarding graduate credit are required to conform to 
special credit policies established by the Graduate Council. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI-JACKSON 

Brantley Greeson, Coordinator 
The University offers courses at the Universities' Center in Jackson as part of a 
cooperative program with other state universities. For information about offerings write: 
USM-Jackson Division of Continuing Education 

The Universities' Center or and Public Service 

1855 Eastover Drive Southern Station, Box 5055 

Jackson, MS 3921 1 Hattiesburg, MS 39401 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Index of Abbreviations/247 



INDEX OF ABBREVIATIONS FOR FIELDS 
OF INSTRUCTION 



AA 


Allied Arts 


HHM 


Housing and Home 


AAC 


Athletic Administration 




Management 




and Coaching 


HIS 


History 


ACC 


Accounting 


HON 


Honors College 


ACT 


Architectural Technology 


HRA 


Hotel and Restaurant 


ADE 


Adult Education 




Administration 


AMS 


American Studies 


HSE 


Health and Safety Education 


ANT 


Anthropology 




see also Athletic Adminis- 


AOS 


Aerospace Studies 




tration and Coaching 


APM 


Applied Music 


HUM 


Humanities 


ARE 


Art Education 


IAD 


Institution Administration 


ART 


Art 


INT 


Industrial Technology 


AST 


Astronomy 


IVE 


Industrial and Vocational 


BCT 


Building Construction 




Education 




Technology 


JOU 


Journalism 


BED 


Business Education 


LS 


Library Science 


BIO 


Biology 


MAT 


Mathematics 


CD 


Child Development 


MED 


Music Education 


CHE 


Chemistry 


MET 


Mechanical Technology 


CI 


Curriculum and 


MFL 


Marriage and Family Life 




Instruction: 


MGT 


Management 




CIE Elementary 


MIC 


Microbiology 




CIS Secondary 


MKT 


Marketing 


CJ 


Criminal Justice 


MS 


Military Science 


CLT 


Comparative Literature 


MTC 


Medical Technology 


COM 


Communication 


MUS 


Music 


CPY 


Counseling Psychology 


NSG 


Nursing 


CSS 


Computer Science and 


PED 


Physical Education; see also 




Statistics 




Athletic Administration 


CT 


Clothing and Textiles 




and Coaching 


ECO 


Economics 


PHI 


Philosophy 


EDA 


Educational Administration 


PHY 


Physics 


ELT 


Electronics Technology 


PS 


Political Science 


ENG 


English 


PSC 


Polymer Science 


EPY 


Educational Psychology 


PSY 


Psychology 


ESC 


Environmental Technology 


REC 


Recreation 


EVD 


Environmental Design 


REF 


Research and Foundations 


FIN 


Finance 


REI 


Real Estate and Insurance 


FL 


Foreign Languages 


REL 


Religion 


FN 


Food and Nutrition 


RTF 


Radio-Television-Film 


FS 


Fundamentals of Science 


SCE 


Science Education 


FSC 


Forensic Science 


SCI 


Science 


FST 


Food Science and 


SCM 


Speech Communication 




Technology 


SHS 


Speech and Hearing Sciences 


GBA 


General Business 


SOC 


Sociology 




Administration 


SPE 


Special Education 


GEN 


Genetics 


SWK 


Social/Work 


GHY 


Geography 


THE 


Theatre Arts 


GLY 


Geology 


THY 


Therapy 


HEE 


Home Economics 
Education 







248/Course Descriptions 

EXPLANATION 

The semester credit hours are listed after the title of each course. 

Example: 

201. Principles of Accounting I. 3 hrs. An introduction to financial information 
systems. 

The courses marked (JC 1213) are those courses at USM which are equivalent to junior 
college courses. It should be noted that there is a variance in course sequence between the 
junior colleges and USM. In addition, courses with the same junior college numbers vary 
from college to college. An adviser should be consulted prior to course scheduling. 



ACCOUNTING (ACC— 605) 

201. Principles of Accounting I. 3 hrs. An introduction to financial information 
systems. (JC 1213, 1214) 

202. Principles of Accounting II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 201. A continuation of 
ACC 201. (JC 1223, 1224) 

300. Administrative Applications of Accounting. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 202. The 
use of financial information for administrative decision making within the firm. 

301. Intermediate Accounting I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 202. An intensive study of 
financial statement theory and preparation. 

302. Intermediate Accounting II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 301. A continuation of 
ACC 301. 

307. Fund Accounting. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ACC 302, 320. The study of govern- 
mental and fund accounting principles. 

320. Elementary Cost Accounting. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 202. A study of cost ac- 
counting systems and methods. 

330. Federal Income Tax Accounting I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 301. The legal en- 
vironment of business as affected by the federal income tax law and regulations. 

401. Advanced Accounting I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 302. A Continuation of 
ACC 302. 

402. Advanced Accounting II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 401 or consent of instruc- 
tor. A continuation of ACC 401 . 

405. Current Accounting Theory and Research. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 320, 402, 
409 or consent of instructor. A study of the accounting literature with emphasis on contem- 
porary problems. 

409 Auditing I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 302. An introduction to the financial state- 
ment attest function. 

410. Auditing II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 409. A continuation of ACC 409. 

420. Advanced Cost Accounting and Budgeting. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 320. A 
continuation of ACC 320 with emphasis on cost analysis for decision making. 

430. Federal Income Tax Accounting II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 330. A continua- 
tion of ACC 330. 

480. CPA Law Review. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GBA 311 and 24 hours of accounting 
beyond principles. 

492. Research in Accounting Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Senior Standing and 
consent of instructor. Individual research on an approved accounting topic. 



Aerospace Studies/249 

ADULT EDUCATION (ADE— 110) 

440. Methods and Materials in Adult Education. 3 hrs. Reviews the uses and adapta- 
tion of various materials and techniques for teaching adults. Relates content and methods. 

441. Foundations of Reading Instruction for the Adult. 3 hrs. Examines the basis of 
reading instruction in relation to the needs and characteristics of the non-literate adult. 

442. Methods and Materials for Teaching Adults to Read. 3 hrs. Materials, 
diagnostic and evaluative procedures, and laboratory experiences will be included. 

445. Teaching the Disadvantaged Adult. 3 hrs. Characteristics, needs, and problems 
are related to programs and procedures found to be successful. 

476. Learning in Adult Education. 3 hrs. A study of learning in adulthood, and 
related to a range of educational programs. 

490. Special Problems in Adult Education. 3 hrs. May be arranged for an individual 
or a group with common interests. Permission of the department chairman required. 

494. Student Teaching in Adult Education. 9 hrs. Prerequisite: CIA 440 or 441 or 

442 or IVE 431 or 435. For students who plan to teach in an adult education program or a 
postsecondary vocational center and who are not presently employed in such a program. 

495. Internship in Adult Education. 9 hrs. A nine-months, supervised experience for 
practicing teachers of adults. 



AEROSPACE STUDIES (AOS— 202) 

First-Year Aerospace Studies 

101. General Military Course. 2 hrs. A beginning course to introduce the student to 
the Air Force ROTC Program and the contemporary Air Force. Laboratory included. 

103. General Military Course. 2 hrs. Examines the functions and employment of 
U.S. General Purpose and U.S. Aerospace Forces. Laboratory included. 

Second-Year Aerospace Studies 

201 . The Developmental Growth of Air Power. 2 hrs. Events and personalities con- 
tributing to the development of air power as a primary element of national security. 
Laboratory included. 

203. The Developmental Growth of Air Power. 2 hrs. The changing mission of the 
defense establishment, emphasizing the impact of air power on strategic thought. 
Laboratory included. 

Third-Year Aerospace Studies 

312. Military Management Skills. 4 hrs. Compares the functions of the Air Force 
commander and his staff with contemporary management theory. Laboratory included. 

313. Military Leadership and Management. 4 hrs. Examines leadership and manage- 
ment roles of the junior Air Force officer. Includes communications security. Laboratory 
included. 

Fourth-Year Aerospace Studies. 

404. Flight Instruction Program. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: AOS 313 or permission of the 
instructor. Includes instruction in principles of flight, weather, and navigation. 

412 National Defense Forces in Contemporary American Society. 4 hrs. Focuses on 
the prerequisites for maintaining adequate national security forces. Laboratory included. 

413. National Defense Forces in Contemporary American Society. 4 hrs. Institu- 
tional structures involved in the formulation and implementation of U.S. Defense policies. 
Laboratory included. 

492. Special Projects. 1-4 hrs. 



250/Course Descriptions 



ALLIED ARTS (AA— 655) 



100. Introduction to the Arts. 3 hrs. An overview of the fine arts with examination, 
through team teaching, of the nature of musical, plastic, and theatrical art forms. (JC 1233) 



AMERICAN STUDIES (AMS— 204) 

304. Issues in America. 3 hrs. Topics vary according to professor and department in 
which the course is offered. May be repeated for credit if content varies. 

403. Seminar in American Studies. 3 hrs. Required of American Studies majors dur- 
ing senior year. Open to other majors with permission of professor. 

404. Issues in America. 3 hrs. Topics vary according to professor and department in 
which the course is offered. May be repeated for credit if content varies. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 



ANTHROPOLOGY (ANT— 286) 

101. Introduction to Anthropology. 3 hrs. A beginning course in anthropology 
stressing the origin and the evolution of man, culture, and society. (JC-ANT-2213) 

201. Physical Anthropology. 3 hrs. Origin and description of the diverse races of 
man. 

204. Introduction to Archeology. 3 hrs. Methods and findings of archeological 
research. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in a local "dig." 

212. Cultural Anthropology. 3 hrs. A comparative approach to the analysis of 
human cultural and social diversity. Includes an outline survey of world culture areas. (JC- 
SOC-2243) 

305. Human Osteology. 3 hrs. Applications of skeletal examination to forensic 
medicine, fossil man, diet, diseases, growth, and development of ancient man. 

310. Archeology of North America. 3 hrs. A study of the origin and development of 
prehistoric American Indian cultures, emphasizing the Southeastern United States. 

311. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology. 3 hrs. Origin and inter-relationship of 
the major languages of the world. 

312. Peoples and Cultures of Europe. 3 hrs. Ethnology of Europe and the adjacent 
North African and Middle Eastern territories. 

313. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. 3 hrs. An ethnological survey of the major 
culture areas of the African continent with particular reference to Sub-Saharan Africa. 

314. Peoples and Cultures of Asia. 3 hrs. Ethnological survey of Asia, Oceania, and 
Australasia. 

315. American Indian Cultures. 3 hrs. Ethnological survey of the Americas stressing 
pre-Columbian and North American Indian cultures. 

316. Biblical Archeology. 3 hrs. A survey of ancient Near Eastern peoples and 
cultures as reconstructed by anthropology and archeology. 

320. Urban Anthropology. 3 hrs. Origin, evolution, and problems of urban com- 
munities including a survey of the techniques employed by urban anthropologists. 

401. Primate Behavior. 3 hrs. Study of nonhuman Old and New World primates 
with regard to growth, behavior, social organization, and ecology. 

403. Prehistoric Archeology. 3 hrs. A survey of the archeology of the Old World. 

404. Mediterranean Archeology. 3 hrs. The archeology of complex societies with 
particular reference to the general area. 



Architectural Technology/251 

411. Foundations of Indo-European Thought and Culture. 3 hrs. A comparative ap- 
proach to the background of western culture, utilizing linguistics, mythology, and ar- 
cheology. 

412. Mythology and Folklore. 3 hrs. A survey of the major folklore traditions. 

413. History of Anthropological Theory. 3 hrs. A general survey of historical an- 
thropological thought and of the major contemporary schools of anthropological theory. 

414. Archeology Methods. 3 hrs. Methodology and techniques of archeological field 
work including participation in organized filed projects. 

420. Culture and Ethnicity. 3 hrs. An analysis of culture and ethnicity with special 
reference to the problem of modernization. 

425. Seminar in Anthropology. 3 hrs. Guided research and discussion for an- 
thropology majors. 

434. Primitive Religion. 3 hrs. Beliefs and ritual in primitive society. Relationship 
between magic and early religion. Animism, animatism, ghost-worship, and cults of death. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. A problem study to be approved by the department 
chairman. 

ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY (ACT— 392) 

132. Architectural Graphics. 3 hrs. Principles of orthographic projection and related 
drafting techniques applied to architectural and mechanical systems. 

204. Building Materials. 3 hrs. Properties, characteristics, and utilization of 
materials used in construction. 

221. Architectural Models. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 261. Introduction to materials 
and techniques used in architectural modeling. 

222. Architectural History. 3 hrs. Analysis of man's achievements in the design and 
construction of major architectural developments from early times to present. 

241. Statics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 133, PHY 105. Forces using vector notation; 
static equilibrium of rigid bodies, friction, centroids, and moment of inertia. 

261. Residential Planning and Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 204. Analysis and 
problem solutions in the design and planning of residential buildings. 

262. Architectural Design I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ACT 261. Design concepts and 
building types related to high density living areas. 

315. Mechanical Systems. 3 hrs. Design, installation, and performance of 
mechanical systems. 

316. Electrical Systems. 3 hrs. Design, installation, and performance of electrical 
equipment for residential and commercial buildings. 

323. Architectural Rendering. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ARE 207, ACT 132. Visual ex- 
pression of architectural principles and structures. Perspectives, shades, shadows, colors, 
etc. 

324. Architectural Landscaping. 3 hrs. Principles of landscaping as applied to the 
building environment. 

325. Office Practice. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 336. Preparation of contract 
documents, contract administration, and architectural office operations. 

326. Specifications. 2 hrs. Development and writing of architectural project 
specifications. 

338. Architectural Working Drawings. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 336. Emphasis on 
detailing, graphics, plan coordination and development of working drawings. 

342. Strength of Materials. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ACT 241, MAT 236. Stresses, 
strains, torsion, shear and moment in beams, bending, combining stresses, and columns. 



252/Course Descriptions 

363. Architectural Design II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 362. Design concepts and 
building types related to human work spaces and service facilities. 

364. Architectural Design III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 363. Design concepts and 
building types related to areas of public assembly and educational facilities. 

392. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of 
faculty adviser. 

400. Senior Project. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of faculty 
adviser. 

401. Senior Project. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of faculty 
adviser. 

417. Illumination and Acoustics. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 316. Study of architec- 
tural lighting systems, principles of acoustics and sound control in the design of buildings. 

443. Structural Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 342. Function and design of wood 
and steel structural components and systems. 

457. Architectural Estimating. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 354. Development of pro- 
ject budgets from schematic stages through final design using conceptualized estimating 
and value engineering methods. 

458. Industrialized Building Systems. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 364. Design and 
development of industrialized building systems and design-build contract methods. 

465. Architectural Design IV. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 364. Design problems 
related to churches and religious education buildings. 

466. Architectural Design V. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 364. Integration of architec- 
tural and environmental consideration into large scale human habitat. 

467. Architectural Restoration. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 364. Study of preserva- 
tion, restoration and reconstruction of existing buildings. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of 
faculty adviser. 

ART (ART— 660) 

(♦Permission of instructor necessary) 

101. Drawing I. 3 hrs. A study of the possibilities of drawing as the expression of a 
variety of ways of seeing and thinking. (JC 1313) 

102. Drawing II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 101*. A continuation of ART 101. (JC 

1323) 

111. Design I. 3 hrs. A study of the basic elemental relationships, plastic intergration 
factors, principles, and the ordering of them toward expression. (JC 1413) 

112. Design II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 111*. A continuation of the study of design 
with color theory and practice. (JC 1423) 

131. Theoretical Foundations. 3 hrs. A study of the scope and nature of the plastic 
expressions with some bases for criticism. (JC 1113) 

201. Figure Drawing I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: *. Study of the structure and anatomy of 
the human figure. Drawing and study from the figure. 

202. Figure Drawing II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: *. Advanced study from the human 
figure involving composition and sustained drawings. 

203. Figure Drawing III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: *. Advanced drawing from the figure 
involving composition, expression and personal vision. 

212. (rafts. 3 hrs. A study of the techniques and problems involved in the creation 
and design of jewelry. May not be used toward the major in art or art education. 



Art/253 

213. Crafts. 3 hrs. A continuation of ART 212 with emphasis in lapidary work. May 
not be used toward the major in art or art education. 

221. Technical Foundations for Painting. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 102 and 112*. 
Experimental problems with traditional painting media and techniques. 

251. Ceramics. 3 hrs. Traditional techniques in the forming, firing, and glazing of 
clay. May not be used toward the major or minor in art or art education. 

301 . Drawing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 102*. Expressive use of a variety of perspec- 
tive systems. 

302. Drawing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 202. Advanced study of visual form in 
drawing. 

303. Drawing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 302. Advanced problematic study of form 
in drawing moving toward personal expression. 

304. Workshop in Drawing. 1-3 hrs. arr. A variety of drawing experiences which 
may be pursued by students at various levels. May not be used toward the major or minor. 

305. Graphic Arts I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 102 and 112. A study of techniques 
and design for linoleum-cut, wood-cut, wood-engraving, and seriography. 

306. Graphic Arts II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 305. A study of techniques and 
design for intaglio. (Line-engraving, dry-point, and etching.) 

307. Graphic Arts III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 306. A study of techniques and 
design for lithography. 

311. Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 1 12*. Studio problems in design, emphasis in- 
dividual student needs. 

312. Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 31 1*. Studio problems in design, emphasis in- 
dividual needs. 

313. Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 312*. Advanced studio problems in design. 

321. Painting I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 221*. Introduction to problematic study of 
form in painting. 

322. Painting II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 321*. Advanced problematic study of 
form in painting. 

323. Painting III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 322*. Advanced problematic study of 
painterly form moving toward an introduction to personal expression. 

324. Workshop in Painting. 1-3 hrs. Painting experiences which may be pursued by 
students at various levels. May not be used toward the major or minor. 

331. Directed Museum and Gallery Tour. 1 hr. An elective addendum to ART 131. 
Field trip and tour of galleries and museums for the viewing of original works. 

332. History of Art I. 3 hrs. Ancient art. A survey course. 

333. History of Art II. 3 hrs. Medieval art. A survey course. 

334. History of Art III. 3 hrs. Renaissance and Baroque art. A survey course. 

335. History of Art IV. 3 hrs. Ninteenth and twentieth century art. A survey course. 

341. Commercial Techniques I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 102 and 1 12*. The render- 
ing of objects and materials for commercial presentation. 

342. Commercial Techniques II. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 341*. Hand and preci- 
sion lettering and advertising and show card layout. 

343. Commercial Techniques HI. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 341, 342*. Study of 
commercial illustrative techniques and their application to layout problems. 

344. Illustration. 3 hrs. Study of photographic illustration. Problems and techniques 
involving the relation of the medium to the subject. 



254/Course Descriptions 

351. Three Dimensional Techniques. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 113. Experimental 
and traditional techniques in the manipulation of clay and plaster. 

352. Three Dimensional Techniques. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 113. Experimental 
and traditional techniques in manipulation of metal and wood. 

412. Crafts I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 112. A study of the techniques and problems 
involved in the creation and design of jewelry. 

413. Crafts II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 112 or ART 412. A continuation of ART 
412 with emphasis in lapidary work. 

414. Crafts III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 112 or ART 412. Techniques and problems 
involved in the creation and design of various fabrics with fibrous materials. 

415. Trends in Current Plastic Expression. 3 hrs. A course designed to keep the stu- 
dent abreast of current trends in the plastic arts. 

420. Adapting Selected Current Art Trends. 3 hrs. Art trends are identified and 
developed in terms of philosophies, practitioners, backgrounds, and techniques. 

421. Painting IV. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 323*. A personal search in painting. 
Class discussion and criticism. 

422. Painting V. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 421*. Advanced development of a per- 
sonal language and statement in painting. 

423. Painting VI. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 422. A sustained individual effort in 
painting leading to the independent work of the senior project. 

428. Painting Project. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 422, 423*. Independent expressive 
problem in painting culminating with an exhibition. 

431. Ancient Art. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 332. Artistic achievements of the ancient 
world. A careful analysis of examples correlated with their background. 

432. Medieval Art. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 333. Art of the western civilizations 
from the fall of the Roman Empire to the end of the fourteenth century. 

433. Renaissance Art. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 333. Art of Italy, France, Germany, 
Spain, and the Low Countries from the close of the Middle Ages through the sixteenth cen- 
tury. 

434. Baroque and Rococo Art. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 333 and 334. The tracing of 
these movements through the western world from the close of the sixteenth through the 
eighteenth century. 

435. Nineteenth Century Art. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 334. An analysis of Neo- 
Classicism, Romanticism, and Impressionism. 

436. Twentieth Century Art. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 334. An analysis of Fauvism, 
Cubism, Futurism, Surrealism, and Expressionism. 

441. Graphic Communication I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 343*. Problems in adver- 
tising design, with particular attention to modern reproduction methods. 

442. Graphic Communication II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 441. Continuation of 
ART 441 including color separation techniques and typographic experiments. 

443. Graphic Communication III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 442. A continuation of 
ART 442, with particular emphasis on professional procedure. 

448. Graphic Communication Project. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 443*. Project in 
advertising design and presentation involving considerable research. Seminar. 

451. Three Dimensional Expression. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 351. Aesthetic pro- 
blems in three dimensional expression, emphasis clay or plaster. 

452. Three Dimensional Expression. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 352. Aesthetic pro- 
blems in three dimensional expression, emphasis wood, metal, or plastics. 



Astronomy/255 

453. Three Dimensional Expression. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 451. Utilitarian pro- 
blems in three dimensional expression, emphasis clay. 

454. Three Dimensional Expression. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 452. Three dimen- 
sional expression, emphasis wood, metal, or plastics. 

458. Three Dimensional Design Project. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 452 and 454. 
Project in three dimensional expression involving considerable research. Seminar. 

ART EDUCATION (ART— 665) 

207. Introductory Art. 3 hrs. For non-art majors. Fundamentals of lettering, draw- 
ing, perspective light and shade, color theory, design, and display techniques. (JC 1213) 

309. Elementary School Art. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ARE 207 (elementary education 
majors); ART 101 and ART 1 1 1 (art education majors). Art theory and techniques to the 
elementary classroom situation. 

310. Public School Art. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ARE 309. An application of art theory 
and techniques to the secondary classroom situation. 

320. Directed Tour of Exemplary Art Education Programs. 3 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: ARE 309 or 3 10. Observation of exemplary art education programs in operation in the 
U.S. or abroad. 

392. Special Projects for Teachers I, II. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: ARE 207. Projects in art 
and methods of presentation to children in the elementary grades. 

426. Curriculum and Instruction in Art Education. 3 hrs. A study of the art cur- 
riculums and instructional programs in the public schools in grades K through twelve. 

491. Art Education Workshop. 2 hrs. A study of art education problems. This 
course may not be applied toward a degree in art education. 

492, Art Education Project. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ARE 309 and ARE 310. A research 
project in specialized art techniques as applied to the classroom situation. 

ASTRONOMY (AST— 365) 

111. General Astronomy. 3 hrs. Introduction to the coordinate systems of the earth 
and celestial sphere, the solar system, comets, and meteorites. 

111-L. General Astronomy Laboratory. 1 hr. 

112. General Astronomy. 3 hrs. Astronomy of deep space, galaxies, the stellar 
energy cycle. 

112-L. General Astronomy Laboratory. 1 hr. 

ATHLETIC ADMINISTRATION AND COACHING (AAC— 710) 

210. Varsity Football. 1 hr. 

211. Varsity Basketball. 1 hr. 

212. Varsity Baseball. 1 hr. 

213. Varsity Track and Field. 1 hr. 

214. Varsity Tennis. 1 hr. 

215. Varsity Golf. 1 hr. 

240. Techniques of Officiating Minor Sports. 3 hrs. Personal skills and officiating 
techniques in varsity sports. To include track and field, swimming, golf, and tennis. 

300. Foundations and Trends in Athletics and Coaching. 3 hrs. The role of athletics 
in society. The sociological, cultural, and ethical dealings with athletics as it relates to 
coaching. 



256/Course Descriptions 

303. Organization and Administration of High School Athletics. 3 hrs. The 
organizational and administrative procedures of major and minor sports programs. 

320. Basic Techniques of Coaching Football. 3 hrs. The study of offensive and 
defensive fundamentals. The philosophies, terminology, strategy, and individual techni- 
ques used in football. 

321. Basic Techniques of Coaching Basketball. 3 hrs. A study of basketball fun- 
damentals. The history, philosophy, terminology, strategy, and individual techniques of 
basketball. 

322. Coaching Wrestling. 2 hrs. Fundamentals of coaching wrestling as it relates to 
the selection of personnel, skills, and proper training procedures. 

323. Coaching Volleyball. 2 hrs. Fundamentals of coaching volleyball as it relates to 
the selection of personnel, skills, and proper training procedures. 

340. Coaching Golf. 2 hrs. Theoretical and practical approach to golf instruction. 
Course planning and maintenance, rules and etiquette, and tournament administration. 

341. Coaching Tennis. 2 hrs. Techniques of coaching tennis. Construction and 
maintenance of tennis courts. Organization and administration of a tennis program. 

360. The Organization and Administration of Aquatics. 3 hrs. Community and 
school swimming programs, pool operation, maintenance, and sanitation. 

361. Coaching Swimming and Diving. 3 hrs. Fundamental principles involved in 
swimming and diving. Selection and placement of personnel, practice schedules, and train- 
ing techniques. 

362. Life Saving: Rescue and Water Safety. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Proficiency in swim- 
ming. American Red Cross Advanced Life Saving Certificate awarded upon course comple- 
tion. 

370. Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. 3 hrs. Theory and practice for the pro- 
spective trainer and coach. 

371 . Diagnostic Techniques. 3 hrs. A specialized course dealing with anatomy, injury 
symptoms, and specific tests to help make preliminary evaluation of injuries. 

372. Athletic Therapy Modalities. 2 hrs. The theory and operation of the most com- 
monly used therapeutic devices of the training room. 

373. Strength, Conditioning, and Rehabilitation. 2 hrs. Building stronger athletes, 
developing maximum efficiency, and post-injury rehabilitation. 

402. Competitive Sports for Children and Youth. 3 hrs. An analysis of the organiza- 
tion, administration, trends, and effects of competitive sports for children and youth. 

403. The Role of Women in Competitive Sports. 3 hrs. A historical and theoretical 
analysis of fundamentals, techniques, methods, administrative procedures, and the im- 
plementation of Title IX. 

404. Equipment and Facilities for Competitive Athletics. 3 hrs. The planning and ad- 
ministration of facilities to include purchasing, care, and inventory of equipment. 

405. Governing Agencies for Competitive Athletics. 3 hrs. An indepth study of the 
governing agencies related to the administration and control of athletic competition. 

409. Psychological and Sociological Aspects of Coaching. 3 hrs. The analysis and 
study of human behavior patterns as they relate to athletics. 

420. Techniques of Officiating Sports. 3 hrs. Personal skills and officiating techni- 
ques of sports. 

421. Advanced Techniques of Coaching Football. 3 hrs. Player selection, offensive 
and defensive formations, and game organization and strategy. 

422. Advanced Techniques of Coaching Basketball. 3 hrs. The criteria of player 
selection with emphasis on the area of theory, principles, and techniques of offensive and 
defensive planning and strategy. 



Biology/257 

423. Coaching Baseball. 3 hrs. The study of advanced techniques of baseball. Em- 
phasis placed on player selection and placement, team organization, and game strategy. 

424. Coaching Track and Field. 3 hrs. Selecting personnel, fundamentals, and train- 
ing techniques. 

425. Field Experience in Officiating Competitive Athletics. 3 hrs. Prerequi- 
sites: AAC 240 and AAC 420. To provide an opportunity for practical experience in of- 
ficiating competitive athletics. 

460. Water Safety Instructor's WSI. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: AAC 362. Knowledge and 
skills beyond the scope of Advanced Life Saving; certifying personnel to conduct water 
safety courses in schools and communities. 

470. Development of Athletic Attributes. 3 hrs. The development and administering 
of strength, endurance, flexibility, reaction, speed, and agility programs. 

471. Practice Organization, Scouting, and Communication Techniques. 3 hrs. Daily 
practice plans. Scouting techniques, cinematography, instructional materials, techniques 
and equipment for coaches. 

472. Field Experience in Athletic Training. 3 hrs. During the senior year, all students 
working toward an athletic training certificate will be given actual practice in the field. 

473. Practicum in Athletic Administration and Coaching. 16 hrs. Provision of ex- 
periences in the unique phases of the Department of Athletic Administration and Coaching 
program. 

474. Taping and Wrapping of Athletic Injuries. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: AAC 370 and 
AAC 371. Practical taping and wrapping experiences consisting of observation and actual 
taping of all types of athletic injuries. 

475. Medical Aspects of Athletic Training. 3 hrs. Team physician and trainer rela- 
tionships. Physical examination, emergency equipment, medical terminology, and pro- 
blems related to the team doctor. 

476. Training Room Practice. 3 hrs. Practical training room experiences consisting 
of observation and actual practice of training room techniques. 

477. Seminar in Sports Medicine. 3 hrs. A study of modern methods and techniques 
utilized in sports medicine as it relates to coaches, trainers, and team physicians. 

BIOLOGY (BIO— 305) 

101. Principles of Animal Biology. 3 hrs. An organism presentation of the lower 
animals; basic anatomy is discussed with emphasis on the ecology. (JC 1133, 1 143, 1 144, 
2414) 

101-L. Principles of Animal Biology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

102. Diversity of Plant Life. 3 hrs. Basic anatomical structures and physiological 
processes of higher plants with minor emphasis on lower plants. (JC 1 134 - 1 133*) 

1021. Diversity of Plant Life Laboratory. 1 hr. 

202. Vertebrate Biology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 101. Anatomy and physiology of 
vertebrate systems. Correlation of structure and function is emphasized. (JC 2424) 

202-L. Vertebrate Biology Laboratory. I hr. 

220. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. 3 hrs. Cells and tissues; integumentary, 
skeletal, muscular, respiratory and circulatory systems. No credit for biology majors. (JC 
1513,2513) 

220-L. Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory. I hr. 

221. Human Anatomy and Physiology II. 3 hrs. Digestive, nervous, urogenital and 
endocrine systems. No credit for biology majors. 

* 1 1 33 is accepted by description from Hinds Junior College. 



258/Course Descriptions 

221-L. Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory. 1 hr. (JC 1523, 2523) 

250. Ornamental Horticulture. 3 hrs. Study of the factors necessary for the growth, 
propagation, recognition, and control of ornamental plants. 

251. Landscape Planning. 3 hrs. Soil conditioning, shrubbery placement, and care 
and maintenance of managed landscapes. 

255. General Botany. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 102. A study of plant form and func- 
tion utilizing representative plant groups. 

255-L. General Botany Laboratory. 1 hr. 

315. Cellular Physiology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: 8 hours of biology, 9 hours of 
chemistry. Cellular anatomy, chemistry, and physics. 

320. Comparative Anatomy. 3 hrs. Phylogeny of the chordates, with special em- 
phasis on vertebrate organ systems. 

320-L. Comparative Anatomy Laboratory. 1 hr. 

401. History of Biology. 3 hrs. Lectures and papers concerning the development of 
biological sciences. 

404. Herpetology. 2 hrs. BIO 101, 102. Collection, preservation, identification and 
distribution of amphibians and reptiles. Field trips when possible. 

404-L. Herpetology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

405. Pharmacology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Vertebrate biology and organic chemistry. 
The response of living organisms to drugs. 

410. Electron Microscopy. 1 hr. Theory and use of the electron microscope and 
associated instrumentation, and darkroom techniques. 

410-L. Electron Microscopy Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

411. Histology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 12 hours of biology. Microscopic anatomy of 
mammalian organ systems. 

411-L. Histology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

412. Microtechnique. 1 hr. Techniques for sectioning, mounting, and staining tissue 
and making whole mounts. 

412-L. Microtechnique Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

415. Pathobiology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 411. Principles of histopathology of 
vertebrates and invertebrates. 

415-L. Pathobiology Laboratory. I hr. 

420. Embryology. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102. Maturation, fertilization, 
cleavage, histogenesis, and organogenesis. 

420-L. Embryology Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

422. Advanced Embryology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 420. Factors which activate or 
regulate developmental processes. 

422-L. Advanced Embryology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

423. Protozoology. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: BIO 101 , 102. Introduction to parasitic and 
free-living proto/oa. 

423-L. Protozoology Laboratory. I hr. 

424. Human Parasitology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 202. Life histories, 
medical significance, and diagnosis of helminths and proto/oa parasitic in man. 

424-L. Human Parasitology Laboratory. I hr. 



Biology/259 

426. Medical Entomology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Arthropod 
vectors and agents of disease. 

426-L. Medical Entomology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

428. Environmental Physiology. 2 hrs. Physiological adaptations enabling animals 
to meet environmental challenges. 

428-L. Environmental Physiology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

429. Invertebrate Physiology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: 12 hours of biology. A functional 
approach to the major invertebrate phyla. 

429-L. Invertebrate Physiology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

430. Mammalian Physiology. 3 hrs. The functions of mammalian systems; interrela- 
tionships and regulation are emphasized. 

430-L. Mammalian Physiology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

432. Comparative Animal Physiology. 3 hrs. Organismic function and the adapta- 
tions which characterize major animal groups. 

432-L. Comparative Animal Physiology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

434. Endocrinology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 202, or consent of instructor. 
Survey of the endocrine system and its regulation of physiological processes. 

435. Ethology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 202. Classical and current concepts of 
animal behavior including individual and social behavioral patterns. 

436. Invertebrate Zoology I. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102. Survey of In- 
vertebrate Phyla Protozoa to Annelida. 

436-L. Invertebrate Zoology I Laboratory. 1 hr. 

437. Invertebrate Zoology II. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 436. Survey of Invertebrate 
Phyla through Hemichordata. 

437-L. Invertebrate Zoology II Laboratory. 1 hr. 

438. Entomology. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102. Structural adaptations, 
classification, life histories and habits, and the economic importance of insects. 

438-L. Entomology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

439. Arachnida Biology. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102. Biology, morphology, 
and classification of the arachnids. 

439-L. Arachnida Biology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

440. Ichthyology. 2 hrs. Collection, preservation, and identification of local fresh 
water fishes and fish-like vertebrates. 

440-L. Ichthyology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

441. Ornithology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 320 recommended. Morphology, tax- 
onomy, life history, distribution, evolution, and adaptations of birds. 

441-L. Ornithology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

442. Mammalogy. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 320 recommended. Morphology, tax- 
onomy, life history, distribution, evolution, and adaptations of mammals. 

442 1. Mammalogy Laboratory. 1 hr. 

443. Principles of Nomenclature. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Discus- 
sions and problems in biological nomenclature. 

444. Biology of Fishes. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Systematica and 
ecology of fishes. 

444-L. Biology of Fishes Laboratory. 1 hr. 



260/Course Descriptions 

445. Introduction to Fishery Science. 2 hrs. A survey of the biology, management, 
and potential yield of fish populations. 

445-L. Introduction to Fishery Science Laboratory. 1 hr. 

448. Introductory Mycology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Taxonomy, 
physiology, and biochemistry of fungi. 

448-L. Introductory Mycology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

449. Introductory Phycology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Tax- 
onomy, physiology, and biochemistry of the algae. 

449-L. Introductory Phycology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

450. Plant Anatomy. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 102. A study of the anatomy of 
vascular plants. 

450-L. Plant Anatomy Laboratory. 1 hr. 

451. Bryophytes and Vascular Plants. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 101, 102. Life cycles, 
evolution, and morphology of bryophytes and vascular plants. 

451-L. Bryophytes and Vascular Plants Laboratory. 1 hr. 

453. Aquatic and Marsh Plants. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Collec- 
tion, identification, and ecology of plants of fresh and brackish water. 

453-L. Aquatic and Marsh Plants Laboratory. 1 hr. 

454. Plant Physiology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: General and organic chemistry recom- 
mended. The basic physiological processes of green plants. 

454-L. Plant Physiology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

455. Economic Botany. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 102 or consent of instructor. 
Origin, distribution, and significance of plants most important to man. 

455-L. Economic Botany Laboratory. 1 hr. 

457. Taxonomy of Local Flora. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102. The classifica- 
tion of the local flora. 

457-L. Taxonomy of Local Flora Laboratory. 1 hr. 

458. Dendrology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BIO 102. The taxonomic and ecological 
characteristics, and the distribution of trees. 

458-L. Dendrology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

460. Zoogeography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A descriptive and 
analytical study of the distribution of animals. 

461. Ecology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Interrelationships of 
organisms to their environment. 

461-L. Ecology Laboratory. I hr. 

462. Population and Community Ecology. 2 hrs. Collection, analysis, and inter- 
pretation of data on natural populations and communities. 

462 1. Population and Community Ecology Laboratory. I hr. 

465. Freshwater Biology. I hr. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Collection, iden- 
tification, and ecology of aquatic organisms significant to water quality. 

465-1.. Freshwater Biology Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

466. Limnology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The physical, chemical, 
and biological conditions in lakes, ponds, and streams. 

466-L. Limnology Laboratory. 1 hr. 



Business Education/261 

467. Introduction to Biological Oceanography. 2 hrs. Topography, bottom 
sediments, and characteristics of sea water. 

467-L. Introduction to Biological Oceanography Laboratory. 1 hr. 

470. Natural History of Infectious Diseases. 3 hrs. A study of infectious diseases and 
their effect on man. 

472. Natural History of Animals. 1 hr. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Life 
histories of animals. Designed for teachers. 

472-L. Natural History of Animals Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

473. Natural History of Plants. 1 hr. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Life 
histories of plants. Designed for teachers. 

473-L. Natural History of Plants Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

475. Plant Ecology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Advanced standing in botany. Relationship 
of plants to their environment. 

475-L. Plant Ecology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

492. Biological Problems I, II, III, IV. 1 -6 hrs. Courses in special techniques, design- 
ed for majors with a need for certain basic techniques as tools for research. 

493. Field Biology. 2-6 hrs. arr. Ecological and taxonomic studies. Offered between 
semesters as 4- to 12-day field trips. 

496. Undergraduate Seminar I, II, HI. 1-3 hrs. The presentation and discussions of 
current biological topics. 

The following courses are taught at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory in Ocean Springs 
by the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory Staff. 

481. Marine Vertebrate Zoology. 6 hrs. Prerequisite: 16 hours of biology. Survey of 
marine chordates; fishes, reptiles, mammals, and shore birds. 

483. Marine Invertebrate Zoology. 6 hrs. Prerequisites: 16 hours of biology. Mor- 
phology, distribution, and ecology of the phyla Protozoa through Protochordates. 

485. Marine Parasitology. 6 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Emphasis on 
morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and host-parasite relationships. 

486. Salt Marsh Ecology. 4 hrs. The botanical aspects of local marshes; includes 
plant identification, composition and structure. 

487. Marine Aquaculture. 6 hrs. Problems and procedures relating to the culture of 
commercially important crustaceans, fish, and mollusks. 

488. Introduction to Marine Zoology. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biology. An in- 
troduction to marine environment and local fauna. 

489. Marine Botany. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: 10 hours of biology including botany. A 
survey, based upon local examples, of the principal groups of marine algae. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION (BED— 105) 

101. Elementary Typewriting. 3 hrs. For beginners. 4 Acquiring keyboard control, 
developing correct typewriting techniques, and applying this skill to problems. (JC 1103, 
1113) 

102. Intermediate Typewriting.** 3 hrs. A review of keyboard and manipulative con- 
trols, with emphasis on letter styles, manuscripts, and tabulated reports. (JC 1 123) 

200. Introduction to Business Communication. 3 hrs. Basic mechanics of grammar 
usage and punctuation for business communications. 

201. Beginning Shorthand. 3 hrs. For beginners.* Shorthand theory with practice; 
emphasis on fluency of reading and writing; some dictation and transcription. Laboratory 
included. (JC 1203, 1213) 



262/Course Descriptions 

202. Intermediate Shorthand.** 3 hrs. Review of shorthand theory, with emphasis 
on dictation, pre-transcription factors, and transcription. Laboratory included. (JC 1223) 

300. Business Communications. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BED 200, ENG 101 and 102. 
Study and application of principles and techniques used in analyzing problems and writing 
effective business letters and memos. 

302. Foundations in Consumer and Economics Education. 3 hrs. Concepts and prin- 
ciples of economic and business structures for economic literacy. 

305. Dictation and Transcription.** 3 hrs. Automatic review of shorthand theory, 
with emphasis on speed and transcription of mailable transcripts. Laboratory included. 

310. Advanced Typewriting.** 3 hrs. Emphasis on speed and accuracy in preparing 
stencils, business forms, legal documents, tables, manuscripts, and letters. 

340. Adding and Calculator Machine Operation. 2 hrs. Operation of rotary and 
printing calculators; full keyboard and ten-key adding machines. Laboratory included. 

352. Filing Systems and Records Management. 2 hrs. Study of major filing systems; 
rules for alphabetizing; application of filing to specific types of businesses. 

354. Problems in Typewriting. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BED 310. Techniques in skill 
building; speed and accuracy in typing a variety of office forms; emphasis on production 
work. 

360. Word Processing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Ability to typewrite. The theory of word 
processing as an office system; skill development in the operation of automated magnetic 
keyboard typewriters. 

450. Office Appliances. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Typewriting ability. Operation of 
calculators, adding and posting machines, electric typwriters, mimeoscopes, transcribing 
and duplicating machines. Laboratory included. 

451. The Project Method in Distributive Education. 3 hrs. The project method of 
teaching distributive education; individualized instructional materials; laboratory ac- 
tivities; evaluation; and research. 

452. History and Philosophy of Vocational Education. 3 hrs. History; concepts, of- 
fice occupations, employment opportunities, procedures, and techniques ( for business and 
distributive education teachers only). 

453. Techniques of Coordination. 3 hrs. Techniques and procedures used in coor- 
dinating office occupations programs. 

454. Methods and Materials in Teaching Distributive Education. 3 hrs. Principles, 
concepts, program plans, curricula, methods and instructional materials, activities, 
research, and evaluation. 

455. Organization and Administration of Distributive Education. 3 hrs. Basic pro- 
blems, objectives, and characteristics of DE programs as applied in their development. 

460. Office Management. 3 hrs. Principles of management; office organization and 
supervision; layout, supplies, machines, personnel, forms, reports, and services. 

472. Executive Secretarial Shorthand.** 3 hrs. Final emphasis on speed and 
transcription of mailable copy; focus on vocabulary in specialized fields. Laboratory in- 
cluded. 

475. Legal Secretaryship. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BED 305 and 310 or equivalent. A 
course stressing the professional aspects of legal secretarial practices and procedures. 

476. Medical Office Procedures and Records Management. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BED 
102. Emphasis on the professional aspects of the work of a medical secretary. Laboratory 
included. 

477. Medical Transcription. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BED 102. Emphasis on medical ter- 
minology, records, forms, and letters, with limited transcription. 



Chemistry/263 

478. Advanced Medical Transcription. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BED 477. Emphasis on 
additional medical terminology, with increased emphasis on transcription. 

479. Review for the Certified Professional Secretary Examination. 3 hrs. Prere- 
quisites: Typewriting and shorthand skills. A course to prepare persons for the Certified 
Professional Secretary Examination not to be counted toward any degree at the University 
of Southern Mississippi. 

480. Research and Report Writing. 3 hrs. Concepts and methods of business research 
and style; problems in researching and reporting business data in written form. 

485. Office Practice and Secretarial Procedures. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BED 310. Pro- 
blems in secretarial work, along with the developing of desirable personality traits and good 
human relations. 

492. Special Problems in Business Education. 1-3 hrs. Study approved and directed 
by the department chairman. 

*A student with one year of typewriting in high school cannot get credit for BED 101 , and 
a student with one year of shorthand in high school cannot get credit for BED 201. A stu- 
dent who has had more work than this in either or both fields should consult with the chair- 
man of the Department of Business Education about the appropriate beginning courses for 
his program. 

**Prerequisite for all typewriting and shorthand courses— Grade of C or better, or 
equivalent, in the preceding course. 



CHEMISTRY (CHE— 320) 

100. Introductory Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: High school algebra or MAT 199 
or MAT 101, either of which may be taken concurrently. A preparatory course (for CHE 
101) in chemical fundamentals; does not satisfy core requirements in College of Science and 
Technology or Schools of Nursing and Home Economics. 

101. General Chemistry I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: High school chemistry or CHE 100; 
high school algebra or MAT 101 or MAT 199, which may be taken concurrently. Molecular 
structure, stoichiometry, the mole concept, types of solutions, energy-enthalpy. (JC 1213, 
1214) 

101 -L. Laboratory for CHE 101. 1 hr. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 

101 . Concurrent registration in CHE 101 is required. 

102. General Chemistry II. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CHE 101 and MAT 101. Gases, 
kinetics, equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, coordination 
compounds. (JC 1223, 1224) 

102-L. Laboratory for CHE 102. 1 hr. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 

102. Concurrent registration in CHE 102 is required. 

104. Chemistry, Principles and Applications. 3 hrs. For nonscience majors. Em- 
phasis on the impact of chemical discovery and technology on the individual and society. 
This course does not satisfy core requirements in the College of Science and Technology or 
the Schools of Nursing and Home Economics. 

104L. Lab for CHE 104. 1 hr. Corequisite: CHE 104. The laboratory designed to ac- 
company CHE 104. 

251. Elementary Organic Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 101. A short survey 
course in organic chemistry designed for students majoring in health sciences and in some 
areas of home economics. 

251-L. Laboratory for CHE 251. 1 hr. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 
251. Concurrent registration in CHE 251 is required. 

252. Bioorganic Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 251. A continuation of CHE 
251. CHE 25 1 and 252 should not be considered as a substitute for CHE 351, 352. 



264/Course Descriptions 

252-L. Laboratory for CHE 252. 1 hr. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 
252. Concurrent registration in CHE 252 is required. 

300. Chemical Safety. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 252 or 352 or permission of the in- 
structor. Hazards of various commonly used chemicals. Includes 3 hours of laboratory per 
week. 

311. Analytical Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 102. Chemical equilibrium. 
Gravimetric, and columetric analysis. Introductory instrumental analysis. 

311-L. Laboratory for CHE 311. 2 hrs. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 
311. Concurrent registration in CHE 3 1 1 is required. 

321. Elementary Biochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 252. A one-semester course 
in biochemistry. 

321 -L. Laboratory for CHE 321. 1 hr. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 
321 . Concurrent registration in CHE 321 is required. 

322. Clinical Biochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 321. A course designed to ac- 
quaint the student with the biochemical basis for clinical diagnosis. 

351. Organic Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 102. Aliphatic compounds: 
nomenclature, reaction mechanisms, sterochemistry, and spectroscopic analysis. 

351-L. Laboratory for CHE 351. 1 hr. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 

35 1 . Concurrent registration in CHE 35 1 is required. 

352. Organic Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 351. Aromatic compounds, 
acids, acid derivatives, aldehydes, ketones, amines, phenols, and an introduction to several 
polyfunctional compounds (carbohydrates, aminoacids, proteins). 

352-L. Laboratory for CHE 352. 2 hrs. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 

352. Concurrent registration in CHE 352 is required. 

361. Physical Chemistry for Pre-Medical and Biological Sciences Students. 4 

hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 103 and CHE 311. Gas laws, kinetics, equilibrium and free 
energy, electrochemistry, pH, buffers, and membrane phenomena. 

362. Physical Chemistry for Pre-Medical and Biological Sciences Students. 4 

hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 361 . A continuation of CHE 361 . CHE 361 and 362 are not to be 
taken by chemistry majors. 

400. Chemical Literature. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: CHE 352 and 31 1 . The selection and 
use of the reference materials of chemistry: periodicals, journals, texts, patents, and other 
sources of information. 

401. Glass Blowing. 2 hrs. Simple operations of glass blowing to enable the student 
to make common apparatus. 

402. Chemistry of the Atmosphere. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 311. Radiocarbon cy- 
cle, atmospheric photochemistry, weather patterns, greenhouse effect, combustion 
pollutants, health hazards. 

403. Industrial Chemistry. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Impor- 
tant processes used in industry. Invited industrial representatives and plant visits keep the 
topics current and useful. 

411. Instrumental Analysis. 4 hrs. Prerequisites: CHE 352 and 311. Theory and 
practice of analytical instrumentation; absorption spectroscopy, chromatography, mass 
spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance. Includes 3 hours of laboratory per week. 

421. Biochemistry I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHI: 352. The properties of amino acids, 
proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; actions of en/ymes and protein synthesis. 

422. Biochemistry II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 421 . Major metabolic pathways with 
emphasis on energy considerations and inicrrclationships of the pathways. 



Child Development/265 

426. Introduction to Biochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 352. A one-semester 
survey course for science majors which emphasizes the chemical principles underlying 
biochemistry. 

427-L. Biochemistry Laboratory I. 1 hr. Corequisite. CHE 421 or CHE 426. An op- 
tional laboratory course to accompany CHE 421 or CHE 426. 

428-L. Biochemistry Laboratory II. 1 hr. Prerequisite: CHE 427. Corequisite: CHE 
422. A continuation of CHE 427. 

431. Inorganic Chemistry. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 352 and 31 1. Models, concepts, 
bonding and periodic trends in inorganic chemistry. Includes 3 hours of laboratory per 
week. 

432. Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 43 1 . Models, proper- 
ties, reactions, and synthesis of inorganic compounds and complexes. 

441. Application of Nuclear Techniques. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 102. Applied 
biological, chemical and environmental problems. Topics: radio-isotope handling, radia- 
tion detection, shielding, tracer techniques. Includes 3 hours of laboratory per week. 

451. Qualitative Organic Analysis. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 352. The systematic 
identification of pure organic compounds and the analysis of mixtures. Includes 6 hours of 
laboratory per week. 

461. Physical Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 227 and CHE 352. Chemical 
thermodynamics, kinetics, surface phenomena, quantum chemistry, symmetry, spec- 
troscopy, and molecular structure. 

461 -L. Laboratory for CHE 461. 1 hr. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 

461 . Concurrent registration in CHE 461 is required. 

462. Physical Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 461. A continuation of CHE 461. 

462-L. Laboratory for CHE 462. 1 hr. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 

462. Concurrent registration in CHE 462 is required. 

496. Special Projects I. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of faculty. Library and 
laboratory research on a problem chosen in consultation with the adviser. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT (CD— 805) 

350. Child Development. 3 hrs. Designed to create interest in preschool children and 
to foster understanding of their development and behavior patterns. 

351 . Home and Preschool Relationships. 3 hrs. Study of relationships of parents and 
children with emphasis on principles, procedures, and methods of working with parents in 
groups or individually. 

359. Preschool Teachers' Workshop I, II, III. 1 hr. For teachers, administrators, 
and educational leaders of preschool centers with emphasis on administration, curriculum, 
and other appropriate subjects. 

450. Administration of Preschool Programs. 3 hrs. A course in the organizational 
structure and management of various preschool programs. 

451. Infant Development. 3 hrs. Emphasis will be given to the development and 
behavior of the infant. 

452. Child Development Methods and Materials. 3 hrs. Provisions are made to 
evaluate and select materials for use in developing teaching techniques and planning play 
activities for children. 

453. Creative Activities for the Preschool Child. 3 hrs. A study of creative activities 
for preschool children with practical experiences provided. 

454. Participation Experiences in the Infant Development Center. 3 hrs. air. Prereq- 
uisite: CD 452. Directed participation as an assistant in the Infant Development Center for 
one semester. 



266/Course Descriptions 

455. Supervised Participation. 4hrs. Prerequisite: CD 452. Directed participation as 
an assistant in the Nursery School for one semester. 

459. Symposium in Child Development. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
A study of theories and recent research used in preschool education. 

492. Special Problems in Child Development. 1-4 hrs. Prerequisites: CD 350 and 
consent of instructor. 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES (CT— 810) 

131. Selection of Clothing and Textiles. 3 hrs. Understanding and applying the fun- 
damental principles of garment construction. (JC 1313, 1332) 

221. Fashion Modeling and Fashion Show Production. 3 hrs. Basic principles of 
fashion modeling and fashion show production. 

321. New York Study Tour. 2 hrs. arr. Alternate years. Planned tour to New York 
with emphasis on clothing, textiles, fashion, and interiors. Junior or senior standing. 

328. Fashion Display. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 1 1 1 or ARE 207. Study available 
resources of display materials and laboratory experiences in fashion display. 

330. Consumer Textiles. 3 hrs. Study of textile fibers, fabrics, finishes, and legisla- 
tion as related to serviceability. 

332. Art Related to the Home and Dress. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 1 1 1 or ARE 207. 
Experiences in perceiving visual design elements as they relate to the home and dress. 

333. Family Clothing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CT 131. Interpreting and solving pro- 
blems associated with clothing a family, with laboratory emphasis on advanced clothing 
construction and pattern alteration. 

334. Textiles. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CHE 101, 102; CT 330. Study of textile products 
and evaluation of characteristics relating to end-use performance. 

335. Clothes and Cultures. 3 hrs. Cultural and economic factors concurrent to the 
adoption and abandonment of dress from ancient times to the present. 

337. Quality Recognition of Fashion Apparel. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CT 131, 330. To 
become familiar with the variety and quality of materials used in the production of apparel. 

430. Textile Product Evaluation. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CT 330 and 334, ECO 301, or 
approval of instructor. Testing textile fabrics by ASTM and AATCC methods; planning, 
conducting, and interpreting textile research. 

431. Tailoring. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CT 333 or equivalent. Principles and techniques 
of tailoring applied to men's and women's apparel. 

432. Textile Economics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. A study of the 
economic principles involved in the production, distribution, and consumption of textile 
products. 

433. Flat Pattern Design. 3 hrs. Application of flat pattern design techniques to the 
creation of dress designs. 

434. History of Decorative Textiles. 3 hrs. Historical and methodological study of 
applied and structural textile design. 

435. Fashion Fundamentals I. hrs. Prerequisites: MKT 330, 342; CT 337. 
Understanding the basic elements and principles of fashions as related to the apparel in- 
dustry. 

436. Fashion Fundamentals II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CT 435. Understanding the 
workings and mechanics of the apparel industry and its relationship with the production 
and distribution of fashion. 

437. Apparel Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ART 1 1 1 or ARE 207; CT 330, 335. 
Fashion from the designer's viewpoint; terminology, methods, and influences. Experiences 
in designing. 



Computer Science/267 

439. Retail Management Internship I, II. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: CT 436, 437; MKT 
300, 330, 342. Clothing Merchandising majors are required to take Part 1 and II of the In- 
ternship (4 hours). Understanding the operation and management of retail activities 
through a training-work program in a cooperating department store. Approval must be ob- 
tained from internship coordinator. 

492. Special Problems. 1-6 hrs. A directed individual study planned and approved by 
the chairman of the department. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSS— 330) 

100. Introduction to Computing. 3 hrs. Computer concepts, forms of I/O, system 
design and analysis, recording data, and programming languages. (JC 1 1 13) 

211. Statistical Methods I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Sampling 
and sampling distributions: normal and binomial, measures of central tendency and disper- 
sion. (JC-BAD-2323) 

212. Statistical Methods II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 211. Hypothesis testing, cor- 
relation, regression analysis, analysis of variance and covariance. 

240. Introduction to Programming Laboratory. 3 hrs. Techniques of programming 
using the FORTRAN language. (JC 1213) 

320. Introduction to Linear Programming Techniques. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 
103. Vectors and Euclidean spaces, linear transformations, convex sets and hyperplanes, 
theory of simplex method, the transportation problem. 

323. Applied Techniques in Statistics and Engineering. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 
377 or 378. Laplace transforms, frequency and time-domain analysis of linear systems. 

324. Applied Techniques in Statistics and Engineering. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 
377 or 378. State variable theory, time-domain analysis of linear systems. 

340. Advanced Fortran Programming. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 240 or equivalent. 
Advanced Fortran concepts, algorithmic procedures, and data structures. 

341. Digital Computer Programming. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 340. Assembler 
language coding: registers, instruction formats, decimal and floating point arithmetic, I/O 
coding, system capabilities, program states. 

342. Introduction to COBOL Programming. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 240. Program- 
ming of problems using the COBOL language. 

350. Data Structures. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 342 or equivalent. A continuation of 
COBOL with emphasis on file creation, organization, maintenance, sorting, searching, and 
retrieval techniques. 

370. Hardware Systems I. 3 hrs. Design, analysis and implementation of digital logic 
systems with emphasis on breadboarding. 

370-L Hardware Systems Laboratory. 1 hr. 

371. Hardware Systems II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 370. A continuation of CSS 370. 

400. Computing for Secondary /Junior College Teachers. 3 hrs. State of the art study 
in utilizing the computer as a tool in the classroom. Use and development of instructional 
packages. Cannot count toward a degree. 

415. Methods of Mathematical Statistics I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. Hypothesis testing, power of tests, analysis of variance, orthogonal contrasts, fix- 
ed, random and mixed models. 

416. Methods of Mathematical Statistics II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 415. Simple 
and multiple linear regression, polynomial regression, multi-way analysis of variance, ran- 
domized blocks and nested factorials. 

417. Experimental Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 416. Factorials, randomized 
blocks, Latin squares and split-plot, fractional factorials and confounding, response sur- 
face models. 



268/Course Descriptions 

418. Sampling Methods. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 415. The planning, execution, and 
evaluation of sample surveys. Simple random sampling, stratified randon sampling, cluster 
sampling. 

420. Numerical Analysis I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 278 and CSS 240. Numerical 
solution to transcendental equations, systems of linear and non-linear equations. Milne's 
method, Runge-Kutta method. 

421. Numerical Analysis II. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 377 and CSS 240. Modeling 
of continous and discrete systems, approximation to computer based functions. Pade' ap- 
proximation. 

422. Operations Research. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 320. PERT-CPM, dynamic and 
quadratic programming, parametric and integer linear programming, penalty functions. 

423. Digital Signal Processing I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 323. Theory, design and 
implementation of digital signal processing structures. 

424. Digital Signal Processing II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 423. Design and im- 
plementation of digital image processing techniques. Image enhancements and pattern 
recognition. 

425. Computer Graphics Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 340. Theory, design and 
use of computer graphic systems. 

426. Computer Aided Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 425. Design of man-machine 
interaction. 

435. Theoretical Statistics I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 240. Discrete simulation of in- 
ventory systems, random walks, queuing systems, networks, and computer systems. Use of 
GPSS simulation language. 

436. Theoretical Statistics II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 435. Advanced model design. 
Simulation of complex stochastic systems. Extended use of GPDS and GPSS simulation 
packages. 

441. Programming Languages. 5 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 341. A survey of program- 
ming languages such as ALGOL, APL, PASCAL, SNOBOL4, and XPL. 

442. Business Computer Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 342. Methods of system 
analysis, data acquisition, file structures, terminal selection, use of flowcharts and decision 
tables. 

450. Systems Programming. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Research 
projects in systems problems. Research will involve current software or hardware topics. 

451. Systems Programming. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A con- 
tinuation of CSS 450. 

460. Computer Software I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CSS 341 and 441. Data structures 
and assemblers. 

461. Computer Software II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 460. An in-depth study of com- 
pilers and compiler writing techniques. 

462. Computer Software III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 34L An in-depth study of 
operating systems (batch, time-sharing and real time systems). 

470. Digital Systems I. 3 hrs. Corequisite: CSS 470-L. Analysis and synthesis of com- 
binational, synchronous sequential, and asynchronous sequential circuits. 

470-L. Digital Systems I Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: CSS 470. 

471. Digital Systems II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 470. Architectural organization of 
digital systems, microprogramming. 

471-L. Digital Systems II Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: CSS 471. 

476. Continuous Systems Modeling and Simulation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 405 
or CSS 323. Modeling and simulation of physical systems using analog and digital techni- 
ques. 



Construction/269 

477. Process Control Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 476. Fundamentals of direct 
digital control systems, real-time data handling. 

478. Digital Control System. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 341. Design of systems in- 
corporating a computer as an on-line element. Design of control algorithms and optimal 
control techniques. 

478-L. Digital Control Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: CSS 478. 

480. Data Processing and File Management. 5 hrs. Prerequisites: CSS 342 and 350. 
Organization and maintenance of sequential, direct access and index sequential files. 
Design of on-line file systems. 

490. Computer Science Seminar. 1-3 hrs. arr. Presentation of technical topics in the 
field. 

492. Computer Science Problems I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Solution of 
problems germane to a select area of study. 

493. Computer Science Problems II. 3 hrs. Solution of problems germane to a select 
area of study. 

CONSTRUCTION (BCT— 393) 

101. Construction Practices I. 2 hrs. Basic construction techniques, tools and equip- 
ment, and job planning analysis used in residential projects. 

205. Surveying. 3 hrs. Theory and practice in use of instruments for measuring 
distances, angles, etc., as applied in architecture and construction. 

235. Building Systems I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ACT 132, ACT 204. Residential 
building systems design and planning, with emphasis on materials integration, methods of 
construction and architectural detailing. 

302. Construction Practices II. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 101. Continuation of BCT 
101, with emphasis on commercial and industrial construction. 

307. Construction Equipment. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: GLY 101. Construction equip- 
ment selection and utilization for commercial and heavy-highway construction. 

336. Building Systems II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 235. Commercial building 
systems design and planning with emphasis on materials integration, methods of construc- 
tion and building codes. 

354. Construction Estimating. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 336. Material quantity 
survey techniques used in estimating costs of construction projects. 

355. Cost Analysis and Bid Preparation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 354. Determina- 
tion of construction cost, bidding procedures, and analysis of job cost data. 

374. Construction Organization. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 336. Analysis of contrac- 
ting functions and management concepts. 

375. Construction Safety. 2 hrs. Development and management of accident preven- 
tion programs in construction. 

392. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. arr. Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of 
faculty adviser. 

400. Senior Project. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of faculty 
adviser. 

401. Senior Project. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of faculty 
adviser. 

444. Concrete and Formwork Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 443. Design of rein- 
forced concrete structural members and systems. Concrete formwork design and cost 
analysis. 

445. Soils and Foundations. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ACT 443, GLY 101. Theory and 
application of soil mechanics to foundation design and construction. 



270/Course Descriptions 

458. Construction Planning and Scheduling. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 355. Critical 
Path Method (CPM) as a project planning, scheduling, and monitoring technique. 

476. Construction Labor. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 374. A study of construction 
labor resources, labor history, and governmental labor regulations. 

477. Construction Project Management. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BCT 355, BCT 374, 
BCT 458, BCT 476. Field quality control and work methods analysis techniques. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of 
faculty adviser. 



COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELOR EDUCATION (CPY— 140) 

100. Orientation. 1 hr. 

101. Foundations of Personal Development. 1 hr. An introduction to the principles 
of human development. Open to freshman and transfers only. 

310. Introduction to Social and Rehabilitation Services. 3 hrs. An orientation via a 
review of relevant history, legal mandates, philosophy, objectives, and applied services. Of- 
fered only with CPY 360. 

311. Assessment and Evaluation in Social and Rehabilitation Services. 3 hrs. In- 
troduction to basic assessment and evaluation techniques and application of these in 
rehabilitation settings. 

312. Counseling Theory and Practice. 3 hrs. Emphasizes theories and principles 
undergirding the practical application of various helping techniques. Offered only with 
CPY 361. 

360. Social and Rehabilitation Services Laboratory I. 3 hrs. Includes selected 
readings, discussion goups and directed field visits. Offered only with CPY 310. 

361. Social and Rehabilitation Services Laboratory II. 3 hrs. Application of inter- 
view and group techniques through personal interaction experiences. Offered only with 
CPY 312. 

413. Vocational Development and the World of Work. 3 hrs. An introduction to the 
study of vocational development and occupations. 

423. Group Procedures. 3 hrs. Introduction to the fundamentals of developmental 
group work, with emphasis on individual behaviors in a group setting. 

430. Principles and Processes of Case Management. 3 hrs. This course focuses on the 
coordination of specific functional tasks associated with rehabilitation services. 

431. Medical Aspects of Rehabilitation. 3 hrs. An introduction to the chronically 
disabling conditions both from the viewpoint of treatment processes and individual adjust- 
ment. 

432. Introduction to Community Resources. 3 hrs. A study of the nature and 
development of agency resources within the community. 

433. Workshop in Counseling Procedures. 3 hrs. A workshop to familiarize 
counselor personnel with new and innovative procedures in facilitating client development. 

434. Guidance of the Exceptional Child. 3 hrs. A course to acquaint counselors and 
teachers with special considerations involved in providing guidance and child development 
services for exceptional children. 

435. Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Intervention. 3 hrs. Intervention strategies in 
working with drug abusers with emphasis on the alcoholic. 

462-463. Social and Rehabilitation Services Field Practicum I, II. 6 hrs. To be taken 
as an individual field practicum within an agency or facility. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 



Criminal Justice/271 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJ— 281) 

200. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 hrs. An introduction to criminal law, 
criminological thought, and the operation of the criminal justice system. (JC-SOC-1313) 

325. American Criminal Justice Theory. 3 hrs. A survey of major American theories 
of criminal justice and of foreign theories directly influencing them. 

330. Criminal Law. 3 hrs. A survey of applied substantive criminal law with em- 
phasis on the most common criminal offenses. 

331. Criminal Court Practice. 3 hrs. An indepth study of the criminal case within the 
several courts of the state and federal systems. 

332. Traffic Law. 3 hrs. An analysis of prevailing traffic law and methods of en- 
forcement. 

333. Evidence, Search, and Seizure. 3 hrs. An examination of the laws of evidence 
and the procedures for obtaining it. 

340. The Development of Modern Police Systems. 3 hrs. A survey of the 
philosophical and administrative development of policing in Great Britain and the United 
States. 

341. Police Methods and Organization. 3 hrs. A survey of the organization and ad- 
ministration of the American police. 

342. Criminal Investigation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CJ 330. An overview of the crime 
solving process with emphasis on methodology, corpus delecti, and evidence. 

350. Theories of Criminal Penalties. 3 hrs. An exploration of the mandate and 
methods for society to impose penalties upon its criminal offenders. 

351. The Development of Modern Penal Systems. 3 hrs. A survey of the 
philosophical and administrative development of modern penology in Europe and the 
United States. 

352. Introduction to Modern Corrections. 3 hrs. An overview of major correctional 
systems and methods of treatment of offenders. 

353. Law of Criminal Corrections. 3 hrs. A survey of the newly emerging rights of 
detained and incarcerated individuals. 

360. Introduction to Juvenile Justice. 3 hrs. A survey of the common law roots of 
juvenile law, the unfolding of case law in American history, and the development of the 
juvenile court and juvenile corrections. 

361. Delinquency Prevention. 3 hrs. An indepth study of contemporary theory and 
methodology on delinquency prevention. 

370. Crime Prevention. 3 hrs. A survey of methods of protecting life and property in 
the community and in industry. 

371 . Volunteers in the Criminal Justice System. 3 hrs. A survey of volunteerism with 
special emphasis on crime and delinquency prevention, the courts, and corrections. 

400. Criminal Justice Practicum. 3, 6, or 9 hrs. Prerequisites: Major in Criminal 
Justice with junior or senior standing and with permission of the chairman. Field work of- 
fering research and practice in a criminal justice agency. 

425. Theories of Criminal Justice. 3 hrs. An analysis of the theory of criminal justice 
from Aristotle to the present. 

426. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. 3 hrs. A study of foreign criminal 
justice systems emphasizing possible reforms for the American system. 

430. Criminal Procedure. 3 hrs. A study of the procedural rules for the judicial en- 
forcement of substantive criminal law. 

450. Administration of Criminal Corrections. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CJ 352. An in- 
depth study of the administrative process in the correctional system. 



272/Course Descriptions 

451. Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections. 3 hrs. An examination of pro- 
bation and parole systems and other alternatives to incarceration. 

452. Group Techniques in Corrections. 3 hrs. An indepth examination of the ap- 
plication of group therapy to criminal offenders. 

460. Juvenile Justice. 3 hrs. A study of the law concerning investigation of juvenile 
offenders, disposition of offenders, and juvenile courts. 

461. Juvenile Corrections. 3 hrs. An indepth study of the various treatment 
modalities currently employed. 

462. Comparative Juvenile Justice. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CJ 360 or 460 or approval 
of professor. An intensive study of a limited number of topics in the juvenile justice systems 
of Europe offered through the Department's Overseas Studies Program. 

470. Political Economy of Criminal Justice. 3 hrs. An analysis of political and 
economic factors influencing the criminal justice system. 

471. Victims of Crime. 3 hrs. An indepth study of criminal victimization concern- 
trating on the victims of specific crimes and remedies for victimization. 

480. Seminar in Criminal Justice. 3 hrs. An interdisciplinary seminar covering 
significant problem areas in the criminal justice system. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. arr. Prerequisites: Major in criminal justice with 
senior standing and permission by the chairman. Supervised research in a specific field. 



CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (CIE)— 115) 

100. Developmental Processes in Elementary Mathematics. 3 hrs. A review of the 
fundamentals of elementary arithmetic, algebra, and geometry for preservice elementary 
teachers with weak math backgrounds. 

102. Improvement of Study. 1 hr. An analysis of effective study techniques. Useful 
for college students who wish to improve their own reading and study habits. May be taken 
three times for credit. 

300. Introduction to Elementary Education. 3 hrs. An introduction course to include 
field experiences. 

301 . Methods and Materials in Elementary School Arithmetic. 3 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: MAT 210. A course which utilizes modern strategies of psychology and methodology 
in elementary school mathematics on exploratory, structural, and mastery levels of learn- 
ing. 

305. Social Studies in the Elementary Grades. 3 hrs. Emphasis is on the social science 
interdisciplinary approach for content and methodology, problem solving, unit teaching, 
and thinking. 

306. Language Arts in the Elementary School. 3 hrs. Emphasizes the methods and 
materials for teaching handwriting, creative writing, listening, speaking, and grammar in 
grades 1 through 8. 

309. Developing Skills in Reading. 3 hrs. Develops performances required in instruc- 
tional and recreational reading; and materials used to teach these skills in grades 1 through 
8. 

311. Kindergarten and Primary Reading Instruction. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CIE 306 
and 309. Explores primary reading as a developmental process through units on grouping, 
objectives, media, diagnosis and prescription, and selected approaches. 

312. Middle School Reading Instruction. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CIE 306 and 309. Ex- 
plores reading by developing topics on patterns, objectives, materials, approaches, content 
area reading, and diagnosis and prescription for grades 4 through 8. 



Curriculum and Instruction/273 

317. Methods and Materials in Children's Literature. 3 hrs. An introduction to 
children's primary literature, in all forms, and a study of ways in which it is integrated into 
the curriculum for enrichment. 

318. Literature for the Middle School. 3 hrs. A study of literature appropriate for 
use in grades 4 through 8 stressing effective use of literature in the school program. 

330. Readiness Programs for Young Children. 3 hrs. A course dealing with varied 
phases of comprehensive readiness programs for children in elementary school. 

343. Methods and Materials in Elementary Education. 3 hrs. Offered concurrently 
with student teaching (CIE 482), this general methods course examines materials and 
methods of teaching pupils in grades four through eight. 

403. Kindergarten — Primary Education. 3 hrs. A practicum designed to give 
teaching experiences in understanding the social, emotional, physical and cognitive growth 
and development of children. 

407. Strategies for Teaching Reading in the Elementary School. 3 hrs. A survey of 
the methods and approaches used to teach reading in the elementary school. 

412. Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disability for the Classroom Teacher. 3 

hrs. Prerequisite: CIE 306, 309 and 311 or 312. Provides relevant practicum experiences in 
evaluation and gives extended opportunities in child tutoring appropriate to grades 2-8. 

422. Curriculum Development for Career Education. 3 hrs. Introduction to prin- 
ciples of curriculum adaptation for school-based programs of career education. 

425. Methods and Materials in Early Childhood Education. 3 hrs. Offered concur- 
rently with student teaching (CIE 480), this general methods course examines materials and 
methods of teaching children in kindergarten through grade 3. 

427. Evaluation in Early Childhood Education. 3 hrs. Emphasis is placed on 
evaluative techniques and principles relative to the physical, intellectual, emotional, and 
social development of young children. 

480. Student Teaching in Lower Elementary. 9 hrs. Prerequisites: REF 300, CIE 
301 , 305, 306, 309, 311, EPY 370, 374. Taken together with CIE 425, students who student 
teach in kindergarren through grade 3 will register for this course. 

482. Student Teaching in Upper Elementary. 9 hrs. Prerequisites: REF 300, CIE 
301, 305, 306, 309, 312, EPT 370, 374. Taken together with CIE 343, students who student 
teach in grades 4 through 8 will register for this course. 

489. Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching. 6 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. Designed to meet the student teaching requirement for noncertified experienced 
teachers, this course deals with classroom management, programs of instruction, and stu- 
dent role in the educational environment. 

490. Workshop in Aviation Education. 3 hrs. Designed to familiarize teachers and 
administrators with the role that aviation and space exploration play in developing the 
school curriculum. May be taken twice for a total of six hours. 

491. The Reading Conference. I hr. An intensive three-day summer program con- 
sisting of lectures, group discussion, and demonstration lessons. May be taken three times. 

492. Internship in Kindergarten and Primary Education. 9 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: Permission of the Director of Interns. Reserved for those students who are enrolled in 
the internship program. 

493. Internship in the Middle School. 9 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the Director 
of Interns. Reserved for those students who are enrolled in the internship program. 

494. Workshop in Learning Resources in Early Childhood Education. 3 hrs. Student 
will become acquainted with learning sources, selection, use, and production multi media 
materials. 

496. Projects in Elementary Education I, II, III. 3 hrs. Designed for school systems 
planning local projects of curriculum revision and course of study construction. 



274/Course Descriptions 

SECONDARY EDUCATION (CIS— 120) 

301. Practicum in Secondary Education. 1 hr. A course designed to relate the study 
of theory to practical experience in a public school setting. May be repeated twice. 

310. Junior-Senior High School Reading Methods. 3 hrs. A course designed to 
familiarize secondary teachers with reading skills, methods, and materials. Emphasis is 
placed on content skills in subject matter areas. 

313. Principles of Teaching High School 3 hrs. This general methods course em- 
phasizes the goals of secondary education, motivation and direction of learning, and school 
organization. 

422. Curriculum Development for Career Education. 3 hrs. Introduction to prin- 
ciples of curriculum adaptation for school-based programs of career education. 

451. Methods in Business Education. 3 hrs. A study of business education trends and 
aims, teaching procedures, tests and measurements, special helps, and teaching materials. 

452. Methods in Art. 3 hrs. Stresses the aims, objectives, and methods of art educa- 
tion in the elementary and secondary schools. 

453. Methods in Industrial Arts. 3 hrs. A course pertaining to the methods and 
materials in the teaching of industrial arts. 

454. Methods in English — Secondary. 3 hrs. A course concerning methods of 
teaching English in the junior and senior high schools. 

455. Methods in Foreign Languages. 3 hrs. A course in methods of teaching French, 
Spanish, and German in the secondary schools. 

456. Methods in Teaching Science — Secondary. 3 hrs. A course designed to 
familiarize teachers with current trends, methods, and techniques of teaching science to 
secondary school students. 

457. Methods in Mathematics — Secondary. 3 hrs. A course designed to give the stu- 
dent a knowledge of the objectives, curriculum problems, and organization and methods of 
teaching secondary school mathematics. 

458. Methods in Social Studies — Secondary. 3 hrs. A study of the principal methods 
of teaching, application of psychological principles to teaching, and methods of selecting 
content and materials. 

459. Methods in Speech. 3 hrs. A general orientation to the teaching of speech, 
followed by individualized unit work in the special fields of speech. 

462. Methods and Principles in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. 3 

hrs. Emphasizes materials and techniques of teaching health, physical education, and 
recreation in grades 1 - 1 2 of public schools. 

465. Methods in Journalism. 3 hrs. A course designed to prepare the student for the 
teaching of journalism on the secondary school level. 

470. Curriculum of the Secondary Schools. 2 hrs. A course which examines the pre- 
sent day structure and nature of the secondary school curriculum. 

472. Student Activities in Secondary Schools. 1 hr. Consideration is given to the 
general nature, activities, and organization of the student extra-curricular program. 

481-494. Student Teaching in High School. 9 hrs. The individual courses in pre- 
service student teaching are as follows: 481 — Business Education; 482— Art Education; 
483— Industrial Arts; 484— English; 485— Foreign Languages; 486— Sciences; 487— 
Mathematics; 488— Social Studies; 489— Speech; 491 — Health, Physical Education, 
Recreation; 492— Library Science; 493 — Music Education; and 494— Journalism. 

495. Seminar in Secondary Student Teaching. 6 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. Designed to meet the student teaching requirements for noncertified experienced 
teachers, this course deals with classroom management, programs of instruction, and stu- 
dent role in (he educational environment. 



Economics/275 

496. Internship in Secondary Education. 9 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
Director of Interns. Reserved for those students who are enrolled in the internship pro- 
gram. 

ECONOMICS (ECO— 610) 

200. Introduction to Economics. 3 hrs. Not to be counted toward a major or meeting 
the core requirements of the College of Business Administration. Credit for graduation will 
not be given for both ECO 200 and 255 or 256. (JC 1113, 2123) 

255. Principles of Economics I. 3 hrs. An examination of the institutional environ- 
ment of American capitalism and the determination of the level of national income, 
employment, prices, and growth. (JC 21 13) 

256. Principles of Economics II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ECO 255. An examination of 
the laws of production and their influence on costs and output. Also, a study of product 
and factor price determination under varying degrees of competition and an analysis of in- 
ternational trade. (JC 2123, 2113) 

301. Elementary Statistics I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 101 or 112. Basic concepts; 
central tendency and dispersion; probability; Poisson, binomial and normal distributions; 
testing hypotheses. 

302. Elementary Statistics II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ECO 301. Decision making, 
classical and Bayesian; regression and correlation; index numbers and time series analysis. 

310. Economic History of the United States. 3 hrs. A study of the economic forces 
that have influenced the development of the United States from its European origins to the 
present. 

330. Money and Public Policy. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. A study of 
the nature and functions of money, monetary theory, and the political, social, and interna- 
tional context in which economic policy is formulated. 

335. Economics of the Firm. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. An in- 
termediate study of the application of economic theory to managerial decision-making. 

340. Price Theory. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. An intermediate study of 
the determination of prices in factor and final product markets. 

345. Income Theory. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. An intermediate study 
of the determination of income and employment. 

401. Public Finance. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. A study of federal and 
state spending and fund raising policies within the context of the social goals of the society. 

402. Public Policy Analysis. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255, 256, and 301. A study of 
the principles and tools of policy analysis in the public sector. 

413. The Economy of Latin America. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. 
Analysis of crucial Latin America economic issues: population, agriculture, industry, and 
trade. 

424. Economics of Urban Areas. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. A study of 
current problems of the cities — race, poverty, pollution, unemployment, crime, and 
government finance. 

435. International Trade Theory 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. A study of 
the historical development of international trade theory, the importance of international 
trade, and the mechanism of international payments. 

440. Economic Development. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. Emphasis on 
the economic tools for analyzing economic development with particular attention to 
regional growth and change. 

465. Economics of Labor. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. A study of the 
labor market with special reference to the institutional setting, wage determination, and 
employment problems in an industrial economy. 



276/Course Descriptions 

470. Comparative Economic Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. A 
course designed to acquaint the student with the origins, development, and characteristics 
of fascism, socialism, and capitalism. 

480. Environmental Economics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. A survey of 
economic concepts relevant to decision making with reference to the management of 
natural resources heretofore considered to be "free" in nature. 

492. Contemporary Economic Problems I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. 
Application of the tools of microeconomics to examine problems such as energy, pollution, 
income distribution, and market structure. 

494. Contemporary Economic Problems II. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 255 and 256. 
Application of the tools of macroeconomics to examine problems such as inflation, reces- 
sion, productivity, growth, and macroeconomic policy-making. 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (EPY— 180) 

370. Human Growth and Development, Part I: Child. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PSY110. 
Study of the child through the elementary school years, emphasizing principles and pro- 
blems of development. 

371. Psychology of Preadolescence and Early Adolescence. 3 hrs. The study of 
human growth and development during later elementary and junior high school years. 

372. Human Growth and Development Part II: Adolescent. 3 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: PSY 1 10. A course dealing with development of the individual through the adolescent 
years. 

374. Educational Psychology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PSY 110. Application of 
psychological methods, facts, and principles to education. 

385. Applied Behavior Analysis. 1-3 hrs. arr. Prerequisites: PSY 110, EPY 374, one 
of EPY 370, EPY 371, or EPY 372 and permission of the instructor. Application of the 
principles of applied behavior analysis to problems involving human behavior change in an 
educational context. 

470. Developmental and Educational Psychology for Teaching Interns. 9 hrs. arr. 
Available to internship students only, arranged through the Office of Student Teaching. 

482. Moral Development in Childhood and Adolescence. 3 hrs. May be taken up to 
nine hours with change of content. Prerequisites: PSY 1 10, and permission of the instruc- 



ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY (ELT— 398) 

101. Introduction to Electronics Technology I. 1 hr. Electronic laboratory skills: 
soldering, breadboarding, use of instruments, kit construction. 

102. Introduction to Electronics Technology II. 1 hr. Prerequisite: ELT 101. Con- 
tinuation of electric circuit assembly and testing skills. 

110. Network Analysis I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Physics 106. Basic electrical concepts 
and relationships. Analysis of simple DC and AC circuits. 

I10L. Network Laboratory I. 1 hr. 

111. Network Analysis II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ELT 110. Use of circuit analysis 
theorems and techniques to solve advanced AC and DC networks. 

MIL. Network Laboratory II. 1 hr. 

210. Electronic Devices and Circuits. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ELT 111. Theory and ap 
plication of solid state devices: diodes, junction and field-effect transistors. 

210L. Devices and Circuits I Laboratory. 1 hr. 

211. Electronic Devices and Circuits II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ELT 210. Multistage 
and large signal amplifiers, ICs, op amps, and oscillators. 



English/277 



211L. Devices and Circuits II Laboratory. 1 hr. 









220. Electronic Graphics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ELT 102, 1 1 1. Drafting principles, or- 
thographic projections, schematics, wiring diagrams, and symbols. 

230. Electronic Instrumentation. 3 hrs. Theory of operation and industrial use of 
common electronic instruments. 

240. Introduction to Digital Electronics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ELT 210. Theory and 
application of basic digital logic circuitry. 

313. Electronics Communications Systems. 3 hrs. Noise, propagation, antennas, 
AM, FM, pulse systems, Smith charts with applications. 

313-L. Electronic Communications Systems Laboratory. 1 hr. 

314. Design of High-Frequency Communications Circuits. 3 hrs. Design of com- 
munication circuits and systems; emphasis on bipolar device circuitry. 

314 L. Hi-Frequency Communications Laboratory. 1 hr. 

322. Logic Circuitry I. 3 hrs. Logic Circuit design; flip-flops, gates, counters, TTL, 
MOS, CMOS. 

322-L. Logic Circuitry I Laboratory. 1 hr. 

333. Logic Circuitry II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ELT 432. Applications of digital logic 
circuitry. Theory of microprocessors. 

333-L. Logic Circuitry II Laboratory. 1 hr. 

342. Electrical Energy Systems. 3 hrs. Advanced theoretical and applied methods for 
AC/DC motors and generators. 

392. Special Problems. 1 3 hrs. 

400. Senior Project. 3 hrs. arr. Prerequisite: Senior standing; approval of faculty 
adviser. Project should be in area of student's specialization. 

401. Senior Project. Continuation of ELT 400. 

411. Electronics for Scientists. 4 hrs. Practical electronics needed for maximum 
utilization of scientific instrumentation, automation, and logic circuits. 

412. Advanced Network Analysis. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 237. Network conven- 
tions, 2-port networks, La Place transforms. 

412 L Advanced Network Analysis Laboratory. 1 hr. 

470. Introduction to Control Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ELT 412 or permission of 
instructor. General control system theory and application; servomechanisms, operational 
amplifiers. 

470-L. Control Systems Laboratory. 1 hr. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. arr. Prerequisite: Senior standing; approval of 
faculty adviser. Supervised study in areas not covered by available courses. 



ENGLISH (ENG— 224) 

100. Fundamentals of Composition. 3 hrs. (May not count toward a major or 
minor.) Stresses grammar, mechanics, usage, and other basic writing skills. 

101 . Writing One. 3 hrs. Stresses clear, effective writing with special attention to syn- 
tactical and organizational skills. (JC 1113) 

102. Writing Two. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: English 101. Refines compositional skills 
and stresses additional rhetorical and research methods. (JC 1 123) 

203. World Masterpieces I. 3 hrs. Acquaints students with the great figures and 
works of Western literature. 



278/Course Descriptions 

204. World Masterpieces II. 3 hrs. Acquaints students with the great figures and 
works of Western literature. 

22?. Fiction Writing I. 3 hrs. Introduction to fiction writing. 

222. Poetry Writing I. 3 hrs. Introduction to poetry writing. 

300. Vocabulary Development. 3 hrs. (May not count toward major, but with per- 
mission of the English Department adviser may count toward the minor.) Stresses the im- 
provement of vocabulary. 

301 . Traditional Grammar. 3 hrs. Studies traditional grammar and usage. 

319. Literary Study of the Bible. 3 hrs. Examines the literary structure, style, and 
content of the English Bible. 

321. Fiction Writing II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: English 221. Stresses the techniques of 
short fiction writing. 

322. Poetry Writing II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: English 222. Stresses the techniques of 
poetry writing. 

332. Expository Prose. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: English 101 , 102. Stresses the writing of 
essays. 

333. Technical Writing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: English 101, 102; and junior standing or 
twelve hours in student's major field. Stresses report writing in student's major field. 

334. Introduction to Research and Term Paper Writing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: English 
101 , 102. Stresses data gathering and documentation in student's major field. 

340. Analysis of Literature. 3 hrs. Introduces the discipline of literary criticism. 

350. Survey of British Literature I. 3 hrs. Surveys major British literature from the 
Old English period to the Romantic period. 

351. Survey of British Literature II. 3 hrs. Surveys major British literature from 
Romantic period to the present. 

370. Survey of American Literature I. 3 hrs. Surveys American literature from its 
beginnings to the Civil War. 

371. Survey of American Literature II. 3 hrs. Surveys American literature from the 
Civil War to the present. 

372. Afro-American Literature. 3 hrs. Surveys major Black writers and their in- 
fluences. 

379. Survey of Contemporary Literature. 3 hrs. Surveys major contemporary writers 
and their influences. 

400. Introduction to Linguistics. 3 hrs. Introduces the principles of descriptive 
linguistics. 

401. Advanced Grammar. 3 hrs. Introduces structural and transformational gram- 
mar. (Required for secondary or middle-grade certification in English.) 

402. English Syntax. 3 hrs. Examines English syntax and conventional forms of 
English grammar. 

406. History of the English Language. 3 hrs. Surveys the development of the English 
language from Old English to the present. (Required for secondary or middle-grade cer- 
tification in English.) 

409. Studies in Linguistics. 3 hrs. Offers varied topics yearly. Repeatable to six 
hours. 

410. Readings in World Literature I. 3 hrs. Examines various Greek, Roman, 
Medieval, and Renaissance writers. 

41 1. Readings in World Literature II. 3 hrs. Examines various European Enlighten- 
ment, Romantic, and Modern writers. 



English/279 

413. The Modern Novel. 3 hrs. Examines major British and Continental novels of 
the last hundred years. 

417. Modern Drama. 3 hrs. Studies important British and Continental dramas of the 
twentieth century. 

419. Studies in World Literature. 3 hrs. Studies Continental, British, and American 
writers of the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries. Repeatable to nine hours. 

421. Fiction Writing III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: English 221 and 321. Provides an op- 
portunity to develop techniques of poetry writing. Repeatable to nine hours. 

422. Poetry Writing III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: English 222 and 322. Provides an op- 
portunity to develop techniques of poetry writing. Repeatable to nine hours. 

425. Readings in the Theory of Fiction. 3 hrs. Studies theories and forms of contem- 
porary fiction. Repeatable to six hours. 

426. Readings in the Theory of Poetry. 3 hrs. Studies theories and forms of contem- 
porary poetry. Repeatable to six hours. 

451. Chaucer. 3 hrs. Emphasizes a close reading of The Canterbury Tales. 

454. Shakespeare's Comedies and Tragicomedies. 3 hrs. Studies a selected group of 
Shakespeare's drama. 

455. Shakespeare's Histories and Tragedies. 3 hrs. Studies a selected group of 
Shakespeare's drama. 

456. Sixteenth-Century English Literature. 3 hrs. Studies the more important English 
writers of this period. 

457. The Development of British Drama to 1642. 3 hrs. Studies English drama from 
its beginning to 1642, exclusive of Shakespeare. 

458. Seventeenth-Century Prose and Poetry. 3 hrs. Surveys the period 1600-1660, 
with emphasis on the "schools" of Donne and Jonson. 

459. Milton. 3 hrs. Studies the poetry and prose of Milton, with emphasis on the ma- 
jor works. 

460. British Literature, 1600-1740. 3 hrs. Surveys British Literature from the Restora- 
tion to 1740. 

462. British Literature, 1740-1798. 3 hrs. Surveys British Literature from 1740 to 
1798. 

464. The British Novel to 1900. 3 hrs. Studies the development of British fiction 
from Richardson through Hardy. 

465. Nineteenth-Century British Literature: Romantic. 3 hrs. Surveys poetry and 
prose of the period 1 790 to 1 830. 

466. Nineteenth-Century British Literature: Victorian. 3 hrs. Surveys poetry and 
prose of the period 1 830 to 1 900. 

467. Twentieth-Century British Literature. 3 hrs. Studies major twentieth century 
British writers, emphasizing novelists and dramatists. 

468. Modern British Poetry. 3 hrs. Surveys major British poets from Hardy to the 
present. 

469. Studies in British Literature. 3 hrs. Examines various topics in British 
Literature. Repeatable to nine hours. 

470. The American Literary Renaissance, 1820-1870. 3 hrs. Examines the writings of 
Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and others. 

471. The Rise of Realism in American Literature, 1870-1920. 3 hrs. Examines 
American Literature after the Civil War, focusing on the terms realism and naturalism. 



280/Course Descriptions 

472. American Drama. 3 hrs. Studies American drama from its beginnings to the 
present, with emphasis on the twentieth century. 

477. The American Novel 1920 to 1960. 3 hrs. Studies techniques and historical 
backgrounds of the major novelists. 

478. Modern American Poetry. 3 hrs. Surveys major American poets from Whitman 
to the present. 

485. Literature of the South. 3 hrs. Emphasizes the fiction, poetry, and drama of 
twentieth-century Southern writers. 

489. Studies in American Literature. 3 hrs. Studies notable movements, genres, and 
problems of American literature. Repeatable to nine hours. 

492. Special problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Provides the op- 
portunity to pursue a special topic or area of interest. 

CIS 454. Methods in English— Secondary. 3 hrs. Presents methods of teaching 
language, literature, and composition in secondary schools. 

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (EVD— 812) 

140. Environmental Design I. 3 hrs. An introduction to the field of interior designing 
with emphasis on processes and resources of the designer. 

221 . Floral Design. 3 hrs. Fundamentals of floral arrangement and design. 

240. Environmental Design II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: EVD 140. The exploration and 
application of design methodology to interior environments. 

241. Environmental Design III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 102 and EVD 240; ART 
1 1 1 recommended. The application of varied media and techniques in depicting interior en- 
vironments. 

331. Textile Design: Fabric Surface Enrichment. 3 hrs. Exploration of the basic 
methods and processes of fabric decoration — screen printing, resist, block, direct, etc. 

332. Fabric Design II. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: EVD 140 and ART 111. Design by the 
weaving process. 

340. Residential Interiors. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: EVD 241; HHM 339 recommended. 
Advanced problems in space planning, human factors and the application of design prin- 
ciples. 

342. Practicum. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: EVD 340. Study made of a specific interior 
designing problem with the community. 

440. Commercial and Institutional Interiors. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: EVD 241. Design 
problems involving large scale interiors with emphasis on commerical and institutional pro- 
jects. 

441. Professional Practices and Procedures. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MKT 330, 342, 
365. Application of the aspects of business to the interior design profession. 

442. Interior Design Internship. 6 hrs. Prerequisites: EVD 241, 340, and 441. A 
practicum for the interior design student in a working-training situation with a professional 
interior designer. 

492. Special Problems. 1-6 hrs. Directed individual study. 

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY (ESC— 335) 

105. Environmental Problems I, II. 1 hr. Current calculations encountered in en- 
vironmental monitoring and environmental impact estimations. 

205. Environmental Problems III, IV. 1 hr. Intermediate applied calculations 
relating to environmental monitoring, and environmental impact estimations. 

301. Man in His Environment. 3 hrs. Physical, biological, social, political, and 
economic problems associated with current environmental issues. 



Food and Nutrition/281 

302. Environmental Improvement Project. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ESC 301. Perform- 
ing an actual environmental improvement project. 

330. Principles of Environmental Health. 3 hrs. Environmental factors relating to 
transmission of communicable disease, chemical, and physical hazards to man. 

401. Water Pollution Detection. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 311 or permission of in- 
structor. Field sampling and testing for water and air pollution. 

402. Air Pollution Detection. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 31 1 , ESC 401 , or permission 
of instructor. Continuation of ESC 401 with emphasis on air pollution. 

403. Air, Water, and Solid Waste Management. 4 hrs. Current methods for the con- 
trol of air and water pollution as well as the management of solid waste. 

405. Environmental Impact Statements. 3 hrs. Preparation of environmental impact 
statements, EIS's for projects with significant environmental impact. 

431. Principles of Industrial Hygiene. 4 hrs. Detection and control of harmful agents 
in working environments, such as vapors, gases, mists, radiation, and sound. 

492. Special Projects. 1-3 hrs. 

FINANCE (FIN— 615) 

301. Financial Concepts in Industry. 3 hrs. Designed to acquaint the undergraduate 
technology student with the basic principles of financial administration as applied to in- 
dustry. Not open to students in the College of Business Administration. 

320. Personal Finance. 3 hrs. A study of the financial problems people encounter in 
planning and managing their individual affairs. 

350. Bank Administration. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ECO 330. A comprehensive survey 
of the management of bank funds. 

352. Principles of Investments. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FIN 389. Introduction to securi- 
ty analysis and portfolio theory. 

355. Problems in Bank Administration. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FIN 350. Indepth 
analysis, mainly by the case method, of issues relating to bank problems. 

389. Business Finance. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ACC 202 and ECO 256. Deals with 
financial management issues. Emphasis is placed on basic tools and methods of the finan- 
cial managers. 

400. Quantitative Analysis in Finance. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GBA 290 and ECO 302. 
Application of quantitative methods for business decision making applied to the COM- 
PUSTAT financial data files. 

462. Security Analysis. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FIN 352. A research course designed to 
examine the international, national, industrial, and corporate effect on expected micro- 
stock prices. 

472. International Business Finance. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FIN 389. Concerned with 
the short- and long-haul and long-run financial operations and specific cash and capital 
management problems of multi-national business. 

480. Financial Management. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FIN 389. High-level analysis of in- 
ternal and external financial decision-making issues. 

492. Independent Study. 3 hrs. Special research assignment designed to meet the 
needs of the particular student. 

FOOD AND NUTRITION (FN— 815) 

163. Food Study. 3 hrs. Study of food science principles and their application in the 
preparation of foods and food products. (JC 1213, 1242) 

260. Human Nutrition. 3 hrs. The nutritional needs of the body and proper selection 
of foods to meet these needs. 



282/Course Descriptions 

261. Meal Planning and Table Service. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FN 163. Emphasis on 
management of time, energy, and money in selection and purchasing of foods, meal plan- 
ning, preparation, and serving. (JC 2213) 

265. Orientation to Dietetics. 1 hr. Study of dietetics and careers in the profession. 

360. Basic Nutrition. 2 hrs. Nutritional needs of body and proper selection of foods 
emphasized. 

362. Nutrition. 3 hrs. Study of the body's need for foods, including the chemistry of 
digestion, metabolism, and nutritive requirements of body during life cycle. 

363. Child Nutrition. 3 hrs. A study of nutritive requirements for young children. 

364. Teaching Food and Nutrition in the Elementary Grades. 3 hrs. Course planned 
to give understanding of materials and methods for teaching nutrition at this level. 

365. Normal and Therapeutic Nutrition. 4 hrs. Nutrition in health and disease 
through the life cycle. 

430. Experimental Foods. 3 hrs. Elementary research to determine factors affecting 
standard products. 

460. Advanced Nutrition. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FN 362. Study of current literature 
for new findings in the field of nutrition. 

461. Diet in Disease. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FN 460. Study of diseases influenced by 
diet and dietary treatment of diseases. 

462. Food Preservation. 3 hrs. Study of methods and techniques of preserving foods 
and its storage. Convenience foods studies. 

463. Applied Community Nutrition. 6 hrs. A study of community nutrition, 
resources, and programs. 

464. Clinical Nutrition. 10 hrs. Clinical experiences in the area of dietetics. 

465. Seminar. 1 hr. Readings in nutrition and diet therapy and the relation to 
disease. 

466. Diet Therapy. 12 hrs. Study and application of principles, techniques, and 
modification of therapeutic diets. 

492. Special Problems in Food and Nutrition. 1-4 hrs. arr. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing and permission of the instructor. 



FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (FST— 396) 

101. Introduction to Food Science. 3 hrs. Examination of the food industry and its 
development. A discussion of basic food constituents, and food quality and it measure- 
ment. 

310. Food Science I. 3 hrs. Physical, biochemical, and microbiological properties of 
important classes of food products as they relate to food processing. 

311. Food Science II. 3 hrs. Materials and methods applicable to foods industries in 
regard to additives, packaging, sanitation, and quality control. 

350. Food Processing Technology. 2 hrs. General characterisitcs of food materials; 
methods of preservation; processing objectives; packaging; and sanitation. 

350-L. Food Processing Technology Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

351. Food Processing Technology II. 2 hrs. Continuation of FST 350. 

351-1,. Food Processing Technology II Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

405. Food Process Engineering. 3 hrs. Application of chemical engineering prin- 
ciples in food processing. 



Foreign Languages/283 

410. Food and Drug Laws-Standards and Regulations. 3 hrs. Federal, state, and city 
food and drug laws, and how they regulate the food industry. 

450. Food Analysis I. 2 hrs. Principles and regulation of official chemical, 
microbiological, and physical methods used in food analysis. 

450-L. Food Analysis I Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

451. Food Analysis II. 2 hrs. Continuation of FST 450. 
451-L. Food Analysis II Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

489. Seminar. 1 hr. arr. Discussion of current topics in food science and technology. 
492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES (FL— 228) 
100. English as a Foreign Langauge. 3 hrs. *Credit not applicable toward degree. 

111. Beginning French I. 3 hrs. (JC 1 1 13) 

112. Beginning French II. 3 hrs. (JC 1 123) 

121. Beginning German I. 3 hrs. (JC 1313) 

122. Beginning German II. 3 hrs. (JC 1323) 

131. Beginning Greek I. 3 hrs. 

132. Beginning Greek II. 3 hrs. 

141. Beginning Italian I. 3 hrs. 

142. Beginning Italian II. 3 hrs. 

151. Beginning Latin I. 3 hrs. (JC 1413) 

152. Beginning Latin II. 3 hrs. (JC 1423) 

161. Beginning Russian I. 3 hrs. 

162. Beginning Russian II. 3 hrs. 

171. Beginning Spanish I. 3 hrs. (JC 1213) 

172. Beginning Spanish II. 3 hrs. (JC 1223) 

211. Intermediate French I. 3 hrs. (JC 21 13) 

212. Intermediate French II. 3 hrs. (JC 2123) 

221. Intermediate German I. 3 hrs. (JC 2313) 

222. Intermediate German II. 3 hrs. (JC 2323) 

241 . Intermediate Italian I. 3 hrs. 

242. Intermediate Italian II. 3 hrs. 

251. Intermediate Latin I. 3 hrs. (JC 2413) 

252. Intermediate Latin II. 3 hrs. (JC 2423) 

261. Intermediate Russian I. 3 hrs. 

262. Intermediate Russian II. 3 hrs. 

271. Intermediate Spanish I. 3 hrs. (JC 2213) 

272. Intermediate Spanish II. 3 hrs. (JC 2223) 

*This and many other FL courses incorporate language activities during and in addition to 
classroom instruction. Since the proportion varies with a given course, laboratory hours are 
not specified. 



284/Course Descriptions 

301. Credit for Study Abroad. 3-9 hrs. Prerequisites: Intermediate knowledge of the 
language to be studied; prior arrangements for evaluation and receipt of credit. Credit will 
be granted for systematic study of the language and culture of the language and literature 
of a foreign area. Study must be under the direction of a recognized teaching institution ap- 
proved in advance by the Department of Foreign Languages. The department will examine 
and grade the progress and achievement of the participants in this program before granting 
credit. 

305. Mythology. 3 hrs. Topics may vary; to include the development of Greek and 
Roman, Teutonic, or Celtic mythology illustrated by examples from art and literature. 

311. French Conversation and Phonetics. 3 hrs. 

313. Reading French. 3 hrs. An introduction to the study of French prose, poetry, 
drama; techniques of literary analysis; continued study of French language. 

321 . German Converstion and Phonetics. 3 hrs. 

323. Reading German. 3 hrs. An introduction . to reading German literature and 
other documents for comprehension and literary analysis. 

333. Greek Civilization and Literature in Translation. 3 hrs. 

353. Latin Civilization and Literature in Translation. 3 hrs. 

371 . Spanish Coversation and Phonetics. 3 hrs. 

373. Reading Spanish. 3 hrs. Readings in the com temporary short story, discussion 
of literary techniques, composition. 

400. Introduction to Exotic Languages. 3 hrs. May be taken for a total of six (6) 
hours. 

401. Advanced Credit for Study Abroad. 3-9 hrs. arr. Prerequisites: Advanced 
knowledge of the language to be studied; otherwise same as FL 301 . (See FL 301 .) 

403. Translation. 3 hrs. 

404. Methods of Teaching Foreign Language. 3 hrs. May be taken for a total of six 
(6) hours. 

406. Foreign Language Film. 1 or 3 hrs. Study of literary and liguistic aspects of 
foreign films in a given foreign language. 

411. Modern France. 3 hrs. Contemporary French education, social attitudes, 
politics, urban and rural life. 

412. Advanced French. 3 hrs. Advanced study of French grammar and stylistics; 
composition; reading and stylistic analysis. 

413. Studies in French Literature. 3 hrs. May be taken for a total of nine (9) hours if 
topics vary. Topics include nineteenth century drama and poetry, twentieth century drama, 
nineteenth and twentieth century novel, and seventeenth century literature. 

415. History of French Literature. 3 hrs. A historical survey focusing on poetics and 
literary criticism. 

421. Modern Germany. 3 hrs. A cultural survey of the German-speaking areas in 
postwar Europe. 

422. Advanced German. 3 hrs. Advanced study of German grammar and stylistics; 
composition; reading and stylistic analysis. 

423. Studies in German Literature. 3 hrs. May be taken for a total of nine (9) hours if 
topics vary. Topics include the age of Goethe, German realism and naturalism, twentieth 
century literature. 

425. History of German Literature. 3 hrs. An historical survey focusing on poetics 
and literary criticism. 

431. Advanced Greek I. 3 hrs. 



Fundamentals of Science/285 

432. Advanced Greek II. 3 hrs. 

435. Readings in Greek Literature. 3 hrs. 

455. Readings in Latin Literature. 3 hrs. 

471. Modern Spain and Latin America. 3 hrs. A survey of the cultural background 
of Spain and Latin America. 

472. Advanced Spanish. 3 hrs. Review of basic grammar, progressing to more 
sophisticated aspects; idiom study; composition. 

473. Studies in Hispanic Literature. 3 hrs. May be taken for a total of nine (9) hours 
if topics vary. Topics include the Generation of '98, the realist novel, Golden Age drama, 
Cervantes, and survey of Latin American Literature. 

475. History of Hispanic Literature. 3 hrs. A historical survey focusing on poetics 
and literary criticism. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. May be taken for a total of nine (9) hours. 

FORENSIC SCIENCE (FSC— 375) 

340. Forensic Science I. 3 hrs. An introductory study of the techniques employed in 
forensic laboratories. 

340-L. Forensic Science I Laboratory. 1 hr. 

341 . Forensic Science II. 3 hrs. A continuation of FSC 340. 

341 -L. Forensic Science II Laboratory. 1 hr. 

440. Drug Indentification. 3 hrs. Lectures, demonstrations and discussions covering 
all aspects of drug identification, emphasizing those relating to law enforcement, are 
presented. 

442. Arson and Explosives. 3 hrs. Introduction to the investigation of arson and 
bombings. 

442-L. Arson and Explosives Laboratory. 1 hr. 

491. Special Projects in Forensic Science. 2 hrs. Individual studies in forensic science 
principles. 

491 -L. Laboratory for Forensic Science 491. 2 hrs. Hands-on experience with true 
forensic science situations. 

FUNDAMENTALS OF SCIENCE (FS— 390) 

Fundamentals of Science: Two courses in general physical science and two courses in 
general biological science of three semester hours credit for each. These courses are design- 
ed to give the non-science major an acquaintance and understanding of certain fundamen- 
tal principles of the major science disciplines. 

Inasmuch as there is overlapping and duplication in these courses and those offered by 
other science department of this and other institutions, the student should check carefully 
with his adviser and/or the Department of Science Education prior to enrolling in these 
courses. 

104. Physical Science I. 3 hrs. A study of matter and energy in the universe; the 
forces acting within the universe; and the laws governing these phenomena. (JC 2213) 

105. Physical Science II. 3 hrs. The study of elementary and compound substances, 
the arrangement of forces acting on these substances in the universe. (JC 2223) 

106. Biological Science I. 3 hrs. Studies in the general life science with emphasis on 
the systems of Man. 

107. Biological Science II. 3 hrs. Studies of the diversity of life in plants and animals. 



286/Course Descriptions 

131. General Physical Science I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Elementary Education major, 
MAT 210. Study of the interaction of matter and energy. 

132. General Physical Science II. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Elementary Education major, 
FS 131. Study of the interaction of matter and energy. 

133. General Biological Science I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Elementary Education major. 
A study of the basic patterns of life and a modern system of classifying organisms. 

134. General Biological Science II. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Elementary Education ma- 
jor, FS 133. A study of interaction between organisms with their environment. 

GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (GBA— 616) 

100. Introduction to Business. 3 hrs. An introductory course to practically all phases 
of the business world. Not open to juniors and seniors enrolled in the College of Business 
Administration. (JC 1 1 13) 

290. Fundamentals of FORTRAN. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 101. Application of in- 
ternally stored digital computers to business problems through the use of the FORTRAN 
language. (JC 1214) 

295. The Legal Environment of Business. 3 hrs. A study of the interrelationship of 
law and society and the impact of jurisprudence upon business activity. (JC 2413) 

311. Advanced Business Law. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GBA 295. A detailed emphasis on 
selected legal topics particularly related to business activity. 

375. Managerial Communications. 3 hrs. Effective principles and practices of writ- 
ten communications and their functional translations in terms of audience evaluation. 

415. Government and Business. 3 hrs. A study of the place of government in the 
business world with emphasis on controls, regulation, enforcement of competition and sub- 
sidies. 

440. Transportation. 3 hrs. The principles, practices and problems of transportation 
that prevail in the United States. 

GENETICS (GEN— 312) 

101. Heredity and Human Affairs. 3 hrs. Foundations of human reproductive and 
hereditary interrelationships and their significance in social, ethical, and moral problems. 

402. Genetics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MIC 101 or BIO 101; one semester of organic 
chemistry recommended. The fundamental principles of heredity. 

403. Advanced Genetics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GEN 402. A continuation of GEN 402. 

404. Genetic Techniques. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: GEN 402 or concurrent with GEN 
402. Laboratory exercises to illustrate basic genetic principles. 

411. Physiological Genetics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GEN 402, 403. Physiological con- 
cepts of heredity. 

421. Interpretation of Biological Data. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Techniques applicable to the design and interpretation of biological research. 

451. Medical Genetics. 3 hrs. The basic principles of human genetics with emphasis 
on the causation of abnormality and disease. 

461. Microbial Genetics. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: GEN 402, 403. The genetics and 
molecular biology of microoorganisms and viruses. 

461 -L. Micro Genetics Laboratory. 2 hrs. To be taken concurrently with GEN 461 . 

461 -L. Microbial Genetics Laboratory. 2 hrs. To be taken concurrently with GEN 
461. 

492. Special Problems I, II, III. 2-6 hrs. A course in library and/or laboratory 
research selected in consultation with the adviser. 



Geography/287 

GEOGRAPHY AND AREA DEVELOPMENT (GHY— 268) 

102. Introduction to Geography. 3 hrs. Introduction to the basic elements and con- 
cepts of geography. 

103. World Regional Geography. 3 hrs. Introduction to world regional geography 
with emphasis on man's relation to the land. (JC 1113, 1 123) 

310. Principles of Cartography. 3 hrs. Theory and construction of maps from com- 
pilation through reproduction: projection design, symbols, and techniques. 

317. Maps and Map Interpretation. 3 hrs. Categories of maps and their utilization to 
include classification of projections, design, structure, measurement, and methods of inter- 
pretation. 

323. Weather and Climate. 3 hrs. Survey of elements of weather and climate; em- 
phasis on processes, distribution patterns, and impact on man. 

324. Geography of Landforms. 3 hrs. Study of structure, process, and stage of 
geometric configurations of earth's land surface and influences exerted on human activity. 

331. Cultural Systems in the Environment. 3 hrs. Geographical analysis of man's in- 
teraction with environment through time; considers spatial significance and distribution of 
various cultural elements. 

341. World Political Geography. 3 hrs. Geographic approach to patterns of power 
arid conflict among nations. Consideration of strategic areas, disputed zones, and regional 
blocs. 

350. Introduction to Economic Geography. 3 hrs. Principles of economic geography 
as developed through regional studies of characteristics and areal associations of economic 
phenomena 

360. Introduction to Community and Regional Planning. 3 hrs. A review of the fun- 
damentals and historic development of community and regional planning. 

361. Regional Planning and Development. 3 hrs. An introduction to the concepts, 
techniques, and procedures of regional planning and development. 

370. Conservation of Natural Resources. 3 hrs. An analysis of basic principles and 
problems associated with the use, misuse, and conservation of natural resources. 

400. Geography of Mississippi. 3 hrs. Survey of physical, economic, and historical 
geography of the state; emphasis on man-environment relations and problems. 

402. Geography of the United States and Canada. 3 hrs. Introduction to physical 
and human geography of U.S. and Canada; emphasis on natural resources and patterns of 
economic activity. 

403. Geography of South America. 3 hrs. Analysis of settlement forms, resource 
potential, and development problems and progress by political units. 

404. Geography of the Caribbean Countries. 3 hrs. An historic-geographical ap- 
proach analyzing spatial relations of cultures and economies in the Caribbean realm. 

405. Geography of the USSR. 3 hrs. A regional survey of the physical, economic, 
and cultural geography of the USSR. 

406. Geography of Europe. 3 hrs. Topical and regional study of Europe; emphasis 
on industrial, trade, urban, and other cultural patterns. 

407. Geography of Asia. 3 hrs. Analysis of physical and cultural environments of 
monsoon Asia; includes evaluation of area's resource and development potential. 

408. Geography of Africa. 3 hrs. Regional synthesis of physical and cultural features 
which characterize the African Continent. 

410. Advanced Cartography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GHY 310. Map reproduction 
techniques, color preparation, scribing, and quantitative symbolization. 

411. Aerial Photography Interpretation. 3 hrs. Systematic treatment of elements and 
steps involved in interpreting, measuring, and mapping of images appearing on aerial 
photographs. 



288/Course Descriptions 

412. Remote Sensing of the Environment. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GHY 411 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Survey of theory and application of remotely-sensed imageries generated 
from aircraft and spacecraft for geographic, environment, and planning purposes. 

413. Field Methods in Geography. 3 hrs. Consideration of basic methods of 
geographic analysis used in classifying, analyzing, and reporting field-gathered data. 

415. Quantitative Methods in Spatial Analysis. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: A basic course in 
statistical methods. Application of statistical and other quantitative techniques to problems 
of spatial analysis. 

416. Computer Applications in Geography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: One course in FOR- 
TRAN programming. Study and application of computer mapping as a tool of geographic 
analysis. 

422. Geography of Soils. 3 hrs. Study of formulation, distribution, and use of soils; 
emphasis on soils of south Mississippi; fieldwork and laboratory analysis. 

425. Environmental Climatology. 3 hrs. Study of climatological aspects of at- 
mospheric pollution; includes chemical, medical, legal, economic, and community- 
planning dimensions of air pollution. 

427. Meteorology. 3 hrs. Study of the temporal and areal variations in composition, 
structure, and working of the atmosphere. Practice in use of instruments and 
measurements. 

428. Synoptic Meteorology. 3 hrs. Analysis of air masses; principles of weather 
forecasting; drawing and interpretation of daily weather maps; and making weather 
forecasts. 

432. Environmental Perception. 3 hrs. An analysis of man's perception of his 
cultural-social environment; considers both the physical and man-made landscape. 

435. Historical Geography of the U.S. 3 his. Study of evolution of cultural land- 
scapes of the area now comprising the United States; emphasis on processes of change. 

440. Population and Human Resources. 3 hrs. A geographical analysis of the 
biological and cultural characteristics of population. 

451. Industrial Location Analysis. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GHY 350 or permission of in- 
structor. Principles of industrial location analysis; emphasis on theory, locational decision- 
making, and regional location of manufacturing, 

452. Rural Land Use and Settlement. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GHY 350 or permission of 
instructor. Study of characteristic ways that man utilizes rural land — including settlement, 
landholding, and agricultural patterns. 

453. Transportation and Land Use. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GHY 350 or permission of 
instructor. Study of the various transportation modes and the effect they have on contem- 
porary development problems. 

460. Urban Geography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GHY 350 or permission of instructor. 
Review of urban development, processes contributing to development, and effect these pro- 
cesses have on cities. 

461. Socioeconomic Planning. 3 hrs. Compilation, analyses and projection of 
population, and economic variables as they relate to community and regional planning. 

462. Environmental Planning. 3 hrs. A detailed study of environmental planning 
analysis and methodology as an element in land-use decision-making systems. 

463. Transportation and Community Facilities. 3 hrs. Examination of community 
facility and transportation planning and how they relate to the greater goals of the in- 
dividual and society. 

464. Housing and Land Use Planning. 3 hrs. Examination and analysis of housing 
and land use patterns in community and regional planning. 

465. Programming and Land Use Regulations. 3 hrs. Consideration of various legal 
and institutional tools related to implementation of community and regional plans. 



Geology/289 

466. Public Policy and the Planning Process. 3 Mrs. Deals with function of planning 
process in formulating effective public policy for development of communities and regions. 

469. Studio-Laboratory: Plan Preparation. 3 hrs. Preparation and presentation of a 
professional plan as a collaborative community/student group effort. May be repeated 
with change of content for a total of six (6) hours. 

472. Forest Resource Management. 3 hrs. Study of forest-management principles 
and practices related to both private and public forest holdings. 

473. Water Resources. 3 hrs. Study of hydrologic processes and their application to 
needs of cities, industry, agriculture, and recreation. 

474. Watershed Management. 3 hrs. Investigation of watersheds as planning and 
management units; emphasis on relationship of water to other resources. Game theory us- 
ed. 

475. Coastal Zone Management. 3 hrs. Study of coastal-zone problems and con- 
flicts; emphasis on multiple-objective planning and resource-management procedures. 

491. Geography and Planning Internship. 1-9 hrs. May be repeated for a total of 
nine hours. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. May be repeated for a total of six hours. 

GEOLOGY (GLY— 340) 

101. Physical Geology. 3 hrs. The physical processes in and materials of man's en- 
vironment. An introductory course. (JC 1113) 

101-L. Physical Geology Laboratory. 1 hr. Pre- or Corequisite: GLY 101. An 
elementary study of rocks, minerals, and maps. ( JC 1111) 

103. Historical Geology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GLY 101. A study of earth history as 
revealed in the character and fossil content of rocks. (JC 1 123) 

103-L. Historical Geology Laboratory. 1 hr. Introduction to the study of fossils and 
interpretation of geologic maps. Field trips may be required. (JC 1 121) 

301. Mineralogy I. 4 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 101, CHE 101, 102. Elements of 
crystallography, silicate structure, and determinative mineralogy. 

304. Petrology. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: GLY 301. Principles of rock genesis, lithology, 
taxonomy, and recognition. 

306. Environmental Geology. 3 hrs. Material and energy systems as they relate to 
man and his environmental problems. 

308. Structural Geology. 4 hrs. Principles of rock deformation; field trips. Prerequi- 
sites: GLY 103 and MAT 103. 

310. Geomorphology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 101 ,. 101-L. Study of geologic pro- 
cesses involved in landscape development. 

341. Invertebrate Paleontology. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: GLY 103, 103-L. Taxonomy, 
morphological features, and geologic distribution of invertebrate fossils. 

401. Principles of Stratigraphy. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 301, 308, 341 , or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

404. Coal Petrology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 403 or permission of instructor. A 
study of origin, coalification and maceral composition of coal and the application to pro- 
blems of paleobotany, oil and gas prospecting and fuel technology. 

403. Optical Mineralogy. 4 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 301 and MAT 103. Introduction 
to optical mineralogy, and thin section study of rocks using polarizing microscope. 

405. Sedimentology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GLY 301, 403. Origin of sedimentary par- 
ticles, sedimentary structures and classification of sedimentary rocks. 



290/Course Descriptions 

410. Elements of Geochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 301, 304. Chemical pro- 
cesses in the environment as a guide to environmental analysis and geological synthesis. 

415. Clay Mineralogy. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 101 and CHE 102. Origin, struc- 
ture, and chemistry of clays, identification techniques, clay-water systems, soil formation 
and engineering techniques. 

420. Elements of Geophysics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 101, MAT 103, PHY 102 
(or 202), and consent of instructor. Applications of physics to geological investigations. 

422. Geophysical Well-Logging. 3 hrs. Principles of obtaining data from bore hole 
instruments, and geological interpretation of data. Laboratory included. 

426. Advanced Geophysics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: PHY 102, 106, or 202. Corequisite: 
MAT 277. Physical principles governing gravity, and seismic exploration. 

443. Micropaleontology I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GLY 341. Taxonomy, morphology, 
and stratigraphic use of Foraminifera; field trips. 

450. Introductory Oceanography. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 103, CHE 102, PHY 
102, and consent of instructor. Basic principles of geological oceanography. 

452. Physical Marine Geology. 3 hrs. Gulf Coast Research Laboratory. Prere- 
quisites: GLY 101, 103. Geological processes, sedimentary environments, and geomor- 
phological features of Gulf Coast. 

454. Chemical Marine Geology. 3 hrs. Gulf Coast Research Laboratory. Prerequi- 
sites: GLY 103, 301, and CHE 102. Supervised research on the chemistry of the coastal 
waters of Mississippi and geochemistry of the bottoms. 

470. Petroleum Geology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 304, 308, 401, or permission of 
instructor. The origin, occurrence, and accumulation of oil and natural gas; field trips. 

474. Geological Excursion. 1 hr. Field studies of geological phenomena in areas 
remote from the campus, by means of 8 to 10 day field trips during scheduled breaks. 

476. Hydrology. 3 hrs. An introduction to the origin, distribution, movement and 
properties of the waters of the earth. 

480. Introduction to Geological Field Work. 1 hr. Practice in use of Brunton com- 
pass, plane table and alidade, geological map-making, recording field data, and keeping 
field notes. 

492. Special Problems in Geology. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Senior standing and per- 
mission of the chairman. Independent study or research. 

HEALTH AND SAFETY EDUCATION (HSE— 715) 

101 . Personal Health. 3 hrs. An examination of the relationships of various life-style 
components to various levels of health. (JC 1213) 

210. Introduction to Health Education. 3 hrs. A study of the health education pro- 
fession, specialties, manpower, and philosophies. 

310. First Aid. 2 hrs. Standard First Aid as approved by the American Red Cross. 

311. Emergency Health Care. 3 hrs. Standard First Aid plus advanced study certify- 
ing personnel to conduct first aid courses in school and community. (School of HPER 
Core) 

315. Anatomical Structures Related to Movement. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BIO 101 and 
102. A study of the anatomical structures pertinent to human movement. 

321. Community Health. 3 hrs. Community control of environment health hazards 
and diseases; health agencies. 

341. Safety. 3 hrs. Accident problems, safety programs, and methods of prevention. 

342. Education for Safe Living. 3 hrs. Curriculum development, community 
resources, and audiovisual materials for teaching safety. 



Health/291 

409. Community Health Education Methods. 3 hrs. Planning techniques, behavioral 
objectives, content selection, motivational theory, educational strategies and evaluation. 

410. School Health Education Methods. 3 hrs. Scope and sequence review, 
behavioral objectives, content selection, and a variety of education strategies for levels K- 
12. 

411. Health Education Curriculum for Secondary Schools. 3 hrs. Varieties of cur- 
riculum organization, scope and sequence, survey of educational content, facilities and 
equipment. 

412. Measurement and Evaluation in Health Education. 3 hrs. A survey of evalua- 
tion instruments for appraising and interpreting health data. 

414. Consumer Health. 3 hrs. A survey of consumer problems related to health 
misconceptions, choosing health services, medical quackery, and advertising of health pro- 
ducts. 

415. School Health. 3 hrs. Organization and operation of school health programs 
with emphasis on policies, procedures, problems, and field work. 

420. Communicable and Chronic Disease in Man. 3 hrs. Problems, control, and 
prevention of communicable and chronic disease in modern society. 

421. Sanitation. 3 hrs. Sanitation in the home and school, in food production, water 
supply, waste, and excreta disposal. 

422. Drugs in Society. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: HSE 101 or permission of instructor. 
Psychosocial, medical, legal, and health aspects of drugs and their abuse. 

423. Curriculum Development in Alcohol Education. 3 hrs. An analysis of 
alcoholism, instructional approaches, and community resources for teaching alcohol 
misuse and abuse. 

430. Marriage and Human Sexuality. 3 hrs. Physical, emotional, and medical bases 
for successful courtship, marriage, and parenthood. 

435. Mental Health Education. 3 hrs. A survey of the content and teaching strategies 
for mental health education. 

440. Introduction to Driver Education. 3 hrs. Critical analysis of traffic accidents, 
attitude factors, essential knowledge of automobile operation and traffic law. 

441. Traffic Safety Education. 3 hrs. An in-depth study of the major problems in 
traffic safety, including driver, pedestrian, engineering, and enforcement. 

442. Laboratory Programs in Driver Education. 3 hrs. An examination of the aims, 
objectives, and role of laboratory programs in driver education. 

443. Methods of Driver and Traffic Safety Education. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: HSE 440. 
Methods and techniques to develop competence in transferring knowledge and skills. 

444. Simulation in Driver Education. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: HSE 440 and HSE 443. 
An audiovisual instructional method designed to complement and supplement other in- 
structional techniques. 

445. Driver Education Laboratory. 1 hr. This course is designed to provide students 
who are enrolled in HSE 443 with supervised teaching experience. 

446. Innovative Programs of Driver Education. 3 hrs. New and unique teaching 
methods of driver and traffic safety education. 

488. Motorcycle Education. 3 hrs. Analysis of the motorcycle traffic problem; 
methods of teaching classroom and laboratory phases of motorcycle education. 

489. Driver Education for Special Students. 3 hrs. Curriculum development and 
teaching materials in traffic safety education for special education students. 

492. Special Problems. 3 hrs. A student originated problem, research plan, and 
reporting of results, with guidance of a chosen adviser. 



292/Course Descriptions 



HISTORY (HIS— 272) 



ECO 310 and PS 420, 421, and 425 may be selected as history if approved by the stu- 
dent's adviser. No more than six (6) hours of these courses may be counted as history 
credit. 

101. World Civilization to 1648 A.D. 3 hrs. (JC 11 13 or 1 143) 

102. World Civilization Since 1648 A.D. 3 hrs. (JC 1 123 or 1 153) 

140. United States to 1877. 3 hrs. (JC 2213 or 2243) 

141. United States Since 1877. 3 hrs. (JC 2223 or 2253) 

300. World History Since 1945. 3 hrs. An analysis of Communist ideology and the 
power relationships between the United States, Russia, and China since 1945. 

301. Modern China and Japan. 3 hrs. An historical study of China and Japan in the 
19th and 20th centuries. 

303. Studies in Non-Western History. 3 hrs. May be repeated for a total of nine 
hours. 

310. The Ancient World. 3 hrs. 

311. The Middle Ages. 3 hrs. 
313. Early English History. 3 hrs. 

315. Studies in European History. 3 hrs. May be repeated for a total of nine hours. 

340. Afro-American History. 3 hrs. A chronologically arranged survey of the black 
political, social, economic, and intellectual experience in slavery and freedom, with em- 
phasis on protest thought and deed. 

341. Mississippi History. 3 hrs. A survey of Mississippi's economic, social, and 
political development from seventeenth century European settlement to the present. 

342. U.S. Military History. 3 hrs. A survey of American military history. 

343. Our Times. 3 hrs. A detailed examination of social, intellectual, political, 
diplomatic, and economic history since World War II. 

344. Studies in United States History. 3 hrs. May be repeated for a total of nine 
hours. 

345. Introduction to Historical Methodology. 3 hrs. A basic course to acquaint the 
student with the theory and practice of historical study. 

380. Latin American Empires. 3 hrs. A description and analysis of Maya, Aztec, In- 
ca, Spanish, and other European empires which have helped shape Latin America's tradi- 
tions. 

381. Modern Latin America. 3 hrs. A study of Latin American history from in- 
dependence (ca. 1825) to the present with an emphasis on social, economic, and cultural 
developments. 

382. Studies in Latin American History. An undergraduate seminar dealing with a 
variety of Latin American topics. May be repeated for a total of nine hours. 

411. History of the USSR. 3 hrs. 

412. English Constitutional and Legal History. 3 hrs. Emphasis on the main trends 
in the evolution of the modern common law system and the contemporary constitution. 

413. Medieval Life and Thought. 3 hrs. 

414. Modern Germany. 3 hrs. A survey of the political, diplomatic, economic, and 
social developments in Germany from the Bismarchian era through the Third Reich. 

415. French Revolution and Napoleon. 3 hrs. A study of Revolutionary and 
Napolenic France and its impact on Europe. 






History/293 

416. Europe 1815-1870. 3 hrs. A survey of early nineteenth century Europe, with em- 
phasis on nationalism and the quest for reform. 

417. Europe 1870-1914. 3 hrs. A survey of the late nineteenth and early twentieth 
century Europe with emphasis on the growth of democrary, the expansion of empires, and 
the origin of World War I. 

418. Europe, 1914-1945. 3 hrs. 
421. Tudor-Stuart Britain. 3 hrs. 

424. Modern European Popular Culture. 3 hrs. 

425. Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Britain. 3 hrs. 

440. The Age of Jefferson and Jackson. 3 hrs. A study of political, social, and 
cultural changes in the United States from 1789-1848. 

442. The Old South. 3 hrs. The social, economic, and cultural history of the 
antebellum South with particular emphasis on the plantation system and slavery. 

443. The New South. 3 hrs. An analysis of the pecularities of the South's social, 
economic, political, and intellectual development from 1877 to the present. Emphasis is 
placed on those factors making the South distinctive in American history. 

445. U. S. Foreign Relations to 1914. 3 hrs. A study of U. S. foreign policy from the 
American revolution to World War I with an emphasis on manifest destiny and American 
expansion. 

446. U. S. Foreign Relations Since 1914. 3 hrs. A continuation of HIS 445 with an 
emphasis of the diplomacy of World War I, the events leading to World War II, World 
War II, and the Cold War. 

447. Colonial America. 3 hrs. Development of social, political, economic, and 
religious life in the English colonies of North America to 1763. 

448. The American Revolution. 3 hrs. A discussion course concerning the dispute 
between Great Britain and her American colonies which led to the development of a new 
nation. 

450. The Early American Frontier. 3 hrs. A discussion course concerning pioneer 
life— primarily in the South — from the Atlantic seaboard to the Mississippi Valley. 

451. The Western Frontier. 3 hrs. Examines the significance of frontier types west of 
the Mississippi including explorers, mountain men, cowboys, farmers, miners, railroaders, 
and Indians. 

452. The Sectional Controversy and the Civil War, 1848-1877. 3 hrs. An examination 
of sectional conflict, Civil War, and Reconstruction with primary emphasis on political and 
military history. 

453. Modern America. 3 hrs. A survey of political, economic, diplomatic, and social 
developments in the United States from the close of the Civil War through the end of World 
War I. 

454. Twentieth Century America, 1919-1945. 3 hrs. A detailed examination of the 
social, intellectual, political, diplomatic, and economic history of the interwar years. 

456. U. S. Legal and Constitutional History to 1877. 3 hrs. Examines the relation- 
ship between law and society in formative period of American history. 

457. U. S. Legal and Constitutional History Since 1877. 3 hrs. Traces the response of 
law to problems of modernization in the United States from the end of Reconstruction to 
the present. 

475. A History of American Thought I. 3 hrs. A survey of American thought from 
the 17th through the 19th century. 

476. A History of American Thought II. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: HIS 471 or permission 
of instructor. A survey of 20th century American thought. 



294/Course Descriptions 

480. History of Mexico and the Carribean. 3 hrs. 

481. History of South America: The Andean Countries. 3 hrs. 

482. History of South America: Brazil and the Rio de la Plata. 3 hrs. 
492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION (HEE— 820) 

301. Teaching Home Economics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Junior standing in home 
economics. A study of teaching techniques, materials and school procedures, as well as 
planning and organizing curriculum. 

302. Consumer Economics. 3 hrs. A study of the consumer in occupational pro- 
grams for youth and adult audiences. 

402. Occupational Home Economics. 4 hrs. Participation in occupational programs 
for youth and adult audiences. 

403. Student Teaching Home Economics. 9 hrs. Prerequisite: HEE 301 with grade 
no lower than B. 

478. Home Economics Seminar. 1 hr. This course is concerned with the history and 
philosophy of home economics and the preparation of the professional home economics 
graduate. 

492. Special Problems. 1-4 hrs. arr. 

HONORS COLLEGE (HON— 000) 

111. Honors Colloquium. 3 hrs. Major civilizations of the western world. 

112. Honors Colloquium. 3 hrs. Continuation of HON 1 1 1 . 

121. Honors Composition. 1 hr. An introduction to writing non-fiction prose. 

122. Honors Composition. 1 hr. Continuation of HON 121. 
131. Honors Art. 3 hrs. Art in western civilization. 

211. Honors Colloquium. 3 hrs. Continuation of HON 1 12. 

212. Honors Colloquium. 3 hrs. Continuation of HON 21 1 . 

221. Honors Composition. 1 hr. Continuation of HON 122. 

222. Honors Composition. 3 hrs. Continuation of HON 221. 
231. Honors Music. 3 hrs. Music in western civilization. 

241. Studies in Contemporary Science. 3 hrs. Theoretical, laboratory, and field 
study of current scientific problems. 

242. Studies in Contemporary Science. 3 hrs. Continuation of HON 241. 

301. Prospectus Writing. 1 hr. Introductory research methods for Honors students. 

302. Honors Colloquium. 1 hr. Various topics of contemporary concern. 

303. Honors Colloquium. 3 hrs. Continuation of HON 212. 

311. Honors Directed Study. 3 hrs. Independent study for Honors students. 

312. Honors Directed Study. 3 hrs. Continuation of HON 31 1. 

321. University Forum. 1 hr. A presentation of major themes in humanities, science, 
and social science. 

322. University Forum. 1 hr. Continuation of HON 321 . 

401. Honors Colloquium. 1 hr. Various topics of contemporary concern. 

402. Honors Colloquium. 1 hr. Continuation of HON 401 . 



Housing/295 

403. Honors Colloquium. 3 hrs. Aspects of civilization. 

411. Honors Directed Study. 3 hrs. Independent study for Honors students. 

490. Honors Colloquium. 3 hrs. The contemporary world. 

492. Honors Research. 1-3 hrs. Senior project. 

Special Honors sections are also offered by several departments, as follows: BIO 
H101,BIOH102,PSH101,SOCH101. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT ADMINISTRATION (HRA— 818) 

179. Introduction to Lodging and Food Service Management. 3 hrs. An introductory 
course in the lodging, food service and tourism industries. 

475. Food and Beverage Management. 3 hrs. Basic principles and procedures of ef- 
fective beverage selection, control, and management. 

476. Hotel and Motel Administration. 3 hrs. Organization, management, and 
operating procedures of lodging facilities. 

478. Seminar in Hotel and Restaurant Industry. 1-6 hrs. arr. Discussion and analysis 
of principles, trends, and practices in the industry. 

479. Internship in Lodging and Food Service. 9 hrs. arr. Structured and supervised 
on-the-job learning experience in lodging and/or food service. 

480. Hospitality Industry Accounting. 3 hrs. Accounting principles applied to the 
hospitality industry. Financial statement analysis through case study. Managerial accoun- 
ting emphasized. 

481. Laws and Regulations of the Travel Industry. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Junior 
status, MGT 370. Origin, development, and principles of common and statutory law as 
they apply to the travel industry. 

482. Marketing of Hospitality and Travel Services. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MKT 355. 
Analysis of the planning, developing, and marketing of food, lodging, and travel services. 

483. Dimensions of Tourism. 3 hrs. Study of the components and forces which in- 
fluence the international and domestic hospitality and travel industries. 

492. Special Problems in Hotel and Restaurant Administration. 1-6 hrs. 

HOUSING AND HOME MANAGEMENT (HHM— 825) 

339. Shelter Components. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CT 330. A study of materials of ar- 
chitectural interiors and furnishings. 

340. Housing and House Furnishing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CT 332. A study of the 
economic and sociological problems in housing and house furnishing. 

341. Historic Furniture and Interior Design I. 3 hrs. A study of the patterns of 
historical development and change as revealed in furniture and domestic interiors from the 
Renaissance through twentieth century, excluding America. 

342. Historic Furniture and Interior Design II. 3 hrs. American furniture styles and 
interior design. 

343. Budget Decorating. 3 hrs. A problems course related to decorating with limited 
resources. 

345. Household Equipment. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FN 261. A study of the selection, 
operation, care, repair, and arrangement of appliances in the home. 

401. Demonstration Techniques. 3 hrs. Planning and conducting demonstrations for 
professional home economists. 

441. Field Work in Equipment. 9 hrs. Field work for those planning to become home 
economists in business. 



296/Course Descriptions 

442. Economics of the Home. 3 hrs. Problems of homemaking relating to wise use of 
resources. 

443. Home Management Residence. 4 hrs. Prerequisites: FN 163, 261, 362 and 
HHM 345. (HHM 442 to be taken concurrently.) 

492. Special Problems in Housing and Home Management. 1-4 hrs. A. Housing — 
Prerequisite: HHM 340. B. Equipment— Prerequisite: HHM 345. 



HUMANITIES (HUM— 001) 

210. Man's Precarious Habitat. 3 hrs. A study of physical, biological, social, 
political, and economic problems of environment. 

310. Greek Culture and Literature in Translation. 3 hrs. A survey of Greek culture 
and civilization from Homer to Plato. 

313. Latin Culture and Literature in Translation. 3 hrs. A survey of Latin Culture 
and civilization. 

314. History of Music. 3 hrs. An investigation of major developments in music from 
classical Greece to the modern age. 

315. History of Art. 3 hrs. An investigation of the visual arts in the history of 
western man. 

316. The Impact of Science on History. 3 hrs. An investigation of the historical im- 
portance of science. 

380. History of Philosophy. 3 hrs. An historically oriented introduction to major 
philosophical ideas. 

382. Introduction to Anthropology. 3 hrs. A comprehensive and indepth introduc- 
tion to each of the major fields of anthropology. 

410. Readings in Western Literature I. 3 hrs. Selected translations of masterpieces of 
world literature to 1500. 

412. Readings in Western Literature II. 3 hrs. An analysis of selected European 
literature from 1500 to the present. 

INDUSTRIAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (IVE— 165) 

116. Multifield Crafts Laboratory. 3 hrs. An introduction to contemporary art- 
crafts with laboratory experience and skill development. A multiple activity emphasis. 

301. Applied Electricity. 3 hrs. Introduction to electrical theory. Laboratory ex- 
perience with basic communications and industrial circuits. 

302. Applied Electronics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: IVE 301. A continuation of electron 
theory and laboratory experience with communications and industrial circuits. 

303. Industrial Electronics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: IVE 302. Solid state integrated cir- 
cuits. Printed circuit board fabrication and trouble-shooting. 

314. Leather Craft. 3 hrs. Designing, tooling, carving, and finishing leather products. 

315. Plastics. 3 hrs. Materials in common use, project design, and fabrication. 

316. Power Mechanics. 3 hrs. Development and use of all forms of power. 
Laboratory experiences with gasoline engines. 

318. Materials and Processes of Industry. 3 hrs. A study of manufacturing methods 
with a wide variety of industrial materials. 

319. Industrial Arts for Elementary Teachers. 3 hrs. A methods course for elemen- 
tary teachers. 



323. Engineering Drawing I. 3 hrs. 









Industrial and Vocational Education/297 

324. Engineering Drawing II. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: IVE323. 

331. Woodwork. 3 hrs. Introduction to woodworking tools; materials, processes, 
and products. 

332. Finishing Materials and Applications. 3 hrs. A course covering equipment, 
materials, and techniques. 

333. Advanced Woodwork. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: IVE 331. Emphasis upon design, 
machine use, and advanced project construction. 

350. Architectural Drawing. 3 hrs. Practice in drafting contemporary house plans: 
Floor plans, elevations, sections, details, etc. 

360. General Metals. 3 hrs. Introduction to the field of metal working. 

361 . Sheet Metal Fabrication. 3 hrs. Pattern making and metal forming processes. 

362. Machining Processes. 3 hrs. Typical machine operations including turning, 
drilling, milling, etc. 

364. Welding. 3 hrs. Theory and practice in gas and arc welding. 

365. Casting Technology. 3 hrs. Investigations and laboratory experiences in casting 
processes. 

366. Decorative Metal Work. 3 hrs. Designing, constructing, and finishing of 
decorative objects in metal. 

400. Shop Planning and Equipment Selection. 3 hrs. A study of shop layout, equip- 
ment specifications, cost, and procurement. 

401. Laboratory Organization and Management. 3 hrs. Organization of students and 
physical facilities. 

402. History and Philosophy of Industrial Education. 3 hrs. A study of the underly- 
ing foundations and principles, leaders, and movements in industrial arts. 

403. Occupational Analysis and Course Construction. 3 hrs. Analyzing occupations 
into their basic components and arranging for instructional purposes. 

404. Problems of the Coordinator. 3 hrs. A study of the problems, procedures, 
techniques, etc., in the operation of part-time cooperative education. 

420. Industrial Materials Testing. 3 hrs. A systematic study of common industrial 
materials, their properties, and application through experiments and research. 

421. Power Transmissions. 3 hrs. A study of mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, and 
electrical power amplification and transmission. 

430. Introduction to Vocational and Technical Education. 3 hrs. 

431. Principles of Trade and Industrial Teaching. 3 hrs. A methods course for 
teaching trade and industrial subjects. 

432. Problems of Adult Education. 3 hrs. Methods and techniques in teaching adults 
in industrial education classes. 

433. Curriculum Construction for Cooperative and Adult Vocational Classes. 3 hrs. 
Objectives, content, arrangement and techniques of teaching in part-time cooperative and 
evening programs. 

434. Occupational Surveys. 3 hrs. Planning and conducting occupational surveys for 
educational purposes. 

435. Instructional Materials for Industrial Education. 3 hrs. Indentification, selec- 
tion, development, and use of instructional aids in vocational and technical education. 

436. Curriculum Construction for Vocational Technical Education. 3 hrs. Principles, 
practices, and techniques in planning and establishing a class or program in vocational 
technical education. 



298/Course Descriptions 

462. Advanced Machine Tool Techniques. 3 hrs. Advanced study of machine tool 
operations processes and procedures. 

480. History and Philosophy of Vocational Education. 3 hrs. Objectives, principles, 
aims, and organization of programs in schools and colleges. 

481. Testing and Evaluation in Vocational Education. 3 hrs. Development and 
utilization of various measuring devices and techniques. 

482. Industrial and Vocational Safety. 3 hrs. Analysis of fundamentals of accident 
prevention and their application in school and industrial shops. 

483. Occupational Safety. 3 hrs. Organization and administration of safety pro- 
grams including implementation of the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Primarily for 
industrial educators. 

492. Industrial Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisites: Senior standing and chair- 
man's permission. 

494. Student Teaching in Vocational-Technical Education. 9 hrs. Prerequisite: IVE 
431. For students who plan to teach in a post-secondary vocational or technical program 
and who are not presently employed in such a program. 

495. Internship in Vocational-Technical Education. 1-9 hrs. Prerequisite: IVE 431. 
A nine-months' supervised experience for practicing teachers of vocational or technical 
subjects. 

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY (INT— 395) 

148. Engineering Graphics. 3 hrs. The basics of engineering drawing: tools and 
equipment, sketching, projections, dimensioning, and tolerances. 

249. Production Graphics. 3 hrs. Graphical procedures used in industrial processes 
and product development. 

250. Descriptive Geometry. 3 hrs. Orthographic projection as applied to representa- 
tion and solution of engineering problems. 

300. Manufacturing Processes. 3 hrs. Elementary manufacturing operations and 
their combination into manufacturing processes. 

301. Engineering Economics. 3 hrs. Mathematical techniques used to simplify 
economic comparisons in the acquisition and retirement of capital goods in industry. 

306. Electrical Power System Instrumentation. 3 hrs. Instrumentation and techni- 
ques for monitoring electrical power system operation. 

308. Industrial Instrumentation. 3 hrs. Modern methods of measurement and con- 
trol of process variables; temperature, pressure, liquid level, flow, etc. 

392. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. arr. Prerequisite: Junior standing; approval of 
faculty adviser. Individual or group study in area not covered by available courses. 

400. Senior Project. 3 hrs. arr. Prerequisite: Senior standing; approval of faculty 
adviser. Student required to complete project in his area of specialization. 

401. Senior Project. 3 hrs. arr. Continuation of INT 400. 

405. Production Technology. 3 hrs. Plant layout, materials handling, production 
evaluation, set-up and maintenance procedures. 

406. Industrial Automation. 3 hrs. Automation and its productive, economic, in- 
terpersonal, and supervisory aspects. 

407. Personnel in Technology. 3 hrs. Concepts, principles, techniques, and programs 
essential to the employment, development, and utilization of technical personnel. 

408. Innovations in Technology. 3 hrs. Introduction to factors involved in 
technological change within an industrial operation. 



Institution Administration/299 

409. Plant Layout. 3 hrs. Effectiveness of plant layout to the production activity, in- 
volving personnel, materials, tools and equipment. 

440. Alternate Energy Systems. 3 hrs. Study of alternative sources of energy and 
power. 

443. Power Plants. 3 hrs. Study of stationary power plants, economics, efficiency, 
components, fuels, and typical industrial applications. 

461. Electrical Power Generation and Distribution. 4 hrs. Power generation and 
distribution, load flow, faults, grids, and layout. 

462. Power System Economics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: INT 461. Economics of power 
system operation: cost analysis, rate determination, optimum system operation. 

463. Computer Methods in Electrical Power. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: INT 461. 
Computer-aided analysis and design of electric power systems. 

476. Electrical Safety in Industry. 3 hrs. Electrical equipment safety. Injuries caused 
by electrical faults. Inspection and maintenance of electrical equipment. 

477. Fire Safety in Industry. 3 hrs. Factors contributing to industrial fires. Chemistry 
and classifications of fires. Fire extinguishers and water systems. Fire Prevention. 

491. Seminar. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: INT 461 and senior standing. Tours, guest lec- 
tures, student presentations, and discussions of the latest methods in the field. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Senior standing; approval of faculty 
adviser. Supervised study in area not covered by available courses. 



INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION (IAD— 817) 

271. Problems in Managing a Food Service. 3 hrs. Organizational structure of the 
federal school lunch program. Emphasis placed on management procedures. 

272. Basic Principles of Quanitity Food Service. 3 hrs. Emphasis on planning, 
preparation and service for large groups. 

273. Sanitation for Institutions. 3 hrs. Emphasis on all phases of sanitation. 

370. Catering. 2 hrs. Principles, techniques and implementation of special functions 
in food service. 

470. The School Lunch. 3 hrs. Designed to give experience in menu planning, 
records, food buying and preparing and serving food on quantity level. 

471. Institution Food Purchasing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Investiga- 
tion of marketing conditions, sources, standards, grades, methods, and storage of classes 
of foods. 

472. Quantity Food Production and Service. 4 hrs. Emphasis on actual food 
preparation and serving on quantity level. 

473. Food Systems Management. 6 hrs. Food preparation, organization, financial 
control and personnel management for institution food departments. 

474. Layout and Equipment. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Junior standing. A study of the 
layout and function of physical facilities with emphasis on arrangement, selection, cost, 
and care of equipment. 

475. Food Systems II. 6 hrs. Organization and management cost control. Layout and 
equipment and human relations. 

476. Food Service Management. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: IAD 472. A study of manage- 
ment of food service systems and the interrelationship of the components of these systems. 

492. Special Problems in Institution Administration. 1-4 hrs. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 



300/Course Descriptions 

JOURNALISM (JOU— 212) 

102. Beginning Reporting. 3 hrs. (JC 1 1 13) 

103. Intermediate Reporting. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 102. Application of news 
gathering and writing techniques with emphasis on interviews, speeches and press con- 
ferences. 

140. Elements of Photography. 3 hrs. 

140-L Elements of Photography Laboratory. 1 hr. 

240. Visual Journalism. 3 hrs. Study and use of the elements of design as used in the 
photographic image. 

300. Journalism Laboratory. 1 hr. (May be repeated twice.) 

301 . Feature Writing. 3 hrs. Writing and marketing magazine articles. 

311. Editing. 3 hrs. 

312. Design Typography. 3 hrs. General survey of type and printing development. 
Practical exercises in preparation of camera-ready copy through production. 

313. Newspaper Design and Make-up. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 311. 
315. Editorial Writing. 3 hrs. 

331. Print Media Advertising. 3 hrs. Study and practical assignments in copy writing 
and designing advertising layouts. 

341. Intermediate Photography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 140. Photographic techni- 
ques and composition for 35 mm and 120 format photography. 

342. History of Still Photography. 3 hrs. 

344. Photojournalism. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 341. 

346. Color Photography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 341 . Color photography and 
printing techniques using both positive and negative color film. 

402. Advanced Reporting. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 103. Public affairs reporting 
emphasizing coverage of city and county governments and the courts. 

403. Specialized Reporting. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 103. Emphasis on methods of 
indepth research and news gathering with writing designed for specific publications. 

405. Problems in Newspaper Production. 3 hrs. Practical training in the production 
of student newspaper and advising of staffs. 

418. Practicum in Journalism. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 103 for practicum in 
newseditorial program; JOU 140 for practicum in photojournalism; JOU 331 for prac- 
ticum in advertising. 

421. Public Relations. 3 hrs. 

422. Publicity Methods. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 102. 
425. Business and Professional Publications. 3 hrs. 

428. Public and Press Relations Management. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 421. 

440. Advanced Press Photography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 341. 

442. Commercial Print Media Photography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 341. 

444. Advanced Commercial Photography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 442. Techniques 
emphasizing professional quality work in the specialized areas of commercial photography. 

450. History of Journalism. 3 hrs. 

452. Press and Society. 3 hrs. Study of the relationship between ihe press and the 
culture and institutions of society. 

460. Law of Ihe Press. 3 hrs. 



Management/301 

470. Newspaper Organization and Management. 3 hrs. 
492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE (LS— 170) 

101 . Introduction to the Library. 1 hr. Basic course in keys to information resources. 
May not be used for a major in library science. 

201. Introduction to Library Resources and Usage. 3 hrs. A survey of library 
resources as well as methods and techniques for effective utilization of library materials and 
services. May not be used for a major in library science. 

401. Introduction to Reference Resources and Services. 3 hrs. An introduction to 
reference materials, services, activities, and functions as well as methods for locating in- 
formation. 

405. Cataloging and Classification I. 3 hrs. Principles and methods of cataloging and 
classifying library materials. Provides practice in bibliographical description and subject 
analysis. 

406. Cataloging and Classification II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: LS 405. Advanced study 
of the principles and methods of descriptive and subject cataloging and classification with 
attention to non-print materials. 

408. Administration of Library-Media Centers I. 3 hrs. A survey of the objectives, 
functions, and organization of the library-media center in elementary and secondary 
schools. 

409. Administration of Library-Media Centers II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: LS 408. Ad- 
vanced study of school library media programs with emphasis on the application of ad- 
ministrative principles to planning, budgeting, staffing, and evaluation. 

41 1. Development of Multi-Media Collections. 3 hrs. Principles governing the selec- 
tions and procurement of all types of library materials, including the use of selection aids 
and bibliographic sources. 

416. Audiovisual Media and Equipment. 3 hrs. A survey of media resources and 
equipment with an emphasis on utilization in libraries. Provides experience with equip- 
ment. 

417. Literature and Related Media for Children. 3 hrs. A survey of children's 
literature, traditional and modern, and other related materials for use by and with children 
of grades 1-6. 

418. Literature and Related Media for Adolescents. 3 hrs. Study of adolescent 
literature and other related materials for use by and with young people of grades 7-12. 

425. Instructional Styles in Media Centers. 3 hrs. The assessment of individualized 
styles of instruction in school library media centers. 

426. Film and Television in Libraries. 3 hrs. The conceptualization, production, 
critiquing, and effective utilization of film and video in planning library services and 
related activities. 

489. Library Practicum. 1-4 hrs. arr. Supervised work in a library to provide the stu- 
dent with operational library experience. 

491. School Library-Media Administration Workshop. 3 hrs. Intensive two-week 
workshop on problems of media center administration. May be taken twice. 

492. Special Problems in Librarianship. 1-3 hrs. Individual investigation of topics to 
be approved by the dean. 

MANAGEMENT (MCT— 620) 

360. Fundamentals of Management. 3 hrs. Introduction to planning, organizing, 
staffing, directing, and controlling production processes and human behavior in organiza- 
tions, including the social, legal, and economic environments. 



302/Course Descriptions 

364. Personnel Management. 3 hrs. Emphasis on procuring, developing, maintain- 
ing, and utilizing an effective work force, within the current legal and social environment. 

386. Safety Management. 3 hrs. A study of occupational accident prevention and 
current legislation regarding occupational health and safety. 

454. Human Relations. 3 hrs. A study of individual and group interaction and 
behavior in organizations, including motivation, leadership and communication. 

455. Behavioral Issues in Organizations. 3 hrs. An experiential study of organiza- 
tional behavior with emphasis on development of leadership, communication, and motiva- 
tional skills. 

464. Work Methods and Performance Standards. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ECO 301 . 
Fundamentals of time study, job standards, and work methods improvement. 

465. Production and Operations Management. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ECO 301. 
Development of the I.M. functions of production planning and control, inventory control, 
quality control, and materials handling. 

467. Quantitative Methods in Management. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 312. Develop- 
ment of the quantitative methods and techniques used in I.M. 

468. Compensation Administration. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MGT 360. Wage and salary 
administration including job analysis, incentive systems, wage survey, and fringe benefits. 

472. Labor Relations. 3 hrs. An integrated study of current law, practice, and policy; 
cases and role playing. 

476. Managerial Systems Analysis. 3 hrs. Management systems and procedures for 
improving managerial controls and reducing operating costs. 

482. Production Problems Seminar. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Background in industrial 
management. A case approach to such areas as selection and maintenance of equipment, 
product mix and quality, and production controls. 

484. Problems in Personnel Administration. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Background in per- 
sonnel management. Case analysis, incidents, and role playing. 

485. Administrative Policy and Decision Making. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Completion 
of business core. A study of policies dealing with production, marketing, finance, and per- 
sonnel. Case problems and a computer game are utilized. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of chair- 
man. Directed research on approved topic of interest to the student. 

496. Small Business Counsulting. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Completion of business core 
and consent of instructor. Actual problem solving in business. 



MARKETING (MKT— 625) 

300. Principles of Marketing. 3 hrs. An integrated managerial-systems approach to 
the study of the marketing function in organizations. Development of marketing concepts, 
institutions, functions, and policies are analyzed within the framework of the competitive, 
legal, economic, and social environment. 

322. Creative Marketing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MKT 300. An introductory course in 
problem-solving techniques which emphasizes creative problem-solving methodology, in- 
formation processing strategies, and interpersonal behavior in task-oriented groups applied 
to marketing. 

330. Professional Selling. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MKT 300. An analysis of the ethics, 
functions, and techniques of professional selling using a behavioral and managerial ap- 
proach. 

342. Principles of Retailing. 3 hrs. The operation of retail stores including location, 
display, merchandise planning and control. 



Marriage and Family Life/303 

355. Principles of Advertising. 3 hrs. An introduction to the field of advertising in- 
cluding the background and social impact of today's advertising, media selection, 
copywriting, layout, visualization, and typography. 

365. Consumer Behavior. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MKT 300. Analysis of human 
behavior in the market place. Emphasis is placed on applying concepts from the social 
sciences to understanding consumer decision processes, buying patterns, and consumer 
research. 

380. Industrial Marketing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MKT 300. Special problems involved 
in marketing materials, equipment, and supplies to manufacturers, and other business 
firms. 

424. Marketing Research. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MKT 300 and ECO 302. A study of 
the systems, methods, and procedures used in meeting the informational needs of managers 
in the marketing area for both quantitative and qualitative marketing data. 

428. Marketing Management. 3 hrs. A comprehensive course designed to synthesize 
the more specialized marketing knowledge of the student, through the study of case 
histories. 

430. Sales Management. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MKT 300 and MKT 330. A study of 
the methods and procedures involved in selection, training, organization, compensation, 
supervision, and evaluation of the sales force, using the modified case method of instruc- 
tion. 

442. Advanced Retailing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MKT 300 and MKT 342. An examina- 
tion of specific problem areas in retail innovations, spatial competition, and retail mix 
development. 

455. Advanced Advertising. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MKT 355. An application of the 
principles of advertising including areas in trademarks, packaging, research, campaigns, 
and direct advertising. 

458. Promotion Management. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MKT 355 or consent of instruc- 
tor. A practical application and integration of the basic principles from the areas of adver- 
tising, personal selling, sales promotion, public relations, and publicity. A modified case 
approach is used in the course. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 

495. International Marketing. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MKT 300 and MGT 360. The 
economic, political, and cultural aspects of international business operations. 



MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIFE (MFL— 830) 

150. Social Competencies. 2 hrs. A course designed to help the student develop com- 
petencies in social interation. (JC 1111 or 1121) 

151. Personal Development and Interpersonal Relationships. 3 hrs. Identifying stu- 
dent interests and problems arising out of the college life. 

351. Marriage and Family Living. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. A 
course designed to give better understanding of the factors that contribute to success and 
happiness in marriage. 

451. Seminar in Marriage Adjustments. 3 hrs. Broad areas of marriage adjustment 
with emphasis on needs and interests of the group. 

452. Parenthood. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MFL 351 or permission of instructor. 
Preparation for parenthood. Family planning, role analysis, and family interaction. 

490. Field Work in Family Living. 9 hrs. Designed to provide supervised experiences 
in a career oriented area. 

492. Special Problem in Marriage and Family Living. 1-4 hrs. Prerequisites: MFL 
351 and consent of instructor. 



304/Course Descriptions 



MATHEMATICS (MAT— 350) 



101. College Algebra. 3 hrs. Polynomials, factoring, functions and graphs, linear 
and quadratic equations and inequalities. (JC 1313) 

103. Plane Trigonometry. 3 hrs. Trigonometric functions and their inverses, 
trigonometric identities and equations, solutions of triangles, logarithms. (JC 1323) 

111. Mathematical Calculations. 1 hr. Use of mini-calculators to obtain numerical 
results through the application of a variety of basic mathematical formulas. 

112. Applied Algebra for Problem Solving. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 101 . Sets, rela- 
tions, functions, graphs, logarithms, sequences, interest, equations, matrices, inequalities, 
linear programming. (JC 1433) 

120. Mathematics for the Arts and Humanities. 3 hrs. Basic mathematical concepts 
from logic, algebra, probability, statistics, computers, and modern applications. 

The above courses are open only to freshmen. Other students desiring to take these 
courses must have approval from the chairman of the Mathematics Department. 

131. Algebra for Technology. 3 hrs. Basic college algebra with applications to 
modern technology. 

133. Trigonometry for Technology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 131. Basic concepts 
from trigonometry with specific applications to modern technology. 

199. Developmental Mathematics. 3 hrs. Fundamental operations with integers, ra- 
tional numbers, and real numbers; set language, elementary algebra. (Will not satisfy core 
requirement.) 

210. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Acceptable score 
on the Mathematics Placement Test or CIE 100. The real number system and its major sub- 
systems: natural numbers, integers, rational numbers. (Open only to elementary and special 
education majors.) (JC 1723) 

236. Introduction to Calculus in Technology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 133. Plane 
analytic geometry, differentiation and integration with applications to curvilinear motion, 
related rates, curve sketching and areas. 

237. Applications of Calculus in Technology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 236. Con- 
tinuations of techniques of differentiation and integration. Areas, volumes, centroids, 
moments of inertia, and an introduction to first and second order differential equations. 

276. Calculus I with Analytic Geometry. 3 hrs. Corequisite: MAT 103. Functions, 
limits, derivatives, application of the derivative, and selected topics from analytic 
geometry. (JC 1523, 1623, 1815, or 1823) 

277. Calculus II with Analytic Geometry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 276 or MAT 

278. Definite and indefinite integrals, applications of the integral, transcendental func- 
tions, and selected topics from analytic geometry. (JC 1825, 1833, or 2223) 

278. Differential and Integral Calculus with Analytic Geometry I. 5 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: MAT 103. Functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, definite and indefinite 
integrals with applications, and selected topics from analytic geometry. 

310. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 210. Basic 
concepts of algebra and informal geometry. (Open only to elementary and special educa- 
tion majors.) 

312. Applied Mathematics for Business Decision Making. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 
112. Elementary functions, differential and integral calculus with applications. (A student 
who receives credit for any other calculus course cannot use this course to satisfy any degree 
requirements.) 

314. Applied Mathematics for the Life Sciences. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 103. An 
introduction to functions, graphs, sequences, series, continuity, differential and integral 
calculus, with applications to the life sciences. 



Mathematics/305 

320. Introductory Probability and Mathematical Statistics. 3 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: MAT 276 or permission of instructor. Fundamental principles and techniques in pro- 
bability and mathematical statistics. 

326. Linear Algebra I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 276. Vector spaces, systems of 
linear equations, linear transformations, matrices, inner products. 

341. Foundations of Mathematics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Logic, 
set theory, relations, functions, cardinal numbers. 

370. Introductory Geometry. 3 hrs. Introduction to elementary Euclidean geometry 
and formulas related to two and three-dimensional space. 

377. Differential and Integral Calculus with Analytic Geometry II. 4 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: MAT 277 or MAT 278. Transcendental functions, techniques of integration, infinite 
series, L'Hospital's rule, improper integrals, Taylor's formula, and selected topics from 
analytic geometry. 

378. Calculus III with Analytic Geometry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 277 or MAT 
377. Techniques of integration, infinite series, ('Hospital's rule, improper integrals, 
Taylor's formula, and selected topics from analytical geometry. 

379. Multivariable Calculus. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 377 or MAT 378. Differen- 
tial calculus of several variables, directional derivatives, partial derivatives, the chain rule, 
extrema problems, double and triple integrals and their applications. 

385. Introduction to Differential Equations I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 378. Linear 
ordinary differential equations with applications; an introduction to power series solutions. 

410. Mathematics for Teachers of Junior High School Mathematics. 3 hrs. Numbers 
and infinite sets, geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, coordinate geometry, trigonometry, 
functions, probability, statistics. (Open only to elementary and special education majors or 
as an elective for mathematics majors.) 

411. Vector Analysis. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 379. Vector valued functions, space 
curves, line and surface integration, the divergence theorem, Green's and Stokes theorems. 

415. Introduction to Differential Equations II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 385. 
Systems of linear differential equations, operator methods, approximating solutions, 
LaPIace transforms. 

417. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 385. 
Intergrability conditions, quasilinear equations, applications of physics, classification of 
second order equations and canonical forms, separation of variables. 

418. Linear Programming. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 326. Convex sets, linear ine- 
qualities, extreme-point solutions, complex procedure, applications. 

419. Optimization in Mathematical Programming. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 326 
and MAT 379. Selected topics in optimization from linear and nonlinear programming. 

420. Statistics and Probability. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 341 and MAT 379. Ran- 
dom variables, probability functions, independent events, conditional probability, expecta- 
tion, hypothesis testing. 

421. Number Theory. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 341. Induction, well-ordering, divi- 
sion algorithm, Euclidean algorithm, Fundamental Theorem of arithmetic, number 
theoretic functions, congruences. 

423. Modern Algebra I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 341 . Survey of standard algebraic 
systems: rings, integral domains, fields, modules, polynomial rings, fields of quotients. 

424. Modern Algebra II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 423. Elementary notions in 
groups, Fundamental Theorem of Finitely Generated Groups, permutation groups, quo- 
tient groups, the isomorphism theorems, applications of transformation groups. 

425. Fourier Series. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 326 and MAT 385. Orthogonal func- 
tions, Fourier series, convergence and applications. 



306/Course Descriptions 

426. Linear Algebra II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 326. Determinants, polynomals 
complex numbers, single linear transformations, orthogonal, unitary and symmetric linear 
transformations. 

430. Introduction to Applied Mathematics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 326, MAT 
385, CSS 240. Applications of ordinary and partial differential equations to dynamical and 
electrical systems, heat transfer and diffusion problems. 

435. Laplace Transform. 3 hrs. Corequisite: MAT 385. Transforms, inverse 
transforms, convolution theorem, differentiation and integration of transforms, applica- 
tions to differential equations. 

436. Theory of Functions of Complex Variable I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 379. 
Complex numbers and functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, analytic function, 
branches, contour integration, series. 

437. Graph Theory. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 341. An introduction to graphs and a 
sampling of their numerous and diverse applications. 

439. Combinatorics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 326, 341, and either 377 or 378. 
Counting and enumeration techniques, inversion formulas and their applications, and 
counting schemata relative to permutations of objects. 

441. Advanced Calculus I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 379 and MAT 341. Point set 
theory, sequences, continuity, uniform continuity, limits, mean value theorems, 
L'Hospital's rule. 

442. Advanced Calculus II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 441. Riemann integration, 
Taylor's theorem, improper integrals, infinite series, uniform convergence. 

460. Numerical Analysis I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 326, MAT 379, CSS 240. 
Methods of solving equations and systems of equations, error analysis, difference equa- 
tions. 

461. Numerical Analysis II. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 385, MAT 460, CSS 340. In- 
terpolating polynomial, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solutions of 
differential equations, round off error. 

473. Metric Spaces. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 341. Continuity, Hausdorff and coun- 
tability axioms, products, Euclidean spaces, connectedness, compactness, Heine-Borel and 
Bolzano-Weirstrass theorems. 

475. General Topology I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 341 and MAT 378. General 
topological spaces, bases and subbases, continuity. 

476. General Topology II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 475. Connectedness, separa- 
tion, axioms, countability axioms, compactness, metrizability. 

492. Special Problems I, II. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of department chair- 
man. 

494. Undergraduate Mathematics Seminars I, II. 1 hr. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. Topics of current interest. 

MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY (MET— 397) 

320. Enviromental Controls. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: PHY 332, MET 323. Theory and 
practice of environmental control within closed spaces. 

321. Tools and Fixture Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: INT 250. Design and fabrication 
of production tools, jigs, gages, etc., with emphasis on dimensional control. 

322. Mechanical Power Transmission. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ACT 241, MAT 236. 
Fundamentals of dynamics; dinetics, periodic motion, and energy methods. 

323. Fluid Mechanics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 342. Fluid statics and applications 
of fluid dynamics principles to the analysis and design of fluid systems. 

330. Air Conditioning Design I. 3 hrs. Basic A/C principles and concepts as applied 
to residential and small commerical systems. 



Medical Technology/307 

331. Air Conditioning Design II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MET 330. Basic A/C prin- 
ciples and concepts as applied to large commercial systems. 

332. Air Conditioning Design III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MET 331. An advanced 
course in air conditioning systems design. 

361. Kinematics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ACT 342, INT 250. Graphical and analytical 
analysis of mechanisms. 

362. Machine Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MET 361. Design and selection of 
mechanical elements used in machines. 

392. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of 
faculty adviser. Individual or group study in an area not covered by available courses. 

400. Senior Project. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Senior standing; approval of faculty ad- 
viser. Student required to complete a project in his area of specialization. 

401. Senior Project. 3 hrs. Continuation of MET 400. 

410. Production Materials. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: PSC 330, ACT 342. Study of pro- 
perties of mateirals for cutting, drilling, forming, and heat treating operations. 

411. Industrial Testing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 342. Destructive and nondestruc- 
tive testing of materials and structures. 

441. Mechanical Energy Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 332. Applications of 
thermodynamics to power producing devices. 

444. Solar Heating and Cooling. 3 hrs. Solar Energy conversion methods; collectors; 
residential, commerical heating and cooling, economics of solar energy. Total energy 
systems. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of 
faculty adviser. Supervised study in area not covered by available courses. 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (MTC— 354) 

101. Introduction to Medical Technology. 1 hr. An introduction for incoming 
students to the aims, objectives, and requirements for a career in medical technology. 

302. Clinical Bacteriology I. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: MIC 101 and MIC 411 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Evaluation of clinical specimens with regard to pathogenic 
microorganisms. 

302-L. Clinical Bacteriology I Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

306. Fundamentals of Hematology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
An introduction to the study of blood and blood forming organs. 

306- L. Fundamentals of Hematology Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

309. Clinical Chemistry I. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: Medical Technology majors or per- 
mission of instructor. An introduction to the basic principles of clinical chemistry. 

309-L. Clinical Chemistry I Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

400. Orientation and Ethics. 1 hr. To acquaint the student with professional ethics 
pertaining to the laboratory as well as his role in the field of health services. 

401. Urinalysis. 2 hrs. Analysis of the physical, chemical, and microscopic examina- 
tion of urine with emphasis on understanding the kidney function in diseases. 

402. Clinical Bacteriology II. 5 hrs. Laboratory methods of isolation, identification, 
and other testing of pathogenic bacteria in the relation of disease. 

403. Clinical Mycology. 1 hr. The study of pathogenic fungi. Emphasis is placed on 
laboratory methods of isolation and identification. 

404. Clinical Yirology. 1 hr. The study of pathogenic viruses. Emphasis is placed on 
laboratory methods of isolation and identification of these agents of disease. 



308/Course Descriptions 

405. Clinical Parasitology I. 2 hrs. A lecture and laboratory course on the classifica- 
tion and identification of parasites of pathologic importance to man. 

406. Hematology I. 5 hrs. The study of blood cells and their abnormalities with em- 
phasis on procedures of laboratory examination. 

407. Clinical Serology I. 2 hrs. An introduction to serologic testing, theory, and 
practical experience involving antigen-antibody reactions in relation to disease in man. 

408. Blood Bank I. 4 hrs. The theory and techniques of processing blood for transfu- 
sion purposes. 

409. Clinical Chemistry II. 8 hrs. The qualitative and quantiative chemical analysis 
of blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and other body fluids. 

410. Clinical Isotope Methodology. 1 hr. An introduction to the handling and use of 
radioactive materials as they are used in the clinical laboratory. 

411. Cytogenetics. 1 hr. Karotyping, dermatoglyphic patterns, and other techniques 
used in medical cytogenetics. 

412. Introduction to Pathology. 2 hrs. Introduction to the physical and chemical 
alterations which take place in the human body in the diseased state. 

451. Blood Collection and Urinalysis. 1 hr. Clinical education at one of the affiliated 
hospital laboratories. 

452. Clinical Microbiology. 4 hrs. Clinical education at one of the affiliated hospital 
laboratories. 

455. Clinical Parasitology II. 1 hr. Clinical education at one of the affiliated hospital 
laboratories. 

456. Hematology II. 4 hrs. Clinical education at one of the affiliated hospital 
laboratories. 

457. Clinical Serology II. 1 hr. Clinical education at one of the affiliated hospital 
laboratories. 

458. Blood Bank II. 3 hrs. Clinical education at one of the affiliated hospital 
laboratories. 

459. Clinical Chemistry HI. 4 hrs. Clinical education at one of the affiliated hospital 
laboratories. 

492. Special Problems in Medical Technology I, II, HI, IV. 2-8 hrs. Assignment of a 
specific clinical problem in medical technology under faculty direction. 

MICROBIOLOGY (MIC— 310) 

101. Introduction to Microbiology. 2 hrs. Introduction to basic characteristics of 
microorganisms. A prerequisite for all courses except MIC 261 and MIC 401. 

101 -L. Introduction to Microbiology Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for MIC 101. 

261. Microorganisms in Food. 4 hrs. Microbiology of domestic and commercially 
prepared foods. 

301. Advanced General Microbiology. 2 hrs. Current concepts in microbiology. 
Laboratory devoted to advanced techniques. 

301 -L. Advanced General Microbiology Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

401. Microorganisms in Health and Disease. 4 hrs. A comprehensive survey of 
microorganisms of public health significance for nursing students. 

411. Pathogenic Microbiology. 2 hrs. Schemes for isolation and identification of ma- 
jor groups of disease-producing microorganisms. 

nil. Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory. 2 hrs. 



Military Science/309 

412. Advanced Pathogenic Microbiology. 2 hrs. Continuation of MIC 41 1 on an ad- 
vanced level. 

412-L. Advanced Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

413. Medical Mycology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Considera- 
tion of the fungi of medical significance. 

413-L. Medical Mycology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

421. Virology and Tissue Culture. 2 hrs. Survey of viruses and viral classification, in- 
cluding viral diseases, involving tissue culture techniques. 

421-L. Virology and Tissue Culture Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

422. Viral Pathogenesis and Diagnosis. 2 hrs. Host-Viral interaction from a 
pathological and immunological viewpoint with isolation and laboratory characterization. 

422 L. Viral Pathogenesis and Diagnosis Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

441 . Immunology and Serology. 2 hrs. A study of the cellular, chemical, and genetic 
mechanisms of the immune response. 

441 -L. Immunology and Serology Laboratory. 2 hrs. A laboratory introduction to 
cellular and serologic immune reactions and their diagnostic usefulness. 

455. Microbial Physiology. 3 hrs. A comprehensive survey of bacterial structure, 
nutrition, and biochemistry. 

455-L. Microbial Physiology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

461. Food Microbiology. 2 hrs. Microorganisms affiliated with the preparation, 
spoilage, pathogenicity, and sanitation of foods. 

461 L. Food Microbiology Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

471. Microbiology of Water, Sewage, and Industrial Waste. 2 hrs. Control of pure 
water supply. 

471 -L. Microbiology of Water, Sewage, and Industrial Waste Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

492. Microbiological Problems I, II, III. 2-6 hrs. Given only by special arrangement. 

MILITARY SCIENCE (MS— 276) 
Basic Military Science 

111. The Eagle Challenge. 2 hrs. Introduction to Military Science to include rappel- 
ling, marksmanship, orienteering and backpacking. 

114. Survival Skills. 2 hrs. Introduction to "The Threat", the Soviet Military 
Posture, Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), Canoeing and Wilderness Training. 

117. Marksmanship. 1 hr. A study of the necessary techniques for becoming a skilled 
marksman. 

211. Land Navigation. 2 hrs. An introductory course in the fundamentals of land 
navigation with an emphasis on geographical terrain features and the use of the compass. 

214. Introduction to Principles of Warfare. 2 hrs. A study of the elementary prin- 
ciples of warfare and an introduction to leadership to include individual behavior and 
motivation. 

Advanced Military Science 

301. Problems in Small Unit Leadership and Communications. 4 hrs. A study of 
military communications and the functional approach to small unit leadership. 

302. Small Unit Tactics and Methods of Instruction. 4 hrs. A study of military tactics 
and principles of instructions. 



310/Course Descriptions 

401. Military Team I. 4 hrs. A study of combat operations, staff procedures, 
logistical planning, and military justice. 

402. Military Team II. 4 hrs. A study of the military aspects of world affairs, guer- 
rilla warfare, administration, obligations, and responsibilities of an officer. 

MUSIC (MUS— 675) 

100. Introduction to Music Theory. 3 hrs. An introductory course in the fundamen- 
tals of music theory. Open to all University students. Credit for this course may not be ap- 
plied toward degrees in Music or Music Education. 

101. Music Theory. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MUS 100 or approval of instructor. Scales, 
intervals, and part-writing using triads, the dominant seventh chord, non-harmonic tones, 
modulation, dictation, and sight-singing. Concurrent registration in MUS 101 -L required. 
(JC1214) 

101 -L. Music Theory Laboratory. Ohrs. 

102. Music Theory. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MUS 101. A continuation of MUS 101. 
Concurrent registration in MUS 102-L required. (JC 1224) 

102-L. Music Theory Laboratory. Ohrs. 

131. Introduction to Music Literature. 2 hrs. A course dealing in listening skills, 
musical forms, styles, periods, and performing media. For majors in Music and Music 
Education only. (JC 1 123, 2133, 2142, 2413, 2143, 2443, 2152, 2162) 

201. Advanced Music Theory. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MUS 102. Part-writing, including 
secondary seventh chords, borrowed chords, altered chords, foreign modulation, dictation, 
and sight-singing. Concurrent registration in MUS 201 -L required. (JC 2214) 

201 -L. Advanced Music Theory Laboratory. Ohrs. 

202. Advanced Music Theory. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MUS 201. A continuation of 
MUS 201 . Concurrent registration in MUS 202-L required. (JC 2224) 

202-L. Advanced Music Theory Laboratory. Ohrs. 

231. History of Music. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MUS 131 and MUS 102. Music in 
Western civilization traced from its primitive sources to the present. (JC 21 13, 2313) 

232. History of Music. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MUS 231, and MUS 102. A continua- 
tion of MUS 231 . (JC 2123, 2323) 

301. Twentieth-Century Harmony. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: MUS 202 and MUS 302. In- 
vestigation of the various styles and harmonic elements of 20th-century music, coupled 
with practical applications. 

302. Form and Analysis. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: MUS 202. Music of various periods is 
analyzed formally, harmonically, and contrapuntally. 

311. Composition. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: MUS 301. Composition in the smaller 
forms. Contemporary and stylistic techniques. Steps in the preparation of music for 
publications are included. 

321. Counterpoint. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: MUS 202 or permission of instructor. Two, 
three, and four-voice writing in the style of Palestrina. 

322. Counterpoint. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: MUS 202 or permission of instructor. Two, 
three, and four-voice contrapuntal writing in the style of Bach. 

351. History of Church Music. 3 hrs. History of Christian Church music, with em- 
phasis on the use of literature. 

360. Stylistic Developments in Jazz. 3 hrs. Study of the development of jazz idioms. 
Includes elements of jazz history leading to study of more complex idioms. 

365. The Enjoyment of Music. 3 hrs. Study of the basic elements of music necessary 
for intelligent listening and appreciation. This course may not be applied toward a Bachelor 
of Music or Bachelor of Music Education degree, or a music minor. 



Music/311 



367. Improvisation. 1 hr. Study and performance of jazz improvisation. 



375. Beginning Techniques of Scoring for Jazz Ensembles. 2 hrs. Study in compos- 
ing and arranging music for jazz ensembles. 

376. Intermediate Techniques of Scoring for Jazz Ensembles. 2 hrs. A continuation 
ofMUS375. 

401. Instrumentation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MUS 202. Study of the instruments of the 
band and orchestra. Scoring for instrumental ensembles. 

431. History of Opera. 3 hrs. The history of the musical theatre from Greek drama 
to the present. Open to non-music majors with consent of instructor. 

432. American Music. 3 hrs. Study of the development of music in North America. 
Open to non-music majors with consent of instructor. 

433. 20th-century Music. 3 hrs. Examination of musical trends since Debussy and 
Mahler. Open to non-music majors with consent of instructor. 

434. Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance Music. 3 hrs. A study of music in the an- 
cient world, and of Western music from early Christian times through the sixteenth cen- 
tury. Open to non-majors with consent of instructor. 

435. Baroque Music. 3 hrs. The development of musical styles and forms from 
Monteverdi through J.S. Bach. Open to non-music majors with the consent of instructor. 

436. 18th-century Music. 3 hrs. The development of classical styles and forms, em- 
phasis on style gallant, Empfindsamer Stil, and the Viennese classicists. Open to non-music 
majors with consent of instructor. 

437. 19th-century Music. 3 hrs. The development of musical romanticism, emphasis 
on the expression of classical forms and the appearance of new stylistic concepts. Open to 
non-music majors with consent of instructor. 

439. Diction. 3 hrs. Introduction to phonetics of various foreign languages for 
singing. May be repeated once. Second registration permitted only when languages em- 
phasized are different. 

440. Vocal Literature. 2 hrs. Survey of solo vocal literature from the Renaissance to 
the present. Emphasis upon style, interpretation, and presentation of solo materials for all 
voice classifications. 

441. Vocal Literature. 2 hrs. A continuation of MUS 440. 

442. Piano Literature. 2 hrs. Required of all senior piano majors. 

443. Piano Literature. 2 hrs. A continuation of MUS 442. 

444. Organ Literature. 2 hrs. Required of all organ majors. 

445. Organ Literature. 2 hrs. A continuation of MUS 444. 

446. Instrumental Literature. 2 hrs. Required of all senior instrumental majors. 

447. Instrumental Literature. 2 hrs. A continuation of MUS 446. 

448. Choral Literature. 2 hrs. A survey of accompanied and unaccompanied choral 
music from Gregorian chant through Handel. 

449. Choral Literature. 2 hrs. A continuation of MUS 448. 

450. Symphonic Literature. 3 hrs. History and literature of the symphony orchestra 
from 1600 to the present. Open to non-music majors with consent of instructor. 

451. Chamber Music Literature. 3 hrs. A survey of music for small instrumental 
ensembles. Open to non-music majors with consent of instructor. 

452. Band Literature I. 2 hrs. A survey of band literature, grades I through IV. 

455. Arranging for the Marching Band. 2 hrs. Designed to provide the arranger with 
the essential techniques of scoring for the outdoor band. 



312/Course Descriptions 

456. Choral Arranging. 2 hrs. Basic concepts and techniques of scoring for voices, 
with emphasis on arranging rather than on original compositions for chorus. 

459. Church Music Colloquium. 3 hrs. Philosophies of church music as well as ad- 
ministration, liturgies, and related materials will be studied. 

462. Hymnology. 3 hrs. History of the Christian hymn from its roots to present-day 
form. 

467. Improvisation. 1 hr. A continuation of MUS 367. 

468. Improvisation. 1 hr. A continuation of MUS 467. 

470. Organization and Management of Jazz Ensembles. 3 hrs. Studies in general 
management of commerical and academically-oriented jazz groups. 

475. Advanced Techniques of Scoring for Jazz Ensembles. 2 hrs. A continuation of 
MUS 376. 

476. Advanced Techniques of Scoring for Jazz Ensembles. 2 hrs. A continuation of 

MUS 475. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman. 

MUSIC— APPLIED AND ORGANIZATIONS (APM— 670) 
First Year 
101-102. Piano. 1-3 hrs. (JC 131 1, 1332, 1353; 1321, 1342, 1363; 1362, 1373) 
111-112. Organ. 1-3 hrs. (JC 161 1, 1631, 1633; 1621, 1642, 1643; 1653) 
114-115. Flute. 1-3 hrs. 
117-118. Oboe. 1-3 hrs. 
120-121. Clarinet. 1-3 hrs. 
123 124. Saxophone. 1-3 hrs. 
126-127. Bassoon. 1-3 hrs. 
129-130. Horn 1-3 hrs. 
132-133. Trumpet. 1-3 hrs. 
135-136. Trombone. 1-3 hrs. 
138-139. Euphonium. 1-3 hrs. 
141-142. Tuba. 1-3 hrs. 
144-145. Violin. 1-3 hrs. 
147-148. Viola. 1-3 hrs. 
150-151. Cello. 1-3 hrs. 
153-154. String Bass. 1-3 hrs. 
156-157. Percussion. 1-3 hrs. 

161-162. Voice. 1-3 hrs. (JC 1432, 1453; 1453, 1463, 1473) 
164-165. Harp. 1-3 hrs. 
167-168. Guitar. 1-3 hrs. 
171 172. Chamber Music. 1 hr. 

181. Orchestra. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

182. Band. I hr. (May be taken two times) (JC 171 1, 1721) 

183. Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) (JC 181 1 , 1821) 



Music/313 

184. Jazz Lab Band. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

185. Collegium Musicum. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 
185. Women's Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

187. Men's Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

188. University Singers. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

189. Chamber Singers. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 
191-192. Composition. 1 hr. 

199. Recital Class. hrs. (Two semesters) 

Second Year 
201-202. Piano. 1-3 hrs. (JC 231 1, 2331, 2352, 2353; 2321, 2341 , 2362, 2363; 2373) 
211-212. Organ. 1-3 hrs. (JC 261 1, 2632, 2633; 2621, 2642, 2653) 
214-215. Flute. 1-3 hrs. 
217-218. Oboe. 1-3 hrs. 
220-221. Clarinet. 1-3 hrs. 
223-224. Saxophone. 1-3 hrs. 
226-227. Bassoon. 1-3 hrs. 
229-230. Horn. 1-3 hrs. 
232 233. Trumpet. 1 3 hrs. 
235-236. Trombone. 1-3 hrs. 
238 239. Euphonium. 1 3 hrs. 
241-242. Tuba. 1-3 hrs. 
244-245. Violin. 1-3 hrs. 
247-248. Viola. 1-3 hrs. 
250-251. Cello. 1-3 hrs. 
253-254. String Bass. 1-3 hrs. 
256-257. Percussion. 1-3 hrs. 

261-262. Voice. 1-3 hrs. (JC 241 1; 2432, 2453; 2413, 2442, 2463; 2473 
264-265. Harp. 1-3 hrs. 
267-268. Guitar. 1-3 hrs. 
271272. ChamberMusic. 1 hr. 

281. Orchestra. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

282. Band. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) (JC 271 1, 2721) 

283. Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) (JC 281 1 , 2821) 

284. Jazz Lab Band. I hr. (May be taken two times) 

285. Collegium Musicum. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

286. Woman's Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

287. Men's Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

288. University Singers. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

289. Chamber Singers. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 



314/Course Descriptions 

291-292. Composition. 1 hr. 

299. Recital Class. Ohrs. (Two semesters) 

Third Year 
301-302. Piano. 1-3 hrs. 
311-312. Organ. 1-3 hrs. 
314-315. Flute. 1-3 hrs. 
317-318. Oboe. 1-3 hrs. 
320-321. Clarinet. 1-3 hrs. 
323-324. Saxophone. 1-3 hrs. 
326-327. Bassoon. 1-3 hrs. 
329-330. Horn. 1-3 hrs. 
332-333. Trumpet. 1 -3 hrs. 
335-336. Trombone. 1-3 hrs. 
338-339. Euphonium. 1 3 hrs. 
341-342. Tuba. 1-3 hrs. 
344-345. Violin. 1-3 hrs. 
347-348. Viola. 1-3 hrs. 
350-351. Cello. 1-3 hrs. 
353-354. String Bass. 1-3 hrs. 
356-357. Percussion. 1-3 hrs. 
361-362. Voice. 1-3 hrs. 
364-365. Harp. 1-3 hrs. 
367-368. C-uitar. 1-3 hrs. 
370. Recital. 0-1 hr. 
371-372. Chamber Music. 1 hr. 
375-376. Accompanying. 1 hr. 

381. Orchestra. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

382. Band. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

383. Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

384. Jazz Lab Band. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

385. Collegium Musicum. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

386. Women's Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

387. Men's Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two limes) 

388. University Singers. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

389. Chamber Singers. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 
391-392. Composition. 1-3 hrs. 

399. Recital Class. Ohrs. (Two semesters) 

Fourth Year 
401-402. Piano. 1-3 hrs. 
411-412. Organ. 1-3 hrs. 



Music Education/3 15 

414-415. Flute. 1-3 hrs. 
417-418. Oboe. 1-3 hrs. 
420-421. Clarinet. 1-3 hrs. 
423-424. Saxophone. 1-3 hrs. 
426-427. Bassoon. 1-3 hrs. 
429-430. Horn. 1-3 hrs. 
432-433. Trumpet. 1-3 hrs. 
435-436. Trombone. 1-3 hrs. 
438-439. Euphonium. 1-3 hrs. 
441-442. Tuba. 1-3 hrs. 
444-445. Violin. 1-3 hrs. 
447-448. Viola. 1-3 hrs. 
450-451. Cello. 1-3 hrs. 
453-454. String Bass. 1-3 hrs. 
456-457. Percussion. 1-3 hrs. 
461-462. Voice. 1-3 hrs. 
464-465. Harp. 1-3 hrs. 
467-468. Guitar. 1-3 hrs. 
470. Recital. 1-2 hrs. 
471-472. Chamber Music. 1 hr. 
475-476. Accompanying. 1 hr. 

481 . Orchestra. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

482. Band. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

483. Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

484. Jazz Lab Band. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

485. Collegium Musicum. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

486. Women's Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

487. Men's Chorus. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

488. University Singers. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 

489. Chamber Singers. 1 hr. (May be taken two times) 
491 492. Composition. 1-3 hrs. 

499. Recital Class. Ohrs. (Two semesters) 

MUSIC EDUCATION (MED 680) 

101. Class Piano I. 2 hrs. Beginning class instruction in piano. 

102. Class Piano II. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: MED 101 or permission of instructor. In- 
termediate class instruction in piano. 

219. Guitar Class I. 1 hr. Class instruction in guitar for beginners. 

220. Guitar Class II. 1 hr. Prerequisite: MED 219 or approval of instructor. In- 
termediate class instruction in guitar. 



3 16/Course Descriptions 

221. String Class. 1 hr. Practical class instruction on all strings. Problems of begin- 
ning students; material for public school classes. 

222. String Class. 1 hr. A continuation of MED 221. 

301. Voice Class. 2 hrs. Designed to give the instrumental major a general knowledge 
of vocal and choral techniques. 

311. Elementary Music Methods. 3 hrs. Music education programs for the elemen- 
tary student. Emphasis is placed on the total curriculum. 

312. Secondary Music Methods. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MED 31 1. Consideration of the 
secondary music program. Special attention is given to the development of a balanced cur- 
riculum. 

321. String Methods. 1 hr. Instruction on all strings for students not following the 
curriculum in instrumental music education. 

322. Woodwind Methods. 1 hr. Instruction on clarinet, flute, oboe, and bassoon for 
students not following the curriculum in instrumental music education. 

323. Brass Methods. 1 hr. Instruction on all brasses for students not following the 
curriculum in instrumental music education. 

331. Conducting. 1 hr. Prerequisites: MUS 202, or consent of instructor. Techni- 
ques of choral and instrumental conducting. 

332. Conducting. 2 hrs. A continuation of MED 331. 

361. Music for Elementary Teachers I. 3 hrs. Designed to provide students with a 
basic knowledge of notation, singing, and the use of the autoharp and piano. Credit for this 
course may not be applied toward degrees in Music or Music Education. 

382. Recreational Music. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MED 361 or consent of instructor. 
Materials and techniques useful in developing recreational music programs. 

390. Piano Workshop. 2 hrs. Designed to meet the needs of the piano teacher, in- 
cluding a survey of materials and modern teaching methods. Credit for this course may not 
be applied toward degrees in Music and Music Education. 

391. Instrumental Workshop. 2 hrs. Survey and analysis of problems relating to in- 
strumental music education through lecture, performance, and discussion. Credit for this 
course may not be applied toward degrees in Music and Music Education. 

392. Choral Workshop. 2 hrs. Examination, study, and analysis of choral techniques 
and procedures. Credit for this course may not be applied toward degrees in Music and 
Music Education. 

393. Elementary Music Workshop. 2 hrs. Intensive examination of current pro- 
blems, trends, and materials in elementary music education. Credit for this course may not 
be applied toward degrees in Music and Music Education. 

395. Instrumental Conductors Conference. 2 hrs. Survey and analysis of problems 
relating to instrumental music. Credit for this course may not be applied toward degrees in 
Music and Music Education. May be taken three times (total of 6 hours). 

396. Choral Conductors Conference. 2 hrs. Survey and analysis of choral techni- 
ques. Credit for this course may not be applied toward degrees in Music and Music Educa- 
tion. 

411. Choral Methods and Curriculum Problems. 3 hrs. Organization and ad- 
ministration of choral activities in secondary schools. 

412. Instrumental Methods and Curriculum Problems. 3 hrs. Techniques of develop- 
ing successful marching/concert bands and orchestras. Emphasis on current trends in 
music education. 

421. Woodwind Class. 1 hr. Study of basic techniques in the pedagogy of all major 
woodwind instruments. 



Music Education/317 



422. Woodwind Class. I hr. A continuation of MED 421. 



423. Organ Construction and Design. 3 hrs. Study of basic elements of organ 
building and registration. 

424. Instrument Repair. 3 hrs. Practical experience in preventive maintainance and 
minor repair and adjustment of string, woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments. 

425. Brass Class. 1 hr. Study of basic techniques in the pedagogy of all brass in- 
struments. 

426. Brass Class. 1 hr. A continuation of MED 425. 

427. Percussion Class. 1 hr. Review of percussion texts, techniques, and pedagogy. 
Percussion majors may substitute a brass, string, or woodwind minor instrument for MED 

427. 

428. Percussion Class. 1 hr. A continuation of MED 427. 

429. Piano Tuning and Repair. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. Study of 
basic technique of tuning and repairing pianos. 

439. Vocal Techniques and Materials. 3 hrs. Techniques and procedures for teaching 
correct vocal production habits; examination of choral literature for secondary and col- 
legiate groups. 

440. Music Education in the Elementary Schools. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MED 311, 
312. An in-depth course which examines current techniques and methods of music pro- 
grams in upper and lower elementary grades. 

450. Vocal Pedogogy. 2 hrs. Techniques, practices, and materials used in teaching 
voice; practical experience in teaching voice. 

451. Vocal Pedagogy. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: MED 450. A continuation of MED 450. 

452. Piano Pedagogy. 2 hrs. Modern methods of teaching; lectures, observation of 
private and class lessons; teaching piano to adults. Required of all senior piano majors. 

453. Piano Pedagogy. 2 hrs. A continuation of MED 452. 

454. Organ Pedagogy. 2 hrs. Required of all senior organ majors. 

455. Organ Pedagogy. 2 hrs. A continuation of MED 454. 

456. String Pedagogy. 2 hrs. Requried of all senior string majors. 

457. String Pedagogy. 2 hrs. A continuation of MED 456. 

458. Wind Pedagogy. 2 hrs. Required of all senior wind majors. 

459. Wind Pedagogy. 2 hrs. A continuation of MED 458. 

462. Music for Elementary Teachers II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MED 361. Application 
of the fundamental skills of MED 361 in the selection of music materials and methods of 
presentation. Credit for this course may not be applied toward degrees in Music and Music 
Education. 

490. Piano Workshop. 2 hrs. A continuation of MED 390. Credit for this course 
may not be applied toward degrees in Music and Music Education. 

491. Instrumental Workshop. 2 hrs. A continuation of MED 391. Credit for this 
course may not be applied toward degrees in Music and Music Education. 

492. Choral Workshop. 2 hrs. A continuation of MED 392. Credit for this course 
may not be applied toward degrees in Music and Music Education. 

493. Elementary Music Workshop. 2 hrs. A continuation of MED 393. Credit for 
this course may not be applied toward degrees in Music or Music Education. 

495. Instrumental Conductors Conference. 2 hrs. Survey and analysis of problems 
relating to instrumental music. Credit for this course may not be applied toward degrees in 
Music and Music Education. May be taken three times (total of 6 hours). 



318/Course Descriptions 

496. Choral Conductors Conference. 2 hrs. Survey and analysis of choral techni- 
ques. Credit for this course may not be applied toward degrees in Music and Music Educa- 
tion. May be taken three times (total of 6 hours). 



NURSING (NSG— 070) 

NOTE: Students will be guided by their nursing adviser in the sequence of courses and 
their prerequisites. 

101. Introduction to the Health Professions. 1 hr. An introduction to the members 
of the health professions and allied groups. 

111. Requirements for Nursing Practice. 1 hr. An examination of the educational, 
legal, ethical, and moral requirements for the practice of nursing. 

201. A Current and Historical Perspective of Nursing. 1 hr. An overview of roles 
assumed by nurses in the past, roles currently assumed by nurses, and future trends. 

211-L. Basic Nursing Technologies. 1 hr. Simulated situations serve as the basis for 
teaching selected technical skills utilized in the practice of nursing. 

304. Nursing to Promote Health in the Life Cycle. 4 hrs. An integration of sciences 
into nursing where the health focus is on the life cycle. Major content areas will be promo- 
tion of health and protection against disease and injury. 

314-L. Practicum: Nursing to Promote Health in the Life Cycle. 4 hrs. The applica- 
tion of self-care practices and technologies in a clinical setting utilizing the nursing process. 

324. Nursing in the Treatment and Recovery of Disease. 4 hrs. The development of 
nursing agency to assist during the processes of active treatment of, and recovery from a 
disease disorder of determined origin. 

334 L. Practicum: Nursing in the Treatment and Recovery of Disease. 4 hrs. The 
application of nursing agency with individuals who are experiencing active treatment or 
recovery of disease of determined origin. 

344. Health Deviations. 4 hrs. An analysis of altered body physiology in health 
deviations. 

351. Introduction to Pharmacology for Nursing. 1 hr. An overview of the 
parameters of pharmacology and the pharmacodynamics of various drugs. 

404. Nursing in Illness of Undetermined and Developmental Origin. 4 hrs. The 
development of nursing agency to assist individuals with illness of an undetermined origin, 
of a developmental nature, or with biological immaturity. 

414-L. Practicum: Nursing in Illness of Undetermined and Developmental Origin. 4 

hrs. The application of nursing agency with individuals who are experiencing an illness of 
undetermined origin, of a developmental nature, or with biologic immaturity. 

424. Nursing to Promote Restoration, Stabilization, or Control of Integrated Func- 
tioning. 4 hrs. The adaptation of nursing agency to assist individuals and families 
manifesting needs for restoration, stabilization, or control of integrated functioning. 

434-1.. Practicum: Nursing to Promote Restoration, Stabilization, or Control of In- 
tegrated Functioning. 4 hrs. The application of nursing agency to assist individuals in the 
restoration, stabilization, or control of integrated functioning. 

444. Professional Dimensions of Nursing I. 4 hrs. An in-depth focus on the profes- 
sional components of nursing. 

451. Nursing Leadership and Management. 3 hrs. Elective. Designed to enrich the 
student's knowledge of nursing leadership and management within the framework of 
health care facilities. 

452. Teaching in Nursing. 3 hrs. Elective. Basic principles of learning and teaching as 
applied to nursing. 



Philosophy/319 

454. Professional Dimensions of Nursing II. 2 hrs. A continuation of professional 
dimensions of Nursing I, with an expanded focus on the professional components of nurs- 
ing. 

462-L. Enhancement of Individual Nursing Agency. 2 hrs. Development of nursing 
agency in an area of clinical interest of the student's choice. 

492. Directed Study of Nursing. 1 -6 hrs. On approval of department chairman. 

PHILOSOPHY (PHI— 284) 

HUM 316. Impact of Science on History. May also be offered for credit as a 
philosophy course. 

HUM 380. History of Philosophy. May also be offered for credit as a philosophy 
course. 

151. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 hrs. An introduction to the methods and major 
themes of philosophy. (JC 21 13, 2123) 

253. Logic. 3 hrs. An introduction to induction, deduction, fallacies, scientific 
method, and symbolic logic. (JC 2713) 

310. Classical Philosophy. 3 hrs. An outline survey of Greek philosophical thought. 

312. Modern Philosophy. 3 hrs. Survey of 17th and 18th century European 
philosophy. 

352. Oriental Philosophy. 3 hrs. A survey of the philosophical thought of India and 
the Far East. 

353. Study of a Major Philosopher. 3 hrs. May be repeated for credit to a total of 
nine hours. A detailed examination of a selected philosopher. 

354. Theories of Knowledge. 3 hrs. An examination of classical and contemporary 
theories in epistemology. 

356. Ethics. 3 hrs. An examination of classical and contemporary moral theory. 

372. Philosophy of Religion. 3 hrs. An examination of classical problems in 
philosophical theology. 

406. Philosophy of Man. 3 hrs. Philosophical consideration of the nature of man in- 
cluding topics in philosophical anthropology and philosophy of mind. 

415. Philosophy for Teachers of Children. 3 hrs. Survey and development of the 
materials and skills to teach children philosophically. 

420. Metaphysics. 3 hrs. Analysis of classical and contemporary problems in 
metaphysics. 

426. Philosophy Summer Lectures in England. 3-6 hrs. An introduction to the 
language and techniques of philosophy relevant to practical, critical problems. 

436. Aesthetics. 3 hrs. Philosophical analysis of theories of art and beauty. 

440. American Philosophy. 3 hrs. Survey of the development of philosophy in 
America and major American philosophers. 

450. Existentialism and Phenomenology. 3 hrs. An examination of the central 
themes in contemporary European existentialism and phenomenology. 

451. Political Philosophy. 3 hrs. The major schools of political philosophy from 
classical to contemporary times. 

452. Philosophy of Health Care. 3 hrs. An examination of various conceptual and 
ethical issues in the health care professions. 

453. Philosophy of Law. 3 hrs. An inquiry into theories of law. 

456. Philosophy of Science. 3 hrs. Examination of the foundations of science and 
scientific explanation. 



320/Course Descriptions 

458. Symbolic Logic. 3 hrs. The basic theory and operations of the propositional 
calculus, quantification, and the logic of relations. 

460. Analytic Philosophy. 3 hrs. An examination of the central themes in contem- 
porary British-American analytic philosophy. 

492. Special Problems. 3 hrs. A problem study to be approved by the department 
chairman. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PED— 730) 

100. Aerobics. 1 hr. 

118. Team Sports. 1 hr. 

119. Beginning Volleyball. 1 hr. 

130. Four Wall Sports. 1 hr. 

131. Fencing. 1 hr. 

132. Beginning Badminton. 1 hr. 

133. Beginning Archery. 1 hr. 

134. Beginning Golf. 1 hr. 

135. Beginning Yoga. 1 hr. 

140. Bicycling. 1 hr. 

141. Beginning Tennis. 1 hr. 

142. Snow Skiing. 1 hr. 

143. Roller Dance Skating. 1 hr. 

146. Developmental Skills. 1 hr. PED majors or minors only. 

147. Developmental Skills. 1 hr. PED majors or minors only. 

148. Developmental Skills. 1 hr. PED majors or minors only. 

150. Tumbling, Beam, and Floor Exercises. 1 hr. 

151. Tumbling, Uneven Parallel Bars and Vaulting. 1 hr. 

152. Men's Beginning Gymnastics Apparatus. 1 hr. 

153. Beginning Trampoline. 1 hr. 
160. Beginning Swimming. 1 hr. 
163. Aquatic Sports. 1 hr. 

170. Sport Judo. I hr. 

181. Beginning Social Dance. 1 hr. 

184. Beginning Square Dance. 1 hr. 

218. Officiating Techniques in Women's Sports. 3 hrs. 

220. Introduction to Health and Physical Education. 3 hrs. Survey of the areas of 
health and physical education. 

250. Women's Intermediate Gymnastics Apparatus, I hr. 

284. Creative Rhythms. 3 hrs. 

301. Kinesiology. 3 hrs. Analysis of movement in body mechanics. 

303. Evaluation in Health and Physical Education. 3 hrs. Administration and inter 
prctation of tests in health, physical fitness, and skills. 

310. Special Topics Seminar. I hr. 



Physics/321 



314. Instructional Techniques in Team Sports. 3 hrs. 



320. Preschool and Primary School Physical Education. 3 hrs. An introduction to 
philosophy, objectives, methods, and curriculum content. 

321. Elementary and Middle School Physical Education. 3 hrs. Philosophy, objec- 
tives, methods, and curriculum. 

323. Efficiency of Human Movement. 3 hrs. A study of the mechanical principles af- 
fecting human movement. 

326. Instructional Techniques in Individual and Dual Sports. 3 hrs. 

334. Golf. 1 hr. 

341. Tennis. 1 hr. 

360. Theory of Teaching Swimming and Diving. 2 hrs. Organization and administra- 
tion of the community swimming program. 

361. Swimming for the Disabled. 1 hr. The development of techniques and activities 
in teaching the disabled to swim. 

370. Advanced Sport Judo. 1 hr. 

380. Creative Rhythms for the Disabled. 1 hr. The development of techniques and 
activities used in teaching rhythms and dance to the disabled. 

401. Corrective, Adaptive, and Developmental Physical Education. 3 hrs. Recogni- 
tion of, and corrective exercises for, functional abnormalities. 

402. Physiology of Exercise. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: HSE 315. A study of the 
physiological changes which occur in the body during muscular activity. 

403. Fundamental Motor Patterns. 3 hrs. An analysis of the fundamental motor pat- 
terns developed during early childhood. 

404. Motor Development. 3 hrs. A study of the motor aspects of the total human 
growth and development process. 

410. Physical Education and Recreation for the Educationally Disabled and Other 
Disorders. 3 hrs. The development of concepts and knowledge of physical education pro- 
grams for LD, MR, and ED. 

411. Physical Education and Recreation for the Crippled and Other Health Im- 
paired. 3 hrs. The development of concepts and knowledge for programs for CP, PH in- 
dividuals. 

412. Sports Programs for the Disabled. 3 hrs. Competitive sports programming and 
special techniques for preparing disabled individuals for participation. 

415. Motor Development Project. 3 hrs. 

420. Practicum in Physical Education. 1-6 hrs. arr. May be repeated for a total of six 
hours. Experiences in the various phases of the physical education program. 

424. Seminar in Elementary Physical Education. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: PED 320 or 
321. 

426. Organization and Administration of Health and Physical Education. 3 hrs. 

450. Movement Experiences for Young Children. 2 hrs. 

45 1 . Techniques of Teaching Stunts, Tumbling, and Use of Apparatus. 3 hrs. 
490. Physical Education and Recreation for the Handicapped. 3 hrs. 



PHYSICS (PHY— 360) 

101. General Physics. 3 hrs. A traditional course in physics intended for liberal arts 
and pre-medical students. (JC2313, 2414) 



322/Course Descriptions 

101 -L. General Physics Laboratory. 1 hr. 

102. General Physics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 101. A continuation of PHY 101. 
(JC 2323, 2424) 

102-L. General Physics Laboratory. 1 hr. 

105. Applied Physics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 101. Basic concepts of mechanics, 
heat, and sound applying to industry and research. 

105-L. Applied Physics Laboratory. 1 hr. 

106. Applied Physics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 105. Basic concepts of light, elec- 
tricity, and magnetism applying to industry and research. 

106-L. Applied Physics Laboratory. 1 hr. 

201 . General Physics with Calculus. 4 hrs. Corequisite: MAT 278. A rigorous course 
in physics recommended for physics majors. Required for engineering students. (JC 2514) 

201 -L. General Physics with Calculus Laboratory. 1 hr. 

202. General Physics with Calculus. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 201. A continuation 
of PHY 201. (JC 2524) 

202-L. General Physics with Calculus Laboratory. 1 hr. 

327. Electronics I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 102, 202, or 106. Fundamentals of 
vacuum and semiconductor devices with applications to scientific instrumentation. 

327-L. Electronics I Laboratory. 1 hr. 

328. Electronics II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 327. A continuation of PHY 327. 
328-L. Electronics II Laboratory. 1 hr. 

331. Thermodynamics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 102, 106, or 202. Temperature, 
thermodynamic systems, laws of thermodynamics, entropy. 

331-L. Thermodynamics Laboratory. 1 hr. 

332. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 361. 

341. Optics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission. Rays, refractive and reflective surfaces, 
len design, and the electromagnetic theory of light. 
341-L. Optics Laboratory. 1 hr. 

350. Mechanics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission. Mathematical treatment of the 
dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. 

351. Mechanics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 350. A continuation of PHY 350. 

361. Physics of the Atom. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 102, 106, or 202. Survey of 
atomic particles, radiation, and x-rays. Optical Spectra. 

361 -L. Physics of the Atom Laboratory. 1 hr. 

392. Physics Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission. Theoretical and 
experimental problems limited to junior and senior students. 

421. Electricity and Magnetism. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 361 . Vector analysis, elec- 
trostatistics, magnetostatics, and electromagnetic fields. 

422. Electricity and Magnetism. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 421. A continuation of 
PHY42I. 

423. Electrical Measurements Laboratory. I hr. Prerequisite: Permission. 

435. Principles of Microwave Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission. Introduction 
to microwave theory, basic design of microwave systems. 

444. Acoustics and Hi-Fi. 3 hrs. The study of all components comprising high- 
fidelity sound systems. 



Political Science/323 

455. Fluid Dynamics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: PHY 350 and MAT 405. A mathematical 
development of the physical principles governing fluid flow. 

460. Advanced Physics Laboratory. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission. Advanced ex- 
periments in modern physics. 

461. Modern Physics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission. Relativity, quantum theory, 
spectroscopy, and atomic and nuclear structure. 

462. Modern Physics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 461 . A continuation of PHY 461. 

464. Fundamentals of Solid State Physics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission. 

465. Nuclear Physics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission. Nuclear binding forces, chain 
reactions, and nuclear reactors. 

485. History and Literature of Physics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PHY 102, 106, or 202. A 
survey of physics from the ancients to the present. 

499. Undergraduate Research. 1-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission. An introduction to 
the methods of physical research. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE (PS— 280) 

101. American Government. 3 hrs. (JC 1 1 13) 

220. Introduction to Political Science. 3 hrs. A survey of the general field of study of 
political science to prepare students for subsequent study in a specific subject and field. (JC 
2213) 

301 . State and Local Politics. 3 hrs. 

302. Current Problems in Government. 3 hrs. A study of current problems before 
the national, state, and local governments at the time the course is taught. 

303. American Political Movements. 3 hrs. A study of Afro-American, Old and New 
Left, Radical Right, Counter-Culture, and Feminist movements. 

320. Introduction to Political Theory. 3 hrs. A survey of the principal political 
ideologies in the world today. 

330. United States Foreign Policy. 3 hrs. 

331 . Introduction to International Politics. 3 hrs. 

351. Introduction to Comparative Government. 3 hrs. A classification of selected 
political systems analyzed in the context of different economic and political cultures. 

370. Introduction to Public Administration. 3 hrs. 

375. Government and Economics. 3 hrs. 

380. Introduction to Law in American Society. 3 hrs. A basic course to familiarize 
students with the court structure, the legal profession, and the role of law in American 
society. 

381. Introduction to Paralegalism. 3 hrs. An introduction to the field of 
paralegalism including the history and scope of the profession. 

382. Legal Drafting and Civil Litigation. 3 hrs. An introduction to the required con- 
tent of basic legal documents and the mechanics of civil litigation. 

383. Legal Research. 3 hrs. A summary of primary and secondary legal sources in- 
cluding reports, digests, statutes, citations, and other basic materials used in legal research. 

389. Internship in Paralegal Studies. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PS 381, 382, and 383 and 
permission of the director. The course is open only to paralegal majors and minors. 

401. Political Socialization. 3 hrs. An analysis of the American political system on an 
advanced level. 

402. Urban Politics. 3 hrs. 



324/Course Descriptions 

404. The Legislative Process. 3 hrs. 

406. American Political Parties and Pressure Groups. 3 hrs. 

407. Mississippi Government. 3 hrs. 

408. The American Presidency. 3 hrs. An analysis of the selection, role, power, and 
performance of the presidency. 

409. Southern Politics. 3 hrs. An examination of the politics and political culture of 
the southern states. 

420. Political Theory to Locke. 3 hrs. 

421 . Political Theory Locke to Present. 3 hrs. 
425. American Political Theory. 3 hrs. 

431. International Organization. 3 hrs. 

432. Foreign Policies of the Major Powers. 3 hrs. An intensive analysis of the pattern 
of politics resulting from the formation of the two major power blocs and lesser blocs. 

434. Inter-American Politics. 3 hrs. A study of hemisphere relations, with emphasis 
on the United States and Latin America, bilaterally and multilaterally. 

435. Comparative Foreign Policy. 3 hrs. 

450. Comparative Studies in European Politics. 3 hrs. 

45 1 . Soviet Government and Politics. 3 hrs. 

452. The Political Systems of Great Britian and the Commonwealth. 3 hrs. 

453. Government and Politics in the Middle East. 3 hrs. 

455. Government and Politics in Tropical Africa. 3 hrs. 

456. Latin American Governments and Politics. 3 hrs. 

458. Latin American Political and Economic Development. 3 hrs. 

471. Public Personnel Administration. 3 hrs. 

472. Organization and Management. 3 hrs. 

473. Public Policy. 3 hrs. 

474. Governmental Budgetary Process. 3 hrs. Facets of budgetary administration, 
emphasizing federal and municipal budgets, theory and process. 

480. United States Constitutional Law. 3 hrs. 

481. The American Judicial Process. 3 hrs. 

482. Comparative Judicial Politics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PS 480 or PS 481 or consent 
of instructor. 

484. Administrative Law. 3 hrs. 

485. International Law. 3 hrs. 

489. U.S. Supreme Court and Civil Liberties. 3 hrs. An analysis of the role of the 
U.S. Supreme Court in protecting individual rights. Primary focus is on litigation involving 
provisions of the Bill of Rights. 

491. Proseminar in Political Science. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. An 
undergraduate seminar devoted to topics selected by the supervising professor. May be 
repeated once for credit with change in content. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 



Polymer Science/325 

POLYMER SCIENCE (PSC— 370) 

(See also FORENSIC SCIENCE) 

191. The Polymer Industry I, II. 2 hrs. each. An introduction to the history, recent 
developments, applications, and processing of polymers. 

291. The Polymer Industry III, IV. 2 hrs. each. An introduction to the properties of 
major commercial polymers, raw material sources, and the organization of the polymer in- 
dustry. 

301 . Organic Polymer Chemistry I. 3 hrs. Systematic study of polymers with em- 
phasis centered on those synthesized by step-growth polymerization. 

301-L. Laboratory for Polymer Science 301. 1 hr. 

302. Organic Polymer Chemistry II. 3 hrs. A study of polymer formation techni- 
ques, kinetics, and properties with emphasis on addition polymerization, copolymeriza- 
tion, and stereoregular polymerization. 

302-L. Laboratory for Polymer Science 302. 1 hr. 

310. Technical and Scientific Communication. 1 hr. Training in the preparation of 
written and oral reports on scientific and technical problems. 

330. Structure of Materials. 3 hrs. An introduction to the physical character of 
materials emphasizing the relationship of structure to fundamental composition. 

350. Polymeric Materials. 3 hrs. Introduction to materials science. Comparison of 
structure and properties of polymers to non-polymeric materials. 

360. Polymer Rheology. 3 hrs. Theory and practice. 

361. Polymer Processing I. 3 hrs. Plastics extrusion technology and theory. 
Technical planning for plastics production. Material selection for plastic products. Trends 
in the plastics industry. 

361 -L. Laboratory for Polymer Science 361. 2 hrs. 

370. Surface Coatings Science I. 3 hrs. Introduction to surface coatings. 

371. Surface Coatings Science II. 3 hrs. Introduction to surface coatings. A con- 
tinuation of PSC 370. 

401. Physical Chemistry for Polymers I. 3 hrs. Polymer structure, chain conforma- 
tion, solution properties, thermodynamics, fractionation, and molecular weight measure- 
ment. 

401-L. Laboratory for Polymer Science 401. 1 hr. 

402. Physical Chemistry of Polymers II. 3 hrs. Instrumental analysis of polymers, 
morphology, rheology, structure-property relationships. 

402-L. Laboratory for Polymer Science 402. 1 hr. 

412. Introduction to Macromolecules. 3 hrs. An introduction to the chemistry and 
physics of natural and synthetic high polymers. 

430. Plastics, Ceramics, Composites. 3 hrs. A comparative study of the physical pro- 
perty behavior of non-metallic materials in pure form and in combination. 

460. Physical Properties of Polymers I. 3 hrs. Mechanical and electrical properties of 
polymers as viscoelastic materials emphasizing the effects of time and temperature at cons- 
tant stress levels. 

460-L. Laboratory for Polymer Science 460. 1 hr. 

461. Physical Properties of Polymers II. 3 hrs. Mechanical and electrical properties 
of polymers as materials emphasizing the effects of time and temperature at variable stress 
levels. 

461 I.. Laboratory for Polymer Science 461. 1 hr. 



326/Course Descriptions 

470. Surface Coatings. 4 hrs. Study of the physical and chemical properties of the 
pigments, binders, solvents, and additives employed in surface coatings; dispersion techni- 
ques, surface preparation, paint testing, application techniques, and surface coatings muta- 
tions analysis are also discussed. 

470-L. Laboratory for Polymer Science 470. 1 hr. 

480. Polymer Kinetics. 3 hrs. Introduction to polymerization kinetics and reactor 
design. 

490. Special Projects in Polymer Science. 1 hr. Individual research. Prospectus is 
prepared and research plan is executed with final status report required. 

490-L. Laboratory for Polymer Science 490. 3 hrs. 

491. Special Projects in Polymer Science. 1 hr. Individual research. Prospectus is 
prepared and research plan is executed with final status report required. 

491 -L. Laboratory for Polymer Science 491. 3 hrs. 

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY— 175) 

110. General Psychology. 3 hrs. Open to freshmen. An introduction to the scientific 
study of human behavior and experience. (JC 1513) 

231. Mental Hygiene. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PSY 1 10. Understanding of the problems 
people face in our society, and the diverse ways in which they respond to these problems. 

251. Applied Psychology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PSY 110. Application of 
psychological methods and principles to a number of occupational fields other than educa- 
tion. 

310. Advanced General Psychology. 3 hrs. An advanced course in general 
psychology covering in greater depth selected topics. Required of all psychology majors. 

320. Experimental Psychology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: PSY 310 and 360. Introduction 
to experimental methodology and laboratory apparatus with application to various areas of 
psychology. 

360. Introduction to Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences. 3 hrs. Probability, central 
tendency, variability, and correlation. Hypothesis testing with Z, t, chi-square, and F. 

375. Developmental Psychology. 3 hrs. A study of the course of growth and develop- 
ment throughout the life span, with emphasis on principles of development. Students who 
take EPY 370 or 372 should not take this course. 

418. History and Systems of Psychology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the in- 
structor. Review of the history of psychology and intensive study of current systems of 
psychology. Primarily for senior psychology majors. 

420. Sensation and Perception. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PSY 320. A survey of sensory 
and perceptual processes with emphasis on the visual system. 

422. Psychology of Learning. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PSY 320. A study of the basic pro- 
blems, theories, concepts, and research in the areas of human and animal learning. 

424. Animal Behavior. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PSY 320. Study of animal behavior with 
emphasis on the comparison of psychological processes along the phylogenetic scale. 

426. Physiological Psychology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PSY 1 10. Relationships between 
physiological functions, especially those of the nervous system, and emotional behavior, 
motivation, and learning. 

432. Introduction to Behavior Modification. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. Principles and techniques of behavior modification applied to normal and deviant 
behavior across environmental settings. 

436. Abnormal Psychology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Study 
of the major psychoneuroses, and menial deficiency; field trips, and demonstration clinics. 



Radio, Television, Film/327 

450. Social Psychology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PSY 110. Study of social influences on 
personality development and perceptual-cognitive processes and social motivation. 

451. Industrial Psychology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: PSY NO. (PSY 360 recommended.) 
Applications of psychological principles and methods to problems of industry. 

455. Psychology of Personality. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: PSY 1 10 and permission of the 
instructor. Different theoretical approaches to the development of the mature personality. 

456. Psychology of Aging and Death. 3 hrs. Study of problems and attitudes concer- 
ning aging and death. 

462. Psychological Measurement. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: PSY 110 and 360. Theory, 
problems and techniques of psychological measurement. 

492. Special Problems in Psychology. 1-6 hrs. Prerequisites: PSY 320 and consent 
of instructor. 

493. Field Experience in Psychology. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisites: Twenty-four hours of 
psychology and permission of the instructor and department chairman. Opportunity for 
the student to observe and participate under supervision in the activities of one or several 
agencies providing psychological services. 

495. Special Problems. 6 hrs. State Internship. 

498. Senior Thesis. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman and in- 
structor. 

RADIO-TELEVISION-FILM (RTF— 220) 

200. Survey of Mass Communication. 3 hrs. 

270. Film History and Criticism (1895-1945). 3 hrs. 

271 . Introduction to Film Production. 3 hrs. 

302. Broadcast Journalism. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: JOU 102 and completion of English 
requirements in core curriculum. 

303. Internship in Radio, Television, and Film. 3 9 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 

310. Radio Laboratory. 1 hr. 

311. Radio Production. 3 hrs. 

320. Announcing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: RTF 311. 
330. Broadcast Advertising. 3 hrs. 
340. Introduction to TV Production. 3 hrs. 
360. Broadcast Rules and Regulations. 3 hrs. 

370. Contemporary Cinema. 3 hrs. 

371. Basic Cinematography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: RTF 271. 

375. Film Editing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: RTF 371 or consent of instructor. 
377. Film Production Workshop. 3 hrs. 

407. Theories of Mass Communication. 3 hrs. 

411. Advanced Audio Production. 3 hrs. 

416. Radio Station Management. 3 hrs. 

417. Radio Production Workshop. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: RTF 311. 

418. Practicum in RTF Field. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
425. Audience Analysis. 3 hrs. 



328/Course Descriptions 

431. Advertising Management and Sales. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: RTF 330. 

440. Advanced Television Production. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: RTF 340. 

442. Writing for Radio-TV. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: RTF 340. 

447. Television Production Workshop. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: RTF 440. 

448. Seminar in Radio-TV. 3 hrs. 
460. Issues in Broadcasting. 3 hrs. 

471. Advanced Cinematography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: RTF 371 and consent of in- 
structor. 

472. Writing for Television and Film. 3 hrs. 

474. Techniques in Film Acting and Directing. 3 hrs. 

477. Advanced Film Production Workshop. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instruc- 



tor. 



478. Seminar in Film. 3 hrs. 



492. Special Problems in Radio, Television, and Film. 1-3 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. 

REAL ESTATE AJSD INSURANCE (REI— 617) 

300. Real Estate License Review. 3 hrs. Review to pass state real estate sales and 
broker examinations. Not acceptable for real estate and insurance major requirements. 

310. Land Resource Principles. 3 hrs. An introduction to the economics of land 
resources. 

325. General Insurance. 3 hrs. Nature of risk, its measurement, and the insurance 
mechanism as a device for handling risk with reference to the principal types of coverage. 

326. Introduction to Actuarial Science. 3 hrs. Compound interest theory, its applica- 
tion, and basic actuarial techniques of premium and reserve determination for life in- 
surance and annuities. 

330. Real Estate Principles. 3 hrs. An introduction to the field of real estate covering 
principles of law, valuation, management, financing, and brokerage of real estate. 

334. Residential Valuation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: REI 310 or 330. An introduction to 
the theory and practice of residential real estate valuation. 

340. Real Estate Law. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GBA 295. The law of real property and 
the law of real estate brokerage. 

345. Property Management. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: REI 330. The economics of loca- 
tion, finance, marketing, and law as it relates to property management. 

425. Life Insurance. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: REI 325. Types of policies and their uses; 
contract provisions; actuarial and legal aspects; settlement options. 

432. Real Estate Finance. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: REI 330. A study of the sources of real 
estate funds and analytical techniques for investment decision making. 

434. Income Property Valuation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: REI 330. Emphasis on the in- 
come approaches to real estate valuation. 

445. Property and Liability Insurance. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: REI 325. Fire, conse- 
quential loss, theft, automobile, general liability, and workmen's compensation insurance. 

450. Health Insurance. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: REI 325. Disability risk with its 
economic consequences and the various health insurance coverages available to meet it. 

460. Real Estate Development. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: REI 310 or 330. An analysis of 
real estate development in the private sector. 



Recreation/329 



RECREATION (REC— 735) 



Service Activity Courses— The following are activity courses offered on a grade or 
pass-fail basis and REC 180 through 187 will fulfill the physical education University re- 
quirements. 

180. Skeet and Trap Shooting. 1 hr. 

182. Marksmanship Instructors Course. 1 hr. 

183. Pioneering. 1 hr. 

184. Canoeing. 1 hr. 

185. Family Camping. 1 hr. 

186. Freshwater Fishing. 1 hr.- . 

187. Saltwater Fishing. 1 hr. 

188. Hobbycraft. 1 hr. 

189. Naturecraft. 1 hr. 

Career Courses — The. following are career courses offered to meet requirements for a 
major in recreation leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. 

200. Man's Search for Leisure. 3 hrs. A study of the evolution of leisure and lesiure 
service programs. 

203. The Literature of Recreation. 3 hrs. A course to introduce recreation majors to 
the various areas of specialization. 

210. Practicum in Recreation I. 1 hr. Initial field experience in area of specialization. 

211. Practicum in Recreation II. 1 hr. Observational experiences in areas of 
specialization. 

212. Practicum in Recreation III. 1 hr. Practical field experiences as aide in area of 
specialization. 

300. Recreational Scuba. 2 hrs. Provide competent diving instruction to meet in- 
creased demand for aquatic recreation. 

301. Adventure Training. 2 hrs. To develop student proficiency in land and water 
navigation, marksmanship, and survival techniques. 

322. Theory of Recreation Programming. 3 hrs. Procedures and methods involved in 
planning and organizing a comprehensive recreation program. 

323. Theory of Recreation Leadership. 3 hrs. Methods, techniques, and materials for 
directing individuals in group activities. 

341. Camper Counseling, Administration, and Operation. 3 hrs. Objectives, ac- 
tivities, methods, administrative and operational policies of organized camps. 

342. Outdoor Recreation. 3 hrs. The recreational use of outdoors, with emphasis on 
education, emerging trends and problems. 

350. Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation. 3 hrs. Introduction to theory, practice, 
philosophy and role of TR in community and institutions. 

402. Seminar in Recreation. 1 hr. A seminar course designed to examine pertinent 
issues and current practices in recreation. 

403. Field Work in Recreation. 9 hrs. Internship under the direct supervision of a 
field professional. 

410. Physical Education and Recreation for the Educationally Disabled and Other 
Behavioral Disorders. 3 hrs. The development of concepts and knowledge of physical 
education and recreation programs for L.D., M.R. and E.D. 



330/Course Descriptions 

411. Physical Education and Recreation for the Crippled and Other Health Im- 
paired. 3 hrs. The development of concepts knowledge for programs for C.P. and P.H. 
individuals. 

412. Sports Programs for the Disabled. 3 hrs. Competitive sports programming and 
special techniques for preparing disabled individuals for participation. 

413. Organization and Administration of Public Recreation. 3 hrs. Designed to 
study the organization and administration of public recreation agencies and their policies. 

415. Business Procedures for Parks and Recreation. 3 hrs. A study of specific 
business procedures and administrative policies. 

417. Park Management and Operation. 3 hrs. The operational techniques and 
managerial principles of efficient administration. 

422. Youth Service Programs. 3 hrs. The responsibilities, relationships, organiza- 
tion, administration, and activities of youth agencies. 

424. Community Playgrounds Programs and Operation. 3 hrs. The administration, 
programs, and operation of playgrounds and community centers. 

426. Community-School Recreation. 3 hrs. A comprehensive overview of communi- 
ty recreation with emphasis on inter-relationships of public schools. 

432. Environmental Aspects of Recreation. 3 hrs. The interrelationships between 
recreational and available resources. 

434. Park Development and Design. 3 hrs. The application of design and planning 
concepts to outdoor recreation areas and facilities. 

436. Park and Recreation Planning. 3 hrs. Fundamental principles and 
methodologies dealing with proper identification, allocation, and use of resources. 

441. Resources Management and Policy. 3 hrs. The techniques, procedures, and 
policies affecting management of natural resources. 

443. Outdoor Education. 3 hrs. A study of outdoor education, specifically its 
philosophy, programs, methods, and resources. Organization, programming, and con- 
ducting of programs and activities in institutions. 

447. Interpretation of Cultural and Natural Resources. 3 hrs. The interpretive pro- 
cess as applied to natural and cultural resources. 

451. Theraputic Recreation Programming. 3 hrs. The organization, programming, 
and conducting of programs and activities in institutions. 

452. Gerontology and Recreation for Later Years. 3 hrs. The aging process and 
special needs, problems, opportunities, and activities of older people. 

490. Physical Education for the Handicapped. 3 hrs. Theoretical aspects and prac- 
tical applications of physical education and recreation for the handicapped. 

491. Recreation Education for Teachers. 3 hrs. Programs and benefits of recreation 
and leisure to motivate leaders who serve in educating individuals. 

492. Outdoor Recreation Seminar. 3 hrs. A practical and philosophical introduction 
to the use of outdoors. 

494. Field Problems. 1-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman. 
Practical experiences dealing with problem situations in the field. 

RELIGION (REL— 288) 

ANT 316. Biblical Archeology. May also be offered for credit as a religion course. 

ANT 412. Mythology and Folklore. May also be offered for credit as a religion 
course. 

ANT 434. Primitive Religion. May also be offered for credit as a religion course. 



Science Education/331 

131. Introduction to Religion. 3 hrs. The study of religion as an aspect of human 
culture with attention to both Christian and non-Christian religions. 

330. Religion in Society. 3 hrs. A study of religion in society and its interaction with 
and relation to other social values. 

333. The Jewish Tradition. 3 hrs. A study of the major themes and history of the 
Jewish religion. 

335. The Christian Tradition. 3 hrs. A study of the major themes and history of the 
Christian religion. 

435. Religions of the Near East. 3 hrs. A survey of Judaism, Islam, and 
Zoroastrianism. 

436. Mysticism. 3 hrs. A study of the major themes and issues of religious 
mysticism— East and West. 

490. Contemporary Religious Problems. 3 hrs. An examination of specific problems 
within the broad spectrum of contemporary religious concern. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 

RESEARCH AND FOUNDATIONS (REF— 125) 

(Educational Foundations) 

336. Principles of Guidance. 3 hrs. Deals with the fundamental philosophy, 
methods, and organization of guidance services in the public schools. 

400. Public Education in the United States. 3 hrs. An orientation to teaching as a 
profession. To be taken the last semester of the sophomore year. 

416. Audiovisual Education. 3 hrs. A general course for teachers with emphasis 
upon use, production and selection of sound and visual classroom media. 

421. Seminar for Teaching Interns. 9 hrs. Open to inter-teachers only. 

430. Teaching in the Space Age. 1-3 hrs. A study of the influence of aerospace 
developments on society. 

436. Designing Educational Systems for Individualized Instruction. 3 hrs. Em- 
phasizes systems approach to individualizing instruction. Designed for teachers and library- 
media personnel. 

469. Tests and Measurements. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: EPY 370, 372, or 374, and senior 
standing. Considers evaluative practices in education. 

490. Classroom Use of Instructional Television. 3 hrs. Planning, organizing, presen- 
tation, and use of instructional television. Emphasis on Mississippi's state program. 

494. Field Problems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of department chairman. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION (SCE— 380) 

432. Science for Elementary Teachers. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: FS 131, 132, 133, 134, or 
12 semester hours of science. 

435. Marine Science for Elementary Teachers. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

441. Methods of Teaching the Metric System. 3 hrs. Lectures and exercises in 
measurements using the International System of Units. 

453. Earth and Environmental Science for Intermediate School Teachers. 3 hrs. Pre- 
requisite: Earth and environmental science background or permission of the instructor. 

454. Biological Sciences for Intermediate School Teachers. 3 hrs. An examination of 
subject matter, techniques, and methods for teaching the life sciences. 

455. Physical Science for Intermediate School Teachers. 3 hrs. An examination of 
the subject matter, techniques, and methods for teaching. 



332/Course Descriptions 

456. Techniques in Marine Science Education. 3 hrs. Marine resources of Mississip- 
pi. 

457. Marine Science for Teachers. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: SCE 456 or permission. Ad- 
vanced topics in marine science. 

470. Biology for Secondary Teachers. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
An examination of the techniques and methods for teaching biology. 

471. Chemistry for Secondary Teachers. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instruc- 
tor. Designed to familiarize teachers with materials, methods, and techniques. 

472. Physics for Secondary Teachers. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
A course to familiarize teachers with content, methods, materials, and techniques. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. arr. A problem study to be approved by the depart- 
ment chairman. 

SOCIOLOGY (SOC— 292) 

Note: All 400 level courses are open to students of junior standing or higher. 

101. Introduction to Sociology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite to all other sociology courses. 
Designed to give a general overview of the perspective, concepts, and methodology of 
sociology. (JC 21 13) 

230. Introduction to Social Work. 3 hrs. An introduction to the purpose, methods, 
and philosophy of contemporary social work. Open to persons in other disciplines. (JC 
1143,2163) 

240. Social Problems. 3 hrs. A study of representative contemporary problems, with 
emphasis on causes which arise from cultural patterns and social change. (JC 2123, 2133) 

300. Social Organization. 3 hrs. The structure and functioning of social groups, 
organizations and institutions including process of cooperation, conflict and change. 

310. Urban Sociology. 3 hrs. An analysis of the nature of urban society and the fac- 
tors shaping it, including the influence of urban ecology and ecological processes. 

311. Rural Sociology. 3 hrs. A study of the structure, institutions, and social pro- 
cesses of rural society; and of the effect of urbanization on rural society. 

314. The Family. 3 hrs. An analysis of the structure and functions of the family as an 
institution and the factors making for family change. 

330. Methods of Social Case Work. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: SOC 230. A study of the 
principles of social case work. 

331. Methods of Social Work II. 3 hrs. A study of techniques and methods of carry- 
ing out practice in group and community settings. 

340. Social Control and Deviance. 3 hrs. 

341. Criminology. 3 hrs. A study of causes, treatment, and prevention of crime. 
Deals with criminology, penology, and criminal legislation. 

350. Sociology of Minorities. 3 hrs. An analysis of socio-cultural factors in minority- 
majority relationships and their social and psychic implications. 

355. Collective Behavior and Social Movements. 3 hrs. A study of the ways in which 
collective behavior and social movements relate to socio-cultural change. 

421. Special Sociological Topics. 3 hrs. Variable content. May be repeated three 
times in separate topical offerings. 

424. Gerontology. 3 hrs. The social significance of age and aging through childhood, 
adolescence, maturity, and old age. 

426. Sociology of Education. 3 hrs. A comprehensive study of the educational in- 
stitution, its relationship to the community and society. 



Special Education/333 

433. Field Work Practicum. 3-9 hrs. arr. Designed to provide the student with prac- 
tical field experiences in a career-oriented area. 

444. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 hrs. A study of causes and the nature of juvenile delin- 
quency, the development of the juvenile court, probation, and other rehabilitative pro- 
grams. 

450. Social Foundations of Personality. 3 hrs. A treatment of the role of the social 
group and the cultural heritage in the development and functioning of the human personali- 
ty. 

460. Methods of Social Research. 3 hrs. A survey of elementary research techniques 
used in empirical social investigations. 

461. Population. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: SOC 460. An introduction to demography, 
analyzing significant changes in population composition. 

462. Methods of Social Research II. 3 hrs. Research designs, types of research, 
methods of observation and data collection, specialized techniques. 

471. Social Institutions. 3 hrs. A detailed study of major American social institu- 
tions, their functions, interrelationships, and significant trends. 

480. Advanced General Sociology. 3 hrs. An advanced course in general sociology 
giving expanded treatment to the basic sociological concepts and subject-matter areas. 

481 . History of Social Thought. 3 hrs. An examination of early social thought, trac- 
ing the development of western thought and ideas from Hammurabi to Comte. 

482. Sociological Theory. 3 hrs. A survey of the growth and development of 
sociological theory from Comte to the present. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. To be used to pursue specialized interests for which 
courses are not offered. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION (SPE— 190) 

200. Practicum in Special Education. 1 hr. Observational methods with the han- 
dicapped. To be taken with SPE 400 or by special arrangement. 

201. Practicum in Special Education. 1 hr. Teacher aide work with severely involved 
handicapped. To be taken with SPE 401 . 

202. Practicum in Special Education. 1 hr. Mini lessons and teacher aide work with 
the handicapped. To be taken with SPE 432 (early childhood) or SPE 434 (secon- 
dary/adult). 

310. Student Teaching: Observation 1 hr. First clinical and student teaching ex- 
perienoe for speech correction majors. 

311. Student Teaching: Screening. 1 hr. Clinical work in assessing children in speech 
and audiology. 

312. Student Teaching: Clinical Practice. 1-7 hrs. 

400. The Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child. 3 hrs. An introduction 
to exceptional populations and procedures and policies relating to their education and 
citizenship. 

401. Methods and Materials for the Multiply, Profoundly and Severely Handicap- 
ped. 3 hrs. Program and curricula development for children with severe learning problems 
to include the retarded, deaf-blind, and physical-medical deficiencies. 

402. General Methods in Special Education. 3 hrs. The development of conceptual 
and writing skills associated with individual educational programs for the handicapped, 
materials, and media techniques. 

403. Educational Evaluation of Exceptional Children. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: REF 469. 
Basic principles underlying measurement and evaluation in education with emphasis on in- 
terpretation as it relates to exceptional children. 



334/Course Descriptions 

410. Methods in Speech Correction. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: SHS 201, 202, 211, 221, 
411, and SHS majors. A course designed to acquaint the speech and hearning major with 
clinical conditions as found in public schools. 

411. Language Development for the Handicapped. 3 hrs. An introduction to 
language processes and common deficits related to the handicapped. 

420. Structure and Function of the Eye. 3 hrs. Indentification, function, and care of 
the eye as it relates to the visually handicapped. 

421. Methods and Materials in Teaching Visually Handicapped. 3 hrs. A study of 
practices commonly used in education programs, including Braille, space orientation, 
special materials, and organizations. 

422. Braille. 3 hrs. A skill course in communication through Type 2 Braille. 

423. Teaching of Braille. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: SPE 422 or equivalent. Developing 
methods for teaching Braille to visually handicapped to include reading, mathematics, and 
production abilities. 

424. Mobility Training for the Visually Handicapped. 3 hrs. An introduction to 
mobility, movement, and spatial awareness for the visually handicapped. 

425. Psychology and Education of the Visually Handicapped. 3 hrs. A study of 
social-emotional and cognitive learning factors of the visually handicapped. 

427. Physically Handicapped and Other Health Impaired. 3 hrs. A study of major 
handicapping conditions associated with physical and health impairments and their educa- 
tional implications. 

428. Methods for Teaching the Physically Handicapped and Other Health 
Impaired. 3 hrs. Educational programs, counseling techniques, and least restrictive alter- 
native placements for the physically handicapped. 

429. Curriculum and Mobility Training for the Physically Handicapped. 3 

hrs. General curricula development and specific demonstration and simulations in mobility 
training. 

430. Learning Disabilities. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: SPE 400 or permission. A study of 
social, emotional, physical, and learning characteristics of specific learning disabilities. 

431. Individual Programming for Educationally Handicapped: Pre-academic 
Levels. 3 hrs. Methods and materials and individual educational planning for pre- 
academic level retarded, specific learning disabled and mildly emotionally disturbed. 

432. Individual Programming for Educationally Handicapped: Elementary Levels. 3 

hrs. Methods and materials and individual educational planning for elementary level 
retarded, specific learning disabled and mildly emotionally disturbed. 

433. Individual Programming for Educationally Handicapped: Secondary and Adult 
Levels. 3 hrs. Methods and materials and Individual educational planning for secondary 
retardation, specific learning disabilities, and mild emotionally disturbed. 

440. Mental Retardation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: SPE 400 or permission. A study of 
social, emotional, physical, and intellectual characteristics of the mentally retarded. 

450. Introduction to Behavioral Disorders. 3 hrs. A basic study of personality and 
social deviations commonly found with school age pupils to include etiologies, program- 
ming, and service delivery units. 

451. Behavioral Management: Handicapped. 3 hrs. Methods of affective develop- 
ment, control, and resources in behavioral problems with the handicapped. 

465. Characteristics of the Gifted and Talented. 3 hrs. Study of gifted populations to 
include characteristics, learning modes, and assessment procedures. 

466. Basic Methods and Materials in Gifted/Talented Education. 3 hrs. Curricula 
building activities for teachers in programs for the gifted. 



Speech and Hearing Sciences/335 

470. Organizational Procedures in Special Education. 3 hrs. Study of alternative 
modes in educating handicapped, legal aspects, and administrative policies and processes. 

481. Student Teaching: Educationally Handicapped. 9 hrs. 

482. Student Teaching: Visually Handicapped. 9 hrs. 

483. Student Teaching: Physically Handicapped. 9 hrs. 

484. Student Teaching: Gifted and Talented. 9 hrs. 
486. Student Teaching: Hearing Impaired. 3 hrs. 

489. Seminar in Special Education of Student Teaching. 6 hrs. In-service student 
teaching designed for experienced teachers who have demonstrated their interest and ability 
as classroom teachers. 

490. Workshop in Special Education. 3 hrs. 

492. Special Problems in Special Education. 1-3 hrs. A consideration of special in- 
terest areas in the field of exceptional children. 

SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCES (SHS— 296) 
101. Orientation to Speech and Hearing Sciences. 1 hr. 

201. Phonetics. 3 hrs. 

202. Fundamentals of Speech and Hearing Science. 3 hrs. 
211. Introduction to Communication Disorders. 3 hrs. 
221. Introduction to Audiology. 3 hrs. 

401 . Language and Speech Development. 3 hrs. 

402. Anatomy and Physiology of the Hearing Mechanism. 3 hrs. 

403. Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism. 3 hrs. 

411. Articulation Disorders. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: SHS 201, 211. 

412. Diagnostic Procedures in Speech Pathology I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: SHS 211, 
411. 

413. Voice Disorders. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: SHS 21 1,403. 

414. Stuttering and Related Problems. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: SHS 211. 

415. Speech and Language Disorders of the Cerebral Palsied. 3 hrs. Prerequi- 
sites: SHS 21 1,403. 

416. Adult Aphasia and Related Problems. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: SHS 21 1,403. 

417. Speech and Language Disorders Related to Cleft Palate. 3 hrs. Prerequi- 
sites: SHS 21 1,403. 

418. Advanced Clinical Methods. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

419. Organic Disorders of Speech. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: SHS 202, 403, 41 1. 

420. Middle Ear Measurement. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: SHS 221, 402. 

421. Aural Rehabilitation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: SHS 221. 

422. Diagnostic/Prescriptive Teaching of the Hearing Impaired. 3 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: Senior standing or permission of instructor. 

423. Basic Sign Language. 2 hrs. For non-Education of the Deaf majors. 

424. Methods of Communicating with the Hearing Impaired. 3 hrs. For Education 
of the Deaf majors only. May be repeated once for credit. 

425. Psycho-Social Factors Associated with Hearing Impairment. 3 hrs. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. 



336/Course Descriptions 

426. Secondary School Methods and Curriculum for Hearing Impaired Children. 3 

hrs. Prerequisites: SHS433, SHS438. 

427. Anatomy, Physiology and Research in Speech, Hearing and Language for the 
Hearing Impaired. 

428. Clinical Audiology I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: SHS221. 

431. Language Disorders I: Assessment of Children with Language Disorders. 3 

hrs. Prerequisite: SHS401. 

432. Language Disorders II: Hahilitation of the Aphasic Child. 3 hrs. Prerequi- 
sites: SHS401. 

433. Developing Language Skills with the Hearing Impaired. 3 hrs. 

434. Learning Strategies for the Multi-Handicapped Hearing Impaired Child. 3 

hrs. Prerequisites: EPY 374, SPE 400, SHS 433, 437 or permission of instructor. 

435. Developing Oral-Aural Communication in Hearing Impaired Children. 3 hrs. 

436. Developing Reading in the Hearing Impaired. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: SHS 433 or 
consent of instructor. 

437. Introduction to Education of the Hearing Impaired. 3 hrs. 

438. Problems in Academic Subjects for the Hard-of-Hearing and Deaf. 3 hrs. 

439. Education of Preschool Hearing Impaired Children. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: SHS 
221. Practicum required. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION (SCM— 216) 

100. Human Communication. 3 hrs. An overview of the field of human communica- 
tion, including interpersonal, small group, organizational, and mass communication. 

111. Oral Communication. 3 hrs. Communication principles and practice in the 
preparation and develivery of public speeches. (JC 1113) 

112. Argumentation and Debate. 3 hrs. Theory and practice in inquiry and advocacy 
involving analysis, reasoning, organization and presentation of arguments for decision 
making. (JC 1123,2133) 

210. Voice and Diction. 3 hrs. Instruction in phonetics, the relationship between 
speech and social roles, and the development of a standard English dialect. May be taken in 
concert with SCM 300-L Oral Language Laboratory. (JC 1 153) 

300-L. Oral Language Laboratory. 1-3 hrs. arr. An oral language laboratory to help 
students develop effective, standard English speech. Includes individual speech analysis 
and voice and diction pattern practice. Not to be counted as satisfying the Liberal Arts 
core. May be taken in concert with SCM 210 Voice and Diction. 

305. Interpersonal Communication. 3 hrs. An experiential course designed to im- 
prove students' competence in and understanding of interpersonal relationships. 

310. Forensics. 1 hr. May be repeated for three hours credit. For participation in In- 
quiry and Advocacy, USM's public debate program. 

311. Persuasion. 3 hrs. Study of classical and contemporary theories and strategies 
of persuasion with applications to human relations, advertising, and public relations. 

312. Interviewing Principles and Applications. 3 hrs. 

315. Advanced Public Address. 3 hrs. 

320. Business and Professional Speaking. 3 hrs. A course to develop student skills in 
a broad group of special communication skills pertinent to the world of work, e.g., running 
meetings, making technical reports, and group problem solving. 



Theatre Arts/337 

330. Small Croup Communication. 3 hrs. Provides students with the basic skills and 
principles of communication pertinent to the small problem-solving group. 

350. Nonverbal Communication. 3 hrs. An examination of the varieties of nonverbal 
communication and their role as context for speech communication. 

403. Political Communication. 3 hrs. A comprehensive study of the role of com- 
munication in political campaigns and in the general political process. 

410. Organizational Communication. 3 hrs. Analysis of communication purposes, 
needs, systems, and effects, emphasizing facilitation of task interdependencies and utiliza- 
tion of human resources. 

411. Managing the Forensics Program. 3 hrs. 

412. Coaching Debate. 3 hrs. 

417. Practicum. 3 hrs. May be repeated twice. 

450. Seminar in Speech Communication. 3 hrs. An examination of various theories 
of speech communication and various settings for their application. 

492. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 

THEATRE ARTS (THE— 685) 
103. Introduction to Theatre. 3 hrs. (JC-SPT-1213) 

105. Beginning Tap. 2 hrs. Developing an understanding and practice of movement 
skills basic to tap dance of America. May be repeated twice for a total of six hours. 

106. Beginning Jazz. 2 hrs. The study and application of the basic skills of jazz 
dance. May be repeated twice for a total of six hours. 

111. Fundamentals of Oral Interpretation. 3 hrs. General educational approach to 
the art as a means of communicating literary content. (JC-SPT-2143) 

115. Voice for the Actor I. 2 hrs. Vocal methods and techniques for use in the 
theatre. 

120. Fundamentals of Acting. 3 hrs. (JC-SPT-1233) 

125. Movement for the Actor. 2 hrs. 

150. Beginning Modern Dance. 2 hrs. Discussion and practice of movement patterns, 
improvisation, and studies in modern dance for the non-major. May be repeated twice for a 
total of six hours. 

152. Modern Dance Techniques and Composition. 3 hrs. Discussion and practice of 
movement skills and studies in modern dance for the dance major. May be repeated for a 
total of six hours. 

200. Stagecraft. 3 hrs. Both study and practical application of the techniques of 
building and painting stage scenery and properties. (JC-SPT-2223) 

201. Introduction to Costume. 3 hrs. Costume theory and practical workshop pro- 
cedures. 

204. Stage Makeup. 2 hrs. 

215. Voice for the Actor II. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: THE 1 15. Continuation of THE 1 15 
plus introduction to stage dialects. 

240. Mime and Pantomine. 2 hrs. 

250. Beginning Ballet. 2 hrs. Discussion and practice of movements in ballet for the 
non-major. May be repeated twice for a total of six hours. 

252. Ballet Technique. 3 hrs. Discussion and practice of ballet skills for the dance 
major. May be repeated for a total of six hours. 



338/Course Descriptions 

253. Dance Improvisation. 2hrs. 

254. Music Analysis and Accompaniment for Dance. 2 hrs. 

258. Modern Dance Technique and Survey. 3 hrs. May be repeated for a total of six 
hours. 

259. Intermediate Dance Composition. 3 hrs. Exploration of the elements of dance 
applied to dance choreography. 

301. Reader's Theatre. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: THE 111. Theories and problems of 
presenting prose, poetry, and drama in group performances. 

306. Scene Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: THE 200 or consent of instructor. Elements 
of stage design. Play analysis in terms of visualization and style, and the mechanics of 
developing an effective stage setting. 

310. Intermediate Acting. 2 hrs. Continuation of THE 120. 

315. Voice for the Actor III. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: THE 1 15 and THE 215 or permis- 
sion from instructor. Vocal techniques for the singing actor. 

320. Directing. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: THE 120 and 200. 

330. University Theatre. 1 hr. Participation in the major theatrical productions of 
the department. May be repeated for a total of four hours. 

331. University Theatre. 1 hr. A continuation of THE 330. May be repeated for a 
total of four hours. 

341. Opera Workshop. 1 hr. A complete stage production of scenes and major pro- 
ductions from the Music Theatre repertoire. 

342. Opera Workshop. 1 hr. A continuation of THE 341. 

350. Tap Dance for the Dance Major. 2 hrs. Study of the various styles of tap in- 
cluding rhythm, jazz, and ballet forms. May be repeated twice for a total of six hours. 

352. Ballet Technique. 3 hrs. Continuation and further enrichment of the technique 
of ballet at the intermediate level for the dance major. May be repeated for a total of six 
hours. 

353. Character Dance. 2 hrs. Introduction to the study of European dance forms as 
used for theatrical presentations. 

354. Dance Production. 1 hr. Developing an awareness and application of behind the 
stage skills in costume, lights, scenery, and theatre plant. May be repeated up to five times. 

358. Dance Technique and Theory. 3 hrs. May be repeated for a total of six hours. 

359. Advanced Dance Composition. 3 hrs. 

361 . Stage Combat. 2 hrs. Using fundamental techniques of fighting with or without 
weapons to create the illusion of combat for the stage. May be repeated one time. 

362. Movement Notation. 2 hrs. Introduction to Sutton Movement Shorthand. 
Beginning reading and writing. First of a two semester sequence of instruction. 

363. Movement Notation. 2 hrs. Continuation of THE 362. 
401. Costume Design. 3 hrs. 

410. Stage Sound Engineering. 2 hrs. Principles and practice in stage sound engineer- 
ing. 

41 1. Advanced Oral Interpretation. 2 hrs. Special problems related to the oral inter- 
pretation of poetry and prose. 

412. Stage Lighting. 3 hrs. Theory and application of general and special lighting, 
color, instrumentation, and control. 

414. Creative Dramatics. 3 hrs. Fundamentals of organizing and developing creative 
dramatics activities for preschool and elementary age school children. 



Theatre Arts/339 

415. Fundamentals of Children's Theatre. 3 hrs. Methods and techniques of produc- 
ing plays for elementary school age children. 

417. Advanced Acting. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: THE 120, 125, 310. 

420. Advanced Directing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: THE 320. 

427. Theatre History I. 3 hrs. 

428. Theatre History II. 3 hrs. A continuation of THE 427. 

430. Summer Theatre I. 3 hrs. Concentrated applied theatre. 

431. Summer Theatre II. 3 hrs. A continuation of THE 430. 

435. Advanced Scene Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: THE 306 or consent of instructor. 
The techniques of scene design as applied to non-realistic stage settings. 

440. Ballet Technique. 3 hrs. Continuation and further enrichment of the technique 
of ballet for the dance major. May be repeated for a total of six hours. 

445. Advanced Stage Lighting. 3 hrs. 

447. Opera Workshop. 1 hr. A continuation of THE 342. 

448. Opera Workshop. 1 hr. A continuation of THE 447. 

453. Jazz Dance for the Dance Major. 2 hrs. The study and application of the prin- 
ciples of jazz movement. May be repeated twice for a total of six hours. 

455. Dance Repertory. 1 hr. May be repeated for a total of six hours. 

458. Dance Technique and Analysis. 3 hrs. May be repeated for a total of nine hours. 

459. Musical Theatre Production. 3 hrs. Study of the different froms and styles of 
Musical Theatre with special attention to the various elements of production. 

460. Costume Design Studio. 3 hrs. Projects in designing costumes for plays, opera, 
and dance. Emphasis placed on costume designs as an element in a total production con- 
cept. 

461. Advanced Theatrical Makeup. 3 hrs. Projects in makeup design and execution. 
Emphasis placed on three-dimensional makeup techniques for theatre, television, and film. 

462. Dance History I. 3 hrs. 

463. Dance History II. 3 hrs. 

464. Methods of Teaching Dance. 3 hrs. A study of the philosophy, principles, and 
objectives of teaching dance. Includes observation and supervised teaching experiences. 

465. Music Resources for Dance. 2 hrs. Studying and gathering of music resources 
for dance. 

466. Methods of Dance Lecture and Demonstration. 3 hrs. Methods of preparing 
dance lecture-demonstrations and tours. 

467. Dance Curriculum and Organization Methods. 3 hrs. Study of dance cur- 
riculum design and organization. 

468. Musical Theatre Dance. 2 hrs. 

470. Senior Dance Production. 3 hrs. 

471. Performance Internship. 3 hrs. Professional experience in residence with ap- 
proved professional organizations. 

480. Directing Children's Theatre. 3 hrs. The techniques of directing, organizing, 
and administering a children's theatre program. 

481. Repertory Theatre. 9 hrs. Participation in the analysis and preparation of the 
performances of three plays in repertory. 



340/Course Descriptions 

490. Theatre Workshop. 3 hrs. Designed for the non-theatre major (i.e., English, 
speech, music, etc.) who is responsible for directing school or community drama activities. 

492. Problems in Theatre. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. May be 
repeated for a total of four hours. 

THERAPY (THY— 740) 

411. Seminar in Corrective Therapy. 1 hr. An introductory seminar for students in- 
terested in careers in Corrective Therapy. 

421. Clinical Experience. 1-4 hrs. arr. A supervised internship in various habilita- 
tion, rehabilitation, or neuropsychiatric clinics. May be repeated. 

454. Neurological and Pathological Concepts and Implications in Human 
Functions. 3 hrs. A review of the central nervous system and pathology as related to 
muscular control and disease that limit normal human functioning. 

461. Corrective Therapy and Rehabilitation Medicine. 2 hrs. An introduction to the 
basic concepts and considerations necessary for effective functioning in the clinical setting. 

462. Spinal Cord Injuries and Muscle Disorders. 2 hrs. A review of normal and ab- 
normal functioning of the motor pathways with emphasis on evaluation and rehabilitation 
of specific motor disorders and spinal cord injuries. 

463. Normal Human Locomotion. 2 hrs. An indepth analysis of normal human 
locomotion and its impact on ambulation training, prosthesis gait deviations, and blind 
mobility training. 

464. Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders. 

471. Accelerated Corrective Therapy Rehabilitation Ward Program. 2 hrs. An in- 
troduction to the basic concepts and treatment procedures used in accelerated rehabilitation 
ward programs. 

472. Dynamics of Psychiatric Group Rehabilitation Programs. 2 hrs. The complex- 
ities in directing neuropsychiatric group activities. 

473. Neuro-Psychiatric Geriatric Training. 2 hrs. An introduction to the multi- 
problem areas of communication with motivating and treating the geriatric, neuro- 
psychiatric patient. 

474. Programs for the Severly Disturbed Psychiatric Patient. 2 hrs. An introduction 
to the problems of treating the psychiatric patient in a locked ward setting. 






FACULTY EMERITI 

DR. HOWARD WILSON BAHR, Professor Emeritus of English 

MISS MABLE MAE BALDWIN, Associate Professor Emerita of 

Business Education 

DR. JAMES EDWARD BAXTER, Associate Professor Emeritus of 

Education 

MRS. MARY POE BAYLIS, Associate Professor Emerita of Music 

MISS FRANCES ELIZABETH BENNER, Associate Professor 

Emerita of Music 

DR. HERMAN BOROUGHS, Professor Emeritus of Counseling Psychology 

and Counselor Education 
DR. LOUIS KOHL BRANDT, Professor Emeritus of Finance and General 

Business 
DR. JULIUS CHRISTIAN BRAUN, Professor Emeritus of Educational 

Administration and Supervision 

DR. BAHNGRELL WALTER BROWN, Professor Emeritus of Geology 

DR. MARICE COLLINS BROWN, Distinguished University Professor Emerita of 

English 

DR. ZED HOUSTON BURNS, Professor Emeritus of Psychology 

DR. CLAUDE LOUIS CAMPBELL, Associate Professor Emeritus of 

Curriculum and Instruction 

MISS PEARL CAMPBELL, Associate Professor Emerita of Home 

Economics 

DR. JOSEPH O'HARA CARSON, JR., Professor Emeritus of 

Educational Administration and Supervision 

DR. JAMES TREADWELL DAVIS, Professor Emeritus of History 

DR. LENA YOUNG de GRUMMOND, Professor Emerita of Library 

Science 

MISS ANNIE LOUISE D'OLIVE, Assistant Professor Emerita of Art 

MRS. LOIS ARENDER DRAIN, Assistant Professor Emerita of 

Home Economics Education 

DR. HENRY BENJAMIN EASTERLING, Professor Emeritus of 

Research and Human Development 

MR. MASON LEON EUBANKS, Assistant Professor Emeritus of English 

MISS WILLIE EVELYN EWELL, Assistant Professor Emerita of 

Business Education 

DR. VIRGINIA ISABELLE FELDER, Professor Emerita of Mathematics 

MISS MADELINE VIRGINIA FLYNT, Assistant Professor Emerita of 

Library Science 

DR. DAVID BARON FOLTZ, Distinguished University Professor 

Emeritus of Music 

MRS. KATHERINE SELBY FOOTE, Associate Professor Emerita of Mathematics. 

DR. BERTHA MAUDE FRITZSCHE, Dean Emerita of the School of 

Home Economics 

DR. ALBERT DONALD GEORGE, Professor Emeritus of Speech Communication 

MRS. MARY MIXON HARMON, Instructor Emerita of Foreign Languages 



342/Faculty 



DR. GILBERT FREDERICK HARTWIG, Professor Emeritus of Theatre Arts 
MRS. FERN ROGERS HESSON, Assistant Professor Emerita of Institution 

Administration 
MR. M. ROY HOOD, Instructor Emeritus of Curriculum and Instruction 
MR. GEORGE GIBSON HURST, Assistant Professor Emeritus of Science 

Education 
MISS WILLERY HARRIETTE JACKSON, Associate Professor Emerita 

of History 

MRS. NETTA McKEITHEN JENKINS, Assistant Professor Emerita of 

Latin American Studies 

DR. MORRIS RAY KARNES, Professor Emeritus of Educational 

Administration and Supervision 

DR. NORVIN LAWRENCE LANDSKOV, Professor Emeritus of Curriculum 

and Instruction 
DR. CHARLES ELMER LANE, JR., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

DR. JAMES SCOTT LONG, Research Professor Emeritus 

DR. WILLIAM DAVID McCAIN, President Emeritus of the University 

DR. CLARENCE EDWARD McCARVER, Professor Emeritus of Health 

MR. LAURENCE HEIDELBERG McDUFF, Assistant Professor Emeritus of 

Accounting 
MRS. SALLIE STEVENS McLEMORE, Assistant Professor Emerita of 

Education 

MR. SERVANDO LORENZO MENENDEZ, Librarian II Emeritus 

DR. JESSE LLOYD MILAM, Professor Emeritus of Physical Education 

DR. LEO REYNOLDS MILLER, Professor Emeritus of 

Curriculum and Instruction 

DR. RAY SIGLER MUSGRAVE, Distinguished University Professor 

Emeritus of Psychology 

DR. JOHN FREDERICK NAU, Distinguished University Professor 

Emeritus of Philosophy and Religion 

MR. KARL NEUMANN, Professor Emeritus of Music 

DR. GEORGE WILSON NICHOLSON, Professor Emeritus of 

Mathematics 

MR. MARION ZYGMUNT NOWAKOWSKI, Associate Professor Emeritus 

of Music 
MISS FANNIE OZELL OWINGS, Assistant Professor Emerita of Home 

Economics 

DR. RALPH SEER OWINGS, Dean Emeritus 

of the Graduate School 

MISS CARRIE LOUISE PORTER, Instructor Emerita of English 

MISS FLORA MAE POSEY, Associate Professor Emerita of Nursing 

MISS FRANCES ELIZABETH RECK, Associate Professor Emerita of 

Business Education 

DR. LOUIS LEROY ROGERS, Professor Emeritus of Research 
and Human Development 



Faculty/343 



MR. GILBERT THEODORE SAETRE, Associate Professor Emeritus of 

Music Education 
MR. WILLIAM FEAGIN ST. CLAIR, Associate Professor Emeritus of 

Physics 

DR. JOHN RICHARD SHAFFER, Professor Emeritus of Research 

and Foundations 

MRS. MAUDE ANDERSON SMITH, Librarian II Emerita 

DR. LEONARD DON STOCKER, Professor Emeritus of Music 

MR. BENJAMIN ORMOND VAN HOOK, Professor Emeritus of 

Mathematics 

MISS ELIZABETH VARDAMAN, Librarian II Emerita 

MR. FERDINAND ARMIN VARRELMAN, Professor Emeritus of 

Biology 

DR. FRANK VIRDEN, Associate Professor Emeritus of Political Science 

DR. JAMES FREDERICK WALKER, Distinguished University 

Professor Emeritus of Biology 

DR. JESSIE STEWART WALL, Professor Emerita of Curriculum 

and Instruction 

MISS ALLIE MARGUERITE WEBB, Associate Professor Emerita of 

English 

DR. LEON AUSTIN WILBER, Distinguished University Professor 

Emeritus of Political Science 

MRS. ANNETTE BEDFORD WILDER, Librarian III Emerita 



GENERAL FACULTY 

LUCAS, AUBREY KEITH, President of the University and Professor of Educational 

Administration and Supervision. B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; 

Ph.D., Florida State University. 
ADAMS, CYNTHIA JANE McDONALD, Instructor of Nursing, Baccalaureate Pro- 
gram, B.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 
ADAMS, LARRY EDWARD, Assistant Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences. 

B.S., Henderson State University; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
ALBERS, LAWRENCE CHARLES, Associate Professor of Radio, Television, and 

Film. B.G.E., University of Omaha; M.A., doctoral study, University of Southern 

California. 
ALCORN, JOHN DOUGLAS, Chairman of Department of Counseling Psychology and 

Counselor Education and Professor of Counseling Psychology and Counselor 

Education. B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., East Texas State University. 
ADLER, HOWARD, Assistant Professor of Institution Administration. B.S., M.S., 

Florida International University. 
ALEXANDER, EDWIN AVERY, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M.E., University of 

Southern Mississippi; M.M., doctoral study, University of Cincinnati Conservatory 

of Music. 
ALLEN, JANIE ARNOLD, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.S., 

Mississippi University for Women; M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississip- 
pi. 
ALLENBACH, STEPHEN ESPALLA, Captain, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of 

Military Science. B. A., University of South Alabama. 
ALONZO, FRANK OLIVER, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice. J. D., University 

of Alabama; M.A., Ph.D., University of Mississippi. 
AMACKER, PATRICIA KAY McCONNELL, Associate Professor of Theatre Arts and 

Director of Dance. B.A., Arizona State University; M.F.A., University of Utah. 
ANDERSEN, PAUL DAVID, Assistant Dean of the College of Fine Arts and Professor 

of Music. B. Mus., Drake University; M.Mus., Syracuse University; Ph.D., 

Washington University. 
ANDERSON, ALFRED LAMAR, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M.E., Mississippi 

College; M.M., Indiana University. 
ANDERSON, BOBBY DEAN, Dean of the College of Education and Psychology and 

Professor of Educational Administration and Supervision, B.S.E. Arkansas State 

College; M.Ed., University of Missouri; Ed.D., University of Tennessee. 
ANDERSON, FRANCES JACOBS, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

B.S., Southern Methodist University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama. 
ANDERSON, GARY, Associate Professor of Biology. B.S., University of Rhode Island; 

M.S., Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 
ANDERSON, HAYWARD GLENN, Associate Professor of Accounting. B.S., M.A., 

University of Southern Mississippi; graduate study, University of Alabama. C.P. A. 
ANDERSON, HOWARD NIX, Associate Professor of Psychology. B.A., Samford 

University; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University 

of Alabama. 
ANDERSON, PAUL GUSTAV, Curator for Special Collections, McCain Library, and 

Assistant Professor of Library Science. B.A., University of Michigan; M.A., 

M.S.L.S., Ph.D., Wayne State University. 



Faculty/345 

ANDERSON, WILLIAM HILTON, Professor of English. B.A., Wofford College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

ANGLIN, ELIZABETH MEE, Instructor of Foreign Languages. B.A., University of 
Colorado; M.A., University of California, Santa Barbara. 

ANGLIN, JAY PASCAL, Associate Professor of History. B.A., Louisiana State 
University; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles. 

ARDOIN, BIRTHNEY, Chairman of Department of Journalism and Associate Professor 
of Journalism. B.A., M.A., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., Ohio University. 

ARNOLD, SARAH ELIZABETH, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 
B.A., M.Ed., Ed.S., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

ASHLEY, GROVER CLEVELAND, Jr., Librarian IV, Director, Cook Library. B.S., 
Arkansas State College; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

ATCHISON, WILLIAM DAVID, Associate Professor of Medical Technology. M.D., 
Medical College of Georgia. 

ATHERTON, SUE BLAKE, Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts. B.F.A., University of 
North Carolina, Greensboro; M.A., University of Illinois. 

AUSTIN, KAREN ODELL, Associate Professor of Foreign Language. B.A., Agnes 
Scott College; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 

AUSTIN, KATHY SLOCOMBE, Librarian II, Media Specialist, Teaching-Learning 
Resources Center. B.A., Tulane University; M.S.L.S., Louisiana State University. 

BAIN, FLORA LEE, Assistant Dean for Administrative Affairs, School of Nursing, and 
Associate Professor of Nursing. B.S.N. , University of Mississippi; M.A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers. 

BAKER, LOUISE DOYLE, Assistant Professor of Adult Education. B.A.A., M.Ed., 
University of Florida; Ph.D., Florida State University. 

BALDWIN, WESLEY LEE, Coordinator and Associate Professor of Mechanical 
Technology. B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Purdue University. P.E. 

BALL, ANGELA SUE, Instructor of English. B. A., Ohio University; M.F. A., Universi- 
ty of Iowa. 

BALM AT, CORA ELIZABETH SUITS, Professor of Nursing-Graduate Program. 
B.S.N. , Louisiana State University, New Orleans; M.S.N., University of California, 
San Francisco; Ph.D., Mississippi State University. 

BARKER, WILMA JEAN, Librarian II, Assistant Government Documents Librarian. 
B.A., University of West Florida; M.L.S., Florida State University. 

BARNES, SHELBY EUGENE, Chairman of Department of Health and Safety Educa- 
tion and Professor of Health and Safety Education. B.A., Southeastern Louisiana 
College; M.Ed., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

BARON, GERALD THOMAS, Associate Professor of Industrial and Vocational Educa- 
tion. B.S., M.S., Florida State University; Ed.D., Arizona State University. 

BARRETT, DORIS WHITEHEAD, Instructor of Medical Technology. B.S., Mississip- 
pi State University; M.T., (ASCP), Mercy Hospital. 

BARTHELME, FREDERICK, Director of Center for Writers and Assistant Professor of 
English. M.A., The Johns Hopkins University. 

BATES, LUCY BALL SHARP, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Pro- 
gram. B,S.N., M.N., University of Mississippi. 

BAXTER, MILTON BURL, SR., Chairman of the Department of Curriculum and In- 
struction and Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.S., M.Ed., 
Mississippi College; Ed.D., University of Alabama. 



346/Faculty 

BEDENBAUGH, ANGELA OWEN, Research Associate in Chemistry. B.S., University 
of Texas; Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

BEDENBAUGH, EDGAR HUGH JR., Professor of Educational Administration and 
Supervision. B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Florida. 

BEDENBAUGH, JOHN HOLCOMBE, Professor of Chemistry. B.S., Newberry Col- 
lege; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Texas. 

BEHM, DENNIS EUGENE, Assistant Professor of Music. B. A., M.F. A., University of 
Iowa. 

BELL, LUE BIRDIA, Instructor of Mathematics. B.S., Alcorn State University; M.S., 
University of Missouri, Columbia. 

BELL, KINLOCK WADE, Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Administrative 
Assistant, and Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies. B.S., Mississippi Valley State 
University; M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi. 

BELL, MARSHALL LENORD, Assistant Professor of Athletic Administration and 
Coaching. B.S., Mississippi Valley State University; M.Ed., University of Southern 
Mississippi; doctoral study, University of Alabama. 

BELLIPANNI, LAWRENCE JOHN, Instructor of Science Education. B.S., M.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi. 

BENJAMIN, ELIZABETH GUTHRIE, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate 
Program. B.S.N. , Northwestern State College; M.N. Emory University; doc- 
toral study, University of Southern Mississippi. 

BERRY, DAVID CHAPMAN, JR., Associate Professor of English. B.S., Bob Jones 
University; B.S., Delta State University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

BERRY, JOHN CALVIN, Associate Professor of Research and Foundations. B.S., 
Alcorn State University; M.S., Indiana University; Ed.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

BETOUNES, DAVID ELTON, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. B. Arch., Universi- 
ty of Southern California, Los Angeles; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University. 

BETOUNES, MYLAN E., Instructor of Mathematics. B.S., Augusta College; M.S., 
Florida State University. 

BISHOP, JAMES C, Director of Communication Services and Assistant Professor of 
Journalism. B.A., University of Mississippi; M.S., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

BISLAND, RALPH BRADFORD, JR., Associate Professor of Computer Science and 
Statistics. B.S., Louisiana State University; M.B.A., Loyola University; D.B.A., 
Mississippi State University. 

BLACK, HAROLD TYRONE, Chairman of Department of Economics and Professor of 
Economics. B.B.A., M.A., Texas Technological University; Ph.D., Tulane Univer- 
sity. 

BLANCHARD, JAY STANLEY, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 
B.A., M.S.T., Drake University; Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

BLOODSWORTH, SUE EVELYN BEARD, Assistant Professor of Nursing- 
Baccalaureate Program. B.S.N. , M.Ed., Medical College of Georgia. 

BODENHAMER, DAVID J., Assistant Professor of History. B.A., Carson-Newman 
College; M.A., University of Alabama; Ph.D., Indiana University. 

BOGART, THEODORE FRANCIS, JR., Program Coordinator and Associate Pro- 
fessor of Electronics Technology. B.S., M.S., University of California, Los 
Angeles; M.S., University of Arizona; doctoral study, North Carolina State Univer- 
sity. 



Faculty/347 

BOHL, MELISSA JANE, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M., Eastman School of 

Music; M.A., University of Notre Dame. 
BONNER, LILLY ANNELLE, Chairman of Department of Business Education and 

Professor of Business Education. B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; 

Ed.D., Indiana University. 
BOOTHE, ROBERT STEPHENS, Instructor of Management. B.S., University of 

Southern Mississippi; M.S., University of Alabama; doctoral study, Florida State 

University. 
BORTHWICK, MIRIAM TECCO, Assistant Professor of Business Education. B.S., 

Ohio University; M.Ed., doctoral study, Kent State University. 
BORTHWICK, PAUL BERTRAM, JR., Associate Professor of Curriculum and In- 
struction. B.S., M.S., Kent State University; Ph.D., University of Akron. 
BOSHEARS, ONVA K., JR., Dean of School of Library Service and Professor of 

Library Science. A.B., Greenville (Illinois) College; M.S., University of Illinois; 

M.A.R., Asbury Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
BOUDREAUX, JANE, Assistant Professor of Institution Administration. B.S., M.S., 

University of Southern Mississippi. 
BOURGEOIS, LAWRENCE LOUIS, Professor of Sociology. A. B., Loyola University; 

M.A., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., Harvard University. 
BOUTWELL, COLEN JESSE, Associate Professor of Construction and Architectural 

Technology. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., University of 

Missouri. 
BOWEN, RICHARD LEE, Professor of Geology. A.B., University of North Carolina; 

M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., University of Melbourne; Fulbright Scholar to 

Australia. 
BOWERS, LAURA BODDIE, Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Science, 

Natchez. B.A., Sophie Newcomb College; B.S., M.S., Louisiana State University. 
BOWERS, RICHARD HUGH, Honors Professor of History and Associate Director, 

Honors College. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Mississippi State University. 
BOWMAN, BILLIE SUE, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. B.S., 

M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 
BOWMAN, JEFF RAY, Chairman x)f Department of Art and Associate Professor of 

Art. B.A., Eastern Kentucky University; M.A., Ed.D., Ball State University. 
BOYD, WILLIAM DOUGLAS, JR., Associate Professor of Library Science. B.A., 

Southwestern at Memphis; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 

Theological Seminary; M.L.S., Ph.D., Indiana University. 
BOYETT, LESSIE JEWELL CALDWELL, Instructor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Pro- 
gram. B.S.N. , Northeast Louisiana University. 
BOYTE, CARLOS LARON, Associate Professor of Industrial and Vocational Educa- 
tion. B.S., M.S., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
BRACEY, HYLER JEFFERY, Professor of Management. B.B. A., Lamar State College 

of Technology; M.B.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
BRADLEY, DONALD O., Major, U.S.A. F., Assistant Professor of Aerospace Studies. 

B.A., University of Mississippi; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 
BRAND, ROSALIE PARKIN, Librarian III, Chief Cataloger, Cook Library. B.S., 

M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 
BRELAND, ANDREW FRANKLIN, JR., Librarian II, Assistant Reference Librarian 

and Coordinator of Shelving Operations, Cook Library. B.S., M.L.S., University 

of Southern Mississippi. 



348/Faculty 

BRELAND, LOIS TRUE, Assistant Professor of English. B.S., M.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

BREMMER, DALE ANTHONY, Assistant Professor of Computer Science and 
Statistics. A.B., St. Benedict's College; M.B.S., University of Colorado; Ed.S., 
Kansas State Teachers College; Ph.D., Texas A & M University. 

BRENT, CHARLES RAY, Director, Institute of Environmental Science, Program Coor- 
dinator of Environmental Technology and Industrial Hygiene, and Professor of En- 
vironmental Science. B.A., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Ph.D., 
Tulane University. 

BRINEGAR, BONNIE CARTER, Assistant Professor of English. B.A., M.A., Univer- 
sity of Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

BRISTER, BILL M., Research Assistant, Bureau of Business Research, and Instructor of 
Economics. B.S., M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 
Southern Mississippi. 

BROOKING, STANLEY ANDERSON, Associate Professor of Management. B.S., 
Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A& M University. 

BROOME, RUTH ANN, Assistant Professor of Institution Administration. B.S., M.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi. 

BROOMHALL, PEGGY GRAVES, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Graduate Program. 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

BROWN, FRED WALDO, Professor of Science Education. B.S., Georgia Southern Col- 
lege; M.A., University of Alabama; Ed.D., University of Georgia. 

BROWN, IVA DINKINS, Professor of Science Education. B.S., Georgia Southern Col- 
lege; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Georgia. 

BROWN, LEIGH BROWNLEE, Instructor of Recreation. B.S., M.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

BROWN, MARIANNE, Assistant Professor of Health and Safety Education. B.S., Delta 
State University; M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; graduate study, Univer- 
sity of Alabama. 

BRUCKNER, DORIS MARIE, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M., M.M., University 
of Michigan. 

BRUNDAGE, WILLIAM GREGORY, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs 
and Associate Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., M.S., Northwestern State 
College; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

BRYANT, GLORIA HULLUM, Associate Professor of Home Economics Education. 
B.S., Tougaloo College; M.S., Tennessee State University; Ph.D., Florida State 
University. 

BRYANT, MARY LOUISE SCHOFIELD, Assistant Professor of Nursing- 
Baccalaureate Program. B.S.N. , Sacred Heart Dominican College; M.N., Universi- 
ty of Mississippi. 

BRYSON, MELBA RUTH, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. 
B.S.N. , East Carolina University; M.N., University of Mississippi. 

BUFKIN, BILLY GEORGE, Chairman of Department of Polymer Science and Pro- 
fessor of Polymer Science. B.S., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

BULLARD, GEORGE EDWIN, Associate Professor of Business Administration and 
Coordinator of Undergraduate Programs in Business, Gulf Coast. B.S., University 
of Arizona; M.S., Mississippi State University. 

BULLOCK, WILLIAM JOSEPH, Associate Professor of Music and Director of Choral 
Activities. B.M.E., M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University. 



Faculty/349 

BUMGARDNER, WALTER HENRY, Associate Professor of Recreation. B.A., M.S., 
Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., Texas A & M University. 

BUNCH, CORRIE LYNNE, Librarian III, Chief Acquisition Librarian, Cook Library. 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S. in L.S., George Peabody College. 
BURCH, JOHN CECIL, Assistant Dean and Associate Professor of Counseling 

Psychology and Counselor Education, Gulf Coast. B.A., University of Minnesota; 

M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
BURCHELL, LARK CHARLES, Chairman of Department of Recreation and Associate 

Professor of Recreation. B.S., East Central State College (Oklahoma); M.T., 

Southwestern State College (Oklahoma); Ph.D., Texas A & M University. 
BURGE, CECIL DWIGHT, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Statistics. 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Mississippi State University. 
BURGESS, CHARLES DUANE, JR., Part-time Associate Professor of Psychology. 

B.S., Mississippi College. M.D., University of Mississippi Medical School. 
BURKS, ROBERT ELBERT, JR., Associate Professor of Polymer Science. B.S., 

Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
BURNS, WILLIAM BAXTER, Chairman of Department of Industrial and Vocational 

Education and Associate Professor of Industrial and Vocational Education. B.S., 

M.S., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
BURR, RONALD LEWIS, Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion. B.A., 

California State University, Los Angeles; M.A., University of Hawaii; Ph.D., 

University of California, Santa Barbara. 
BURRUS, JOHN NEWELL, Chairman of Department of Sociology and Anthropology 

and Distinguished University Professor of Sociology. A.B., University of Mississip- 
pi; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
BURTON, JAMES HARPER, Associate Professor of Finance, Bridges Chair of Real 

Estate. B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Georgia State University, C.R.A. 
BUSCHNER, CRAIG ALAN, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. B.S., Virginia 

Commonwealth University; M.S., Western Illinois; Ed.D., Oklahoma State Univer- 
sity. 
BYRD, MARQUITA LAVON, Assistant Professor of Speech Communication. B.S.E., 

Central Missouri State University; M.A., Southern Illinois University, Edward- 

sville; doctoral study, University of Missouri. 
CABANISS, VICKY JANE, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. 

B.S.N. , M.N. , University of Mississippi Medical Center. 

CADE, ROBERT BURR, Assistant Professor of Radio, Television, and Film. B.A., 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
CADE, RUTH ANN TAYLOR, Associate Professor of Computer Science and 

Statistics. B.S., Mississippi State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama. 
CAKE, EDWIN WOOD, JR., Assistant Professor of Biology, Gulf Coast Research 

Laboratory. B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University. 
CAMERON, OTTAMISE COLLEEN WHITTINGTON, Associate Professor of 

Economics. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; D.B.A., Indiana 

University. 

CANFIELD, DENNIS VINCENT, Assistant Professor of Polymer Science. B.S., Lyn- 
chburg College; M.S., John Jay College of Criminal Justice; doctoral study, North- 
eastern University. 



350/Faculty 

CARLSON, KENNETH' LEE, Assistant Professor of Health and Safety Education. 
B.S., M.S., Ed.S., Central Missouri State College. 

CARMICHAEL, MARY ANN, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 
B.S., M.Ed., Ed.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

CARNOVALE, AUGUST NORBERT, Chairman of Department of Music and Pro- 
fessor of Music. B.M., Louisiana State University; M.A., Columbia University; 
D.Mus.A., University of Iowa. 

CARPENTER, JAMES RAY, Golf Professional— USM Golf Course and Instructor of 
Athletic Administration and Coaching. B.S., M.A., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

CARPENTER, STANLEY MALCOLM, Associate Professor of Accounting. B.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; M.B.A., doctoral study, University of Georgia. 
C.P.A. 

CARR, CAROL ANN, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. B.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; M.S.N. University of Alabama, Birmingham. 

CARR, GORDON L., Part-time Associate Professor of Psychology. B.A., Southern Il- 
linois University; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

CARR, MARY SUSAN, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. 
B.S.N. , St. Louis University; M.S.N. , University of Alabama, Birmingham. 

CARR, WILBUR LLOYD, Professor of Health and Safety Education. B.A., M.A., 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

CARRIERE, MARIUS, JR., Coordinator of History and Social Studies and Assistant 
Professor, Natchez. B.A., University of Southwestern Louisiana; M.A., Stephen 
Austin University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

CARTEE, CHARLES PRENTISS, Associate Professor of Finance and Senior Research 
Associate, Bureau of Business Research. B.S., Mississippi College; M.A., Memphis 
State University; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

CARTER, DANNY REED, Chairman of Department of Computer Science and 
Statistics and Associate Professor of Computer Science and Statistics. B.S., M.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

CARTER, GEORGE HENRY, Associate Professor of Economics. B.S., M.S., Universi- 
ty of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Texas A & M University. 

CASCIO, ANTHONY FRANK, JR., Captain, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military 
Science. B.A., University of Connecticut. 

CASTON, EVERETTE EUGENE, Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology and 
Counselor Education. B.S.E., M.E.D., Delta State University; Ed.D., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

CAUDILL, ORLEY BRANDT, Professor of Political Science. B.S., M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Maryland. 

CAVENY, DAVID JAMES, Chairman of Department of Mathematics and Associate 
Professor of Mathematics. B.S., Western Carolina College; M.A., Ph.D., Universi- 
ty of Kentucky. 

CHATHAM, IRIS MICHAEL, Instructor of Speech Communication. B.S., University 
of Southern Mississippi; M.S., William Carey College. 

CICCARELLI, ORAZIO ANDREA, Associate Professor of History. B. A, Francis Col- 
lege; M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida. 

CLEMENTS, JOSEPH HARDIN, Professor of Finance. A. B., University of Kentucky; 
M.B.A., University of Mississippi; Ed.D., University of Oklahoma. 



Faculty/351 

CLIBURN, JOSEPH WILLIAM, Professor of Biology. B.S., Millsaps College; M.A., 
University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Alabama. 

COGHILL, NANCY TAYLOR, Assistant Professor of Family Life Services. B.S., Ohio 
State University; M.S.H.E., University of North Carolina, Greenboro; Ph.D., 
Florida State University. 

CONERLY, DONNA LYNN, Associate Professor of Business Education. B.S., M.S., 
Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

CONKLIN, ROBERT DALE, Honors Assistant Professor of History. B.S., Purdue 
University; M.A., Ph.D., Kent State University. 

CONROY, JAMES E., Colonel U.S.A.F., Chairman of Department of Aerospace 
Studies and Professor of Aerospace Studies. B.A., St. Thomas College, (Min- 
nesota); M.S., Central Missouri State University. 

CONVILLE, RICHARD LANE, JR., Chairman of Department of Speech Communica- 
tion and Associate Professor of Speech Communication. B.A., Samford University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

COOKE, ROBERT SAMUEL, JR., Associate Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., 
M.D., University of Arkansas. 

COOLEY, WILLIE EARL, Administrative Assistant, Director of Student Teaching, and 
Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., University 
of Southern Mississippi. 

COOPER, WALTER ELMORE, JR., Dean of School of Health, Physical Education, 
and Recreation and Professor of Physical Education. B.S., Huntingdon College; 
M.A., Ed.D., University of Alabama. 

COTTEN, DONALD RAY, Assistant Professor of Science Education. B.S., M.S., 

University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., West Virginia University. 
COX, ALLAN EUGENE, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M.E., University of 

Nebraska; M.M., Wichita State University. 
CRACRAFT, JOSEPH DAVID, Associate Professor of Physical Education. B.A., 

M.A., California State University, Sacramento; Ph.D., University of Utah. 
CREED, DAVID, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of 

Manchester, England. 
CREWS, ROBERT THORNTON, Assistant Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., 

M.S., Auburn University; M.T.(ASCP), Baylor University Hospital. 

CROOK, GEORGE TRUETT, JR., Associate Professor of Theatre Arts. B. A., M.A., 
University of California, Davis. 

CROSS, RALPH DONALD, Associate Professor of Geography. A.B., Eastern 

Michigan; M.A., University of Oklahoma; Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
CRUMBAUGH, JAMES C, Part-time Associate Professor of Psychology. A. B., Baylor 

University; M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of Texas, 

Austin. 
CULBERSON, JAMES OLIN, Professor of Counseling Psychology and Counselor 

Education. B.S., Bob Jones University; M.Ed., University of South Carolina; 

Ed.D., University of Georgia. 
CUNDIFF, DAVID ELBERT, Professor of Physical Education and Director of Physical 

Fitness Institute. B.S., Union University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
CUNDIFF, LINDA, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. B.S., Union University; 

M.S., University of Illinois. 



352/Faculty 

CUNNINGHAM, DAVID FRANKLIN, Professor of Research and Foundations. 

B.S.E., Arkansas State Teachers College; M.A., George Peabody College; Ed.D., 

University of Houston. 
CURRIE, BILLYE BOB McCARVER, Part-time Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
CUSHMAN, MARTHA DEABLER, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M.E., University 

of Kansas; M.M., University of Illinois. 
DALE, JOHN HARBERT, Assistant Professor of Science Education. B.S., Mississippi 

State University; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 
DANIEL, DONNIE LADD, Associate Professor of Finance. B.S., Mississippi College; 

M.S., Mississippi State University; Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
DANIEL, HUGH H., Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Gulf Coast. B.S., 

Austin Peay State University; M.A., Middle Tennessee State University; doctoral 

study, University of Mississippi. 

DANIELS, JACK LEMORE, Professor of Counseling Psychology and Counselor 

Education. B.S., University of Texas; M.Ed., Stephen F. Austin State College; 

Ph.D., East Texas State University. 
DAUGHERTY, CHARLES E., Captain U.S.A.F., Assistant Professor of Aerospace 

Studies. B.S., McNeese State University; M.S., University of Southern California. 

C.P.A. 
DAVIDSON, CHARLES WINFREY, Professor of Research and Foundations. B.S., 

Louisiana Polytechnic University; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Arkansas. 
DAVIS, BEVERLY JANICE, Instructor of Mathematics. B.S., M.S., University of 

Southern Mississippi. 
DAVIS, BONNIE JEAN, Professor of Research and Foundations. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 

University of Southern Mississippi. 
DAVIS, EVELYN BLACKLEDGE, Assistant Professor of Environmental Design. B.S., 

M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, University of Tennessee. 
DAVIS, JAMES LOUIS, Associate Professor of Management. B.S., M.S., University of 

Southern Mississippi; doctoral study. Louisiana State University. 
DAVIS, JENNIFER GAIL LUCAS, Instructor of English. B.A., University of 

Southern Mississippi; M.A., University of Mississippi. 
DAVIS, JOHN CHESTER, III, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 

B.S.,M.Ed., Ed.D., East Texas State University. 
DAVIS, JOSEPH KIMBRELL, Professor of English. B.S., University of Southern 

Mississippi; M.A., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., Emory University. 
DAWSON, CHARLES E., Assistant Professor of Biology, Gulf Coast Research 

Laboratory. B.S., University of Miami. 
DEANS, KENNETH NORWOOD, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M.E., East 

Carolina University; M.M., University of Michigan; doctoral study, University of 

Iowa. 
DEAR, JAMES ESTUS, Professor of Accounting. B.S., Northeast Louisiana State Col- 
lege; M.B.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. C.P.A. 
DeARMEY, MICHAEL HOWARD, Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

B.A., M.A., Memphis State University; Ph.D., Tulane University. 
DENNIS, CHARLES N., Professor of Finance. B.A., Southern Methodist University; 

M.A., Memphis State University; Ph.D., University of Arkansas. C.F.A. 



Faculty/353 

DENNIS, PERRY BROOKS, Associate Professor of Music and Associate Professsor of 
Curriculum and Instruction. B.S., Mississippi State University; B.Mus.Ed., Vander- 
cook School of Music; M.Mus.Ed., University of Michigan; D.Mus.Ed., University 
of Southern Mississippi. 

DENTON, ROY THOMAS, Associate Professor of Social Work. B.S., M.S.S.W., 
University of Tennessee; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

DEVINE, FRANCIS EDWARD, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice. A.B., Har- 
vard College; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

DeWITT, MARY RITA, Assistant Professor of Art. B.F.A., M.F.A., University of 
Alabama. 

DICKERSON, GALE SANDERS, Assistant Professor of Family Life Services. B.S., 
M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, Ohio State University. 

DICKSON, ANDREW LINK. Associate Professor of Psychology. B.A., University of 
South Carolina; M.A., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma. 

DIXON, PAMELA JEAN, Instructor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.S., Mississippi 
University for Women. 

DOBLIN, STEPHEN ALAN, Associate Professor of Mathematics. B.S., M. A., Ph.D., 
University of Alabama. 

DODGE, NANCY F., Professor of Nursing-Graduate Program. B.S.N. E., Florida State 
University; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University. 

DONNELL, LINDA B., Assistant Professor of Environmental Design, B.S., M.S., 
Ed.E., University of Southern Mississippi. 

DONOHUE, JOHN ROBERT, Associate Professor of Music. B.M., M.M., Louisiana 
State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

DONOVAN, JACK POLLARD, Professor of Music and Coordinator of Graduate 
Studies. B.S., M.Mus., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

DORE, DONALD EDWARD, JR., Associate Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., 
M.D., Louisiana State University. 

DUBARD, NETTIE ETOILE, Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences. B.S., Mary 
Hardin-Baylor University; M.A., George Peabody College; Ph.D., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

DUBUISSON, WANDA LORRAINE CLEVELAND, Assistant Professor of Nursing- 
Baccalaureate Program. B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S.N., Univer- 
sity of Mississippi Medical Center. 

DUNIGAN, NANCY CASEY, Associate Professor of Mathematics. A.B., Greensboro 
College; M.M., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

DUNLAP, WILLIAM RICHBOURG, Professor of Social Work. B.C.E., Auburn 
University; M.S.W., Ed.D., University of Alabama. 

DURKEE, PETER EASTON, Vice President for Student Affairs and Associate Pro- 
fessor of Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education. A.B., M.A., Colgate 
University; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

DUSSICH, JOHN PETER JOSEPH, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice. B.S., 
M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University. National Institute of Criminal Justice 
Fellowship. 

EASTERLINCi, CYNTHIA RUSSELL, Associate Professor of Environmental Design. 
B.F.A., Stephens College; M.S., Louisiana Slate University; Ph.D., Florida State 
University. 



354/Faculty 

EDWARDS, RONALD PHILIP, Associate Professor of Psychology. B.S., Oklahoma 
Slate University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

LDWARDS, SYLVIA SMITH, Instructor of Sociology. B.S., C.S.W., M.S.W., Loui- 
siana State University. 

EDWARDS, WARRICK RIDGELY, III, Assistant Professor of History. B.S., M.A., 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

EICKEMEYER, KARL FREDERICK, Instructor of Business Administration, Gulf 
Coast. B.A., Oberlin College; M.B.A., George Washington University. 

EIDSON, BEVERLY ANN, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. 
B.S.N. , M.N., University of Mississippi School of Nursing. 

ELAKOVICH, STELLA DAISY, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Administrative 
Assistant. B.S., Texas Christian University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

ELIAS, LOUIS, JR., Director of Student Services and Instructor of Research and Foun- 
dations, Gulf Coast. B.S., M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral 
study, University of Mississippi. 

ELLENDER, RUDOLPH DENNIS, JR., Associate Professor of Microbiology. B.S., 
M.S., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., Texas A & M University. 

ENDERLIN, REX P., Assistant Professor of Music. B.Mus.Ed., University of the 
Pacific; M.M., University of Tennessee. 

ESSARY, ALICE WILKINSON, Instructor of Mathematics. B.S., M.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

ESTES, THOMAS GLENVALL, JR., Vice President for Business and Finance and 
Associate Professor of Accounting. B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., 
Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., University of Arkansas. C.P.A. 

ETZOLD, DAVID JULIUS, Professor of Management. B.S., Mississippi State Universi- 
ty; M.B.A., Rollins College; D.B.A., Mississippi State University. 

EURE, MARTHA NETTERVILLE, Librarian I, Assistant Cataloger, Cook Library. 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

EVANS, JEFFREY ALAN, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. B. A., Graceland College; 
Ph.D., University of Kansas Medical Center. 

FARRELL, GEORGE EDWARD, II, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate 
Program. B.S.N. , Syracuse University; M.S.N., University of Colorado. 

FAULKENDER, PATRICIA JOYCE, Assistant Professor of Psychology. B.S., M.S., 
Ph.D., University of Kansas. 

FAULKINBERRY, MARY EVELYN McCOMIC, Chairman of Department of Home 
Economics Education and Professor of Home Economics Education. B.S., Texas 
Woman's University; M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's 
University. 

FAUST, MARGARET CECILIA, Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts. B.F.A.. Texas 
Christian University; M.F.A., University of Utah. 

FAWCETT, NEWTON C Rt Id, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. B.S., University of 
Denver; M.S., Ph.D., University of New Mexico. 

FAY, TEMPLE HAROLD, Associate Professor of Mathematics. B.S., Guilford Col- 
lege, M.S., Wake Forest University; Ph.D., University of Florida. 

FLAMSII R. JOHN HARRY, Part-lime Associate Professor of Psychology. A.B., 
Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 

FERGUSON, DARNELL, Instructor of Medical Technology. B.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 



Faculty/355 

FERGUSON, WILLIAM FRANKLIN, Associate Professor of Research and Founda- 
tions. B.S., M.Ed., Mississippi State University; Ed.D., University of Mississippi. 

FIKE, CLAUDE EDWIN, Director of McCain Library, University Archivist, and Pro- 
fessor of History. A.B., Duke University; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois. 

FINNEGAN, MARY TERESA, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaurate Program. 
B.S., St. Mary College; M.S., University of Maryland. 

FISH, ARTHUR GEOFFREY, Associate Professor of Biology. B.S., Carleton Universi- 
ty; M.S., McGill University; Ph.D., University of British Columbia. 

FLETCHER, TYLER HERRICK, Chairman of Department of Criminal Justice and 
Associate Professor of Criminal Justice. B.A., University of Texas; M.S., doctoral 
study, Michigan Slate University and University of Mississippi. 

FOLSE, RAYMOND FRANCIS, JR., Associate Professor of Physics. B.S., Loyola 
University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

FONTECCHIO, GIOVANNI, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. B.S., North 
ern Michigan University; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

FOWLER, DAVID GAYLE, Instructor of Medical Technology. B.S., M.T. Certificate, 
Mississippi State University; M.C.S., University of Mississippi Medical Center. 

FRAIR, JOHN ALLEN, Assistant Professor of Journalism. B.S., M.A., East Texas 
State University. 

FREEMAN, SHIRLIE ANN, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. 
B.S., Southeastern Louisiana University; M.N., University of Mississippi. 

FROLICHER, FRANZ, Assistant Professor of Geology. B.A., Alaska Methodist Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. 

FRUGE', NICHOLAS HUGH, Assistant to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and 
Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., McNeese 
State University. 

GAAR, BASIL LEE, Associate Professor of Special Education. B.S., East Central State 
College, Oklahoma; M.Ed., University of Houston; Ph.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

GALLASPY, JAMES BOLAN, JR., Assistant Professor of Athletic Administration 
and Coaching. B.S., M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi; Athletic Training 
Speciali/ation, Indiana State University. 

GARCIA, EDWARD ARTHUR, Assistant Professor of Research and Foundations. 
B.S., Texas A & I University; M.S., East Texas State University. 

GARDNER, WILLIAM PAYNE, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Gulf 
Coast. B.S., Mississippi State University; M.B.A., University of Southern Mississip- 
pi. 

GATES, LARRY JAMES, Associate Professor of Psychology. B.A., Eastern Illinois 
University; M.Ed., University of Illinois; Ph.D., George Peabody College. 

GAVIN, ROBERT E., Assistant Professor of Research and Foundations. B.S., William 
Carey College; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

GIBBS, SARAH LITTLETON WI AVER, Dean of School of Home Economics and 
Professor of Institution Administration. B.S., M.A., University of Southern 
Mississippi; Ph.D., Florida Slate University. 

(ilBSON, G.C., Associate Professor of Educational Administration, Natchez. B.S., 
Southwestern Louisiana University; Mid., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

GECEWICZ, JAMES J., MAJOR U.S.A.F., Assistant Professor of Aerospace 
Studies. B.S., Husson College (Maine); M.A., Stale University of New York. 



356/Faculty 

GILES, MICHAEL COMER, Director of Aquatics and Assistant Professor of Athletic 

Administration and Coaching. B.S., University of Alabama; M.S., University of 

Southern Mississippi. 
GINN, CLYDE NEULAN, Dean of Continuing Education and Public Service and 

Associate Professor of Educational Administration and Supervision. B.S., M.Ed., 

University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., McNeese State University. 
GJESTLAND, DAVID SIDNEY, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Gulf Coast. 

B.A., M.A., California State University, Northridge; doctoral study, University of 

California, Santa Barbara. 
GOFF, DAVID HENRY, Assistant Professor of Radio, Television, and Film. B.A., 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts. 
GOFF, LINDA D., Assistant Professor of Speech Communication. B.S., Ohio State 

University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts. 
COINS, BERTHA C. NICHOLSON, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate 

Program. B.S., Dillard University; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 
GOLDBERG, SANDRA JILL, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M., Peabody Conser- 
vatory of Music; M.M., Eastman School of Music. 
GONZALES, JOHN EDMOND, The William D. McCain Chair of History and 

Distinguished University Professor of History. B.S., M.A., Louisiana State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
GORE, BILL WES, Dean and Associate Professor of Educational Research, Natchez. 

B.S., Mississippi College; M.S., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., University of 

Southern Mississippi. 
GOTTLEBER, HENRY ARTHUR, Professor of Management. B.S., University of 

Southern Mississippi; M.B.A., Boston University; Ph.D., University of Arkansas. 
GOWER, ALBERT EDWARD, JR., Professor of Music and Coordinator of 

Undergraduate Studies. A.B., Sacramento State College; M.M., University of 

Oregon; Ph.D., North Texas State University. 
GOWER, WILLIAM TURNER, Professor of Music. B.Mus., M.Mus., University of 

Denver; M.F.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa. 
GRAHAM, SHANNON D., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Graduate Program. 

B.S.N. E., University of Minnesota; M.A., Stetson University. 
GRANTHAM, BILLY JOE, Chairman of Department of Biology and Professor of 

Biology. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
GRANTHAM, WILLIAM RADER, Dean of Students and Assistant Professor of 

Athletic Administration and Coaching. B.S., M.A., University of Southern 

Mississippi; doctoral study, Louisiana State University. 
GREEN, BILLY LEON, Director of Administrative Data Processing and Instructor of 

Finance. B.A., M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 
GREEN, JOHN ELWYN, Dean of the College of Fine Arts and Professor of Music. 

B.M., M.M., University of Illinois; Ed.D., University of Southern California. 
GREEN LINDA MARIE, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M., University of Illinois; 

M.M., Easi Carolina University. 
GREENE, JOSEPH ARTHUR, JR., Dean of the College of Business Administration 

and Professor of Economics. B.A., Berea College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Virginia. 
GRIFFIN, ANSELM CLYDE, III, Associate Professor of Chemistry. B.S., Mississippi 

College; Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin. 



Faculty/357 

2 GUICE, JOHN DAVID WYNNE, Professor of History. B. A., Yale University; M. A., 

University of Texas; Ph.D., University of Colorado. 
GUILBEAU, NEWTS EASTON, Assistant Professor of Music. B.Mus., M.M.Ed., 

North Texas State University. 
GUNTER, GORDON, Director Emeritus, Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, and Pro- 
fessor of Biology. A.B., Northwestern State College of Louisiana; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Texas. 
GURMAN, ERNEST BASIL, Associate Professor of Psychology. B.S., University of 

Southern Mississippi; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
GUTSCH, KENNETH URIAL, Professor of Counseling Psychology and Counselor 

Education. B.M., University of Miami; M.Ed., University of Mississippi; Ed.D., 

Florida State University. 
GWIN, STANFORD PAYNE, Professor of Speech Communication. B.S., M.S., 

University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Florida. 
HAILEY, BARBARA JO, Assistant Professor of Psychology. B.A., M.S., University of 

Florida; Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
HALL, JAMES LARRY, Chairman of Department of Radio, Television, and Film, 

Associate Professor of Radio, Television, and Film, and Coordinator of Division of 

Communication. B.A., Louisiana College; M.A., Louisiana State University; 

Ph.D., Ohio University. 
HAMMAN, ALTRA HOWSE GILL, Chairman of Department of Family Life Services 

and Professor of Family Life Services. B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 

M.S., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., Texas Woman's College. 
HAMWI, ISKANDAR SALOUM, Professor of Finance. B.A., Damascus University; 

M.A.S., University of Michigan; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

HARGROVE, DAVID SCOTT, Part-time Assistant Professor of Social Work. B.A., 

Mississippi State University; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
HARKINS, ELIZABETH CATHERINE, Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor 

of Nursing. B.S.N. E., St. Mary College; M.S.N., Catholic University; Adv. M.Ed., 

Ph.D., Florida State University. 
HARPER, GLENN TERRY, Assistant Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Pro- 
fessor of History. B.A., Furman Univeristy; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 
HARRINGTON, EARNEST LAWRENCE, Tennis Coach, Trainer, Equipment 

Manager, and Assistant Professor of Athletic Administration and Coaching. B.S., 

M.E., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
HARRIS, ANTHONY J., Counselor, Student Counseling, and Instructor of Counseling 

Psychology and Counselor Education. B.S., M.S., University of Southern 

Mississippi. 
HARRIS, CAROLYN R. McADAMS, Instructor of Mathematics. B.A., Texas Tech 

University. 
HARRIS, EMMA B., Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Science, Natchez. 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.L.S., Louisiana State University. 
HARRIS, WILLIAM THOMAS, JR., Associate Professor of Accounting. B.B.A., 

M.B.A., Texas Technological College; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. C.P.A. 
HARRISON, MARION H. COOK, Instructor of Accounting. B.S., M.S., University of 

Southern Mississippi. 
HARSH, JOHN RICHARD, Associate Professor of Psychology. B. A., Ohio University; 

M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green State University. 



358/Faculty 

HARWELL, GEORGE ARTHUR, Assistant Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., 

M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 
HATCHER, WILLIAM HAMILTON, Chairman of Department of Political Science 

and Professor of Political Science. B.A., M.A., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., 

Duke University. 
HAUER, STANLEY R., Assistant Professor of English. B. A., M. A., Auburn Universi- 
ty; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 
HAWKINS, WILLIAM E., Assistant Professor (Assistant Electron Microscopist, Gulf 

Coast Research Laboratory). B.S., Mississippi State University; M.S., Ph.D., 

University of Mississippi Medical Center. 
HAYES, PATRICIA ANN TAYLOR, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate 

Program; B.S.N. , Tuskegee Institute; Certificate of Public Health Epidemiology, 

Cornell Medical School; M.A.N. , New York University. 
'HAYNIE, CHERYL ANN, Instructor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. B.S., Univer- 
sity of Southern Mississippi. 
HAYS, PATRICIA RUTH McCOY, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M.Ed., M.A., 

University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, University of Oregon. 
HEIDEN, CHARLES HOWARD, Chairman of Department of Industrial Technology 

and Associate Professor of Industrial Technology. B.S., United States Naval 

Academy; M.S., New Mexico State University; doctoral study, University of 

Mississippi. P.E. 
HEISLER, DAVID MARK, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. B. A., 

University of New Mexico; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
HENDERSON, JULIAN C, Associate Professor of Medical Technology. B.A., 

Florence State University; M.D., Tulane University School of Medicine. 
HENSLEY, BONNIE LEE, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and 

Elementary Education Coordinator, Natchez. B.S., Mississippi College; M.S., 

Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
HERRINGTON, JANIE VINCENT, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Pro- 
gram. B.S., B.S.N. , University of Southern Mississippi; M.S.N., University of 

Alabama, Birmingham. 
HERZINGER, KIM ALLEN, Assistant Professor of English. B.A., Oberlin College; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Rochester. 
HESTER, ROGER DAVID, Associate Professor of Polymer Science. B.S., Auburn 

University; M.S., Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology. 
HETRICK, WILLIAM MELVIN, Associate Professor of Educational Administration 

and Supervision. B.S., Bowling Green State University; M.Ed., Eastern Michigan 

University; Ed.D., Western Michigan University. 

HICKMAN, DIXIE ELISE, Director of Composition and Assistant Professor of 
English. B.A., University of Mississippi; M.A., Duke University; Ph.D. University 
of Iowa. 

HILDMAN, LEE KEMBERLY, Assistant Professor of Psychology. B.S., M.S., Florida 
State University; doctoral study, University of Florida. 

HILDMAN, TOMMIE BLOMFIELD CROOKS, Assistant Professor of Nursing- 
Baccalaureate Program. B.S., Louisiana State University, New Orleans; M.Ed., 
Columbia University. 

HILL, ROBERT BYRON, Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts. B. A., Catawba College; 
M.F.A., Southern Methodist University. 



Faculty/359 

HILL, ROGER HARVEY, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M., M.M., Indiana Univer- 
sity. 

HILL, VIRGINIA SWANN, Associate Professor of Management. B.S., M.B.A., 
University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

HIMELSTEIN, JERRY DOUGLAS, Assistant Professor of Sociology. B. A., University 
of Oklahoma; M.A., Hebrew Union College; doctoral study, Louisiana State 
University. 

HOBSON, KAY FRANCES, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. 
B.S.N. , Tuskegee Institute; M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia. 

HOFFMAN, LEE McGRAW, Assistant Professor of Adult Education. B.A., Sophie 
Newcomb College, Tulane University; M. Ed., Ed. D., North Carolina State 
University. 

HOLCOMB, CHERYL TERESA, Librarian II, Assistant Reference Librarian, Cook 
Library. B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S.L.S., University of Ten- 
nessee. 

HOLLANDSWORTH, JAMES GUY, JR., Associate Professor of Counseling 
Psychology and Counselor Education. B.A., Davidson College; M.Ed., Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina. 

HOLLIMAN, WILLIAM BRUCE, Assistant Professor of Psychology. B.S., M.A., 
Memphis State University; Ph.D., East Texas State University 

HOLLOWAY, JOE EARL, Dean and Associate Professor of Educational Administra- 
tion, Gulf Coast, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

HONG, SHERMAN, Associate Professor of Music. B.M.Ed., University of Southern 
Mississippi; M.Mus.Ed., Northwestern University; Ed.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

HOUSLEY, ROBERT EUGENE, Major, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military 
Science. B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

HOWELL, FREDDIE GENE, Associate Professor of Biology. B.S., Texas A & M 
University; M.S., Ph.D., Texas Tech University. 

HOWELL, JOHN EMORY, Director of Teaching-Learning Resources Center and Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry. B.S.Ed., Marion College; M.N.S., Arizona State University; 
Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

HOWELL, NANCY BEARDEN, Instructor of Computer Science and Statistics. B.S., 
M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

HOWSE, HAROLD D., Director of the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory and Professor 
of Biology. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Tulane Universi- 
ty. 

HUCH, MARY HALLEY, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. 
B.S.N. , Duquesne University; M.N., University of Pittsburgh. 

HUDSON, MABEL JANE, Assistant Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., Mississip- 
pi University for Women; M.S., Mississippi State University. 

HUEY, JON, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science. B.A., M.S., doctoral 
study, University of Iowa. 

HUGHES, WILLIAM EUGENE, Chairman of Department of Physics and Astronomy 
and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 
Ph.D., University of Alabama. 

HUNTER, ELVIN MAX, Professor of Industrial and Vocational Education. B.S., 
M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Missouri. 



360/Faculty 

HUTCHINSON, MARY MEEKS, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Pro- 
gram. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

HUTTON, BEN OSCAR, Professor of Counseling Psychology and Counselor Educa- 
tion. B.S., Southwest Missouri State University; M.Ed., Drury College; Ed.D., 
University of Arkansas. 

HYATT, ROBERT M., Instructor of Computer Science and Statistics. B.S., University 
of Southern Mississippi. 

IMBRAGULIO, GEORGE EUGENE, Associate Professor of Music. B.M., M.M., 
Michigan State University; summer study: Aspen, Colorado; St. Cecelia Conser- 
vatory, Rome, Italy; Florida State University; Michigan State University. 

INNES-BROWN, ELIZABETH ANN, Assistant Professor of English. B.A., St. 
Lawrence University; M.F.A., Columbia University. 

IRBY, BOBBY NEWELL, Chairman of Department of Science Education and Professor 
of Science Education. B.A., University of Washington; M.S., Ed.D., University of 
Mississippi. 

IVY, THOMAS TUCKER, Chairman of Department of Marketing and Professor of 
Marketing. B.A., Hendrix College; M.Ed., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., Arizona 
State University. 

JACKSON, HOWARD OLIVER, Assistant Dean of College of Business Administration 
and Associate Professor of Accounting. B.S., M.A., University of Southern 
Mississippi; graduate study, University of Alabama. C.P. A. 

JAMES, DIANA KAY, Women's Basketball Coach and Instructor of Athletic Ad- 
ministration and Coaching. B.S., Mississippi University for Women; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Southern Mississippi. 

JEROME, RAOUL FRANK HOWARD, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M., M.M., 
North Texas State University. 

JETER, MELVYN WILLIAM, Associate Professor of Mathematics. B.S., Midwestern 
University; M.S., North Texas State University; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 

JOBE, MARTHA PATRICIA, Director, Educational Kindergarten and Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.A., M.Ed., Ed.S., Ph.D., University of 
Mississippi. 

JOHNSON, SUE ELLEN, Instructor, Curriculum and Instruction. B.A., M.A., Univer- 
sity of Southern Mississippi. 

JOHNSON, MARION CLOWER, Chairman of Department of Athletic Administration 
and Coaching and Associate Professor of Athletic Administration and Coaching. 
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Louisiana State University; doctoral 
study, Indiana University. 

JOHNSON, MICHAEL ROY, Instructor of Music. B.M., University of Alabama. 

JOHNSON, REBECCA TATE, Instructor of Music. B.S.Ed., Concord College; M.M., 
University of Southern Mississippi. 

JOHNSON, ROGER BARTON, JR., Professor of Foreign Languages. B. A., University 
of Southern Mississippi; A.M., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

JONES, GARY EDWIN, Associate Professor of Psychology. B.A., Pennsylvania State 
University; M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green State University. 

JONES, LEE WAYNE, Director of Educational Media Programs and Associate Pro- 
fessor of Research and Foundations. B.M., M.Ed., Stephen F. Austin State Univer- 
sity; Ed.D., East Texas State University. 



Faculty/361 

JONES, SHIRLEY JOAN, Dean of the Graduate School of Social Work and Professor 

of Social Work. B.S., M.A., M.S.W., New York University; Ph.D., Columbia 

University. 
JORDAN, ANNE MILLER, Associate Dean of Students (Women) and Instructor of 

Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education. B.A., M.Ed., University of 

Southern Mississippi. 
JORDAN, BRYCE DONNELL, Associate Professor of Finance. B.S., Mississippi State 

University; M.P.A., Harvard University; doctoral study, University of Alabama. 
KARNES, FRANCES ANN, Associate Professor of Special Education. B.S., Quincy 

College (Illinois); Ed.M., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
KAY, WALLACE GRANT, Dean of the Honors College and Honors Professor of 

English. B.A., Southern Methodist University; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University. 
KAZELSKIS, RICHARD, Director of Bureau of Research and Educational Programs 

and Professor of Research and Foundations. B.S., Ed.D., University of Georgia. 
KELLEY, ARTHELL, Professor of Geography. B.S., University of Southern Mississip- 
pi; M.A., University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of Nebraska. 
KELLY, JOHN MICHEAL, Librarian II and Assistant Curator for Special Collections, 

McCain Library. B.A., Northwestern University; A.M.L.S., University of 

Michigan. 
KELLY, SYLVIA ALICE, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. B.S., 

Mississippi College; B.S.N., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S.N. , University 

of Alabama, Birmingham. 
KENAMOND, FREDERICK DILL, Professor of Accounting. A.B., Shepard College; 

M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Alabama. C.P.A. 
KILPATRICK, BOB GRISSOM, Instructor of Accounting. B.S., M.S., University of 

Southern Mississippi. 
KING, ROBERT WILLIAM, Associate Professor of Mathematics. B.S., M. A., Univer- 
sity of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University. 
KING, ROGER TERRY, Professor of Finance. B.B.A., University of Mississippi; 

M.B.A., D.B.A., Texas Technological College. 

KNIGHT, HAROLD VICTOR, Professor of Research and Foundations and Director of 
Research Training. B.S., Livingston State College; M.S.Ed., Northwestern State 
College of Louisiana; Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

KNIGHTON, WILLIAM LEE, Instructor of Mathematics. B.A., Louisiana State 
University; M.S., Southeastern Louisiana University. 

KNOX, WILMA J., Part-time Associate Professor of Psychology. B. A., M. A., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

KOEPPEL, JOHN CARRINGTON, Honors Associate Professor of Psychology. B.S., 
M.A., Memphis State University; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 

KOLIN, PHILLIP CHARLES, Associate Professor of English. B.S., Chicago State 
University; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

KRECKER, EDWARD CHARLES, Associate Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., 
University of Kentucky; B.A., M.D., University of Louisville. 

KRUSE, THOMAS LEE, Associate Professor of Social Work. B. A., University of Kan- 
sas; M.S.W., Washington University; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

KURIGER, LINDA LEWIS, Librarian I, Microform Librarian, Cook Library. B.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi. 



362/Faculty 

LACKEY, JOHN EDD, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Vocational Education. 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Southern Il- 
linois. 

LADNER, JAMES LARRY, Assistant Professor of Athletic Administration and 
Coaching. B.S., Louisiana College; M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi; doc- 
toral study, Indiana University and University of Alabama. 

LANCASTER, EDITH MITCHELL, Assistant Professor of Family Life Services. B.S., 
M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

LANDRY, MARY CLAIRE, Assistant Professor of Institution Administration. B.S., 
University of Southwestern Louisiana; M.S., University of Nebraska, Lincoln. 

LANDRY, ROBERT JAMES, Assistant Professor of Geography and Area Develop- 
ment. B.A., M.S., University of Mississippi. 

LANE, CARL HAGAN, Captain, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science. B.S., 
M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

LANMON, LINDA FRANCES, Instructional Developer, Teaching-Learning Resources 
Center, and Associate Professor of Library Science. B.A., M.S., East Texas State 
College; Ph.D., East Texas State University. 

LANMON, MARVIN LEE, JR., Associate Professor of Industrial and Vocational 
Education. B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., East Texas State University. 

LARSEN, JAMES BOUTON, Associate Professor of Biology. B.A., Kalamazoo Col- 
lege; M.S., Ph.D., University of Miami. 

LARSON, JAMES WILLIAM, JR., Chairman of Department of Physical Education 
and Professor of Physical Education. B.S., M.S., Ed.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

LASATER, ALICE ELIZABETH, Associate Professor of English. B.A., University of 
Chattanooga; M.A., Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

LAUGHLIN, JEANNINE LACKEY, Assistant Professor of Library Science. B.S., 
M.S., Ed.S., University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, Indiana Universi- 
ty. 

LAYNE, CHRISTOPHER COOPER, Associate Professor of Psychology. B. A., College 
of William and Mary; M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama. 

LEA, JAMES FRANKLIN, Associate Professor of Political Science. B. A., Southeastern 
Louisiana University; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

LEBSACH, SHARON ELAINE, Assistant Professor of Music. B.A., B.M., M.A., 
University of Northern Colorado. 

LEE, BILLY EUGENE, Director of USM-KAFB and Associate Professor of Research 
and Foundations, Gulf Coast. B.S., M.Ed., Mississippi State University; Ed.D., 
University of Mississippi. 

LEE, MARY ANN BYRNE, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B. A., 
Ursuline College, M.A., Ph.D., Purdue University. 

LeFLORE, LARRY, Instructor of Criminal Justice. B.A., William Carey College; M.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, Florida State University. 

LEHRER, NOEL, Instructor of Speech and Hearing Sciences. B.S., Emerson College; 
M.A., University of Alabama. 

LEHRER, SARA KAY STEINBERG, Instructor of Speech Communication. B.S., 
Emerson of College; M.A., University of Alabama. 

LEONARD, REX LEE, Assosciate Professor of Research and Foundations. B.S., 
United States Naval Academy; M.S., Texas A & I University; Ph.D., University of 
Northern Colorado. 



Faculty/363 

LESTER, THERESA ANNETTE, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Pro- 
gram. B.S., University of Mississippi; M.N., University of Florida. 

LEWIS, CAROLYN McKEE, Associate Professor of Business Education. B.S., M.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., University of Houston. 

LEWIS, EDDIE MILEY, Associate Professor of Economics. B.S., M.B.A., University 
of Southern Mississippi; D.B.A., Mississippi State University. 

LEWIS, JANE EDEL, Instructor of English. B.A., Bob Jones University; M.A., doc- 
toral study, University of Mississippi. 

LI, CHEN-TUAN, Associate Professor of Economics. B.A., National Chingchi Universi- 
ty; M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida. 

LI, HUON, Professor of Physics and Astronomy. B.S., National Central University, 
Nanking, China; M.S., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. 

LINDECAMP, DAVID PAUL, Assistant Professor of Business, Natchez. B.A., 
Washington and Lee University; M.A., Louisiana State University; J.D., 
Washington University; doctoral study, Texas A & M University. 

LIPSCOMB, JOHN W. JR., Assistant Professor of Industrial Technology. B.S.E.E., 
B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Louisiana State University; doctoral study, University of 
Mississippi. P.E. 

LOK, WALTER JAMES, Chairman of Department of Allied Arts and Professor of 
Allied Arts. B.Des., M.Des., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of 
Alabama. 

LONG, LORA ALCORN, Associate Professor of Library Science. B.A., M.S., Kansas 
State Teachers College; M.L.S., Rutgers University; Ed.D., University of Mississip- 
pi. 

LOPEZ, RICARDO E., Associate Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., M.D., 
Tulane University. 

LOVE, DALE KELLY, Associate Director of Bands and Assistant Professor of Music. 
B.M., M.M., University of Mississippi. 

2 LOWE, JAMES DOUGLAS, JR., Chairman of Department of Psychology and Pro- 
fessor of Psychology. B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama. 

LOYD, DOLLY DIANE PURVIS, Instructor of Marketing. B.S., M.B. A., University 
of Southern University. 

LUNAN, MACKENZIE A., Director of Records and Admissions and Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Research and Foundations. B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., Ph.D., 
University of Southern Mississippi. 

McCAIN, DOUGLAS CLAYTON, Associate Professor of Chemistry. B.S., Purdue 
University; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. 

MCCARTHY, MARY MARGARET, Chairman of Department of Institution Ad- 
ministration and Professor of Institution Administration. B.S., M.A., University of 
Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

McCARTY, KENNETH GRAHAM, JR., Associate Professor of History. B.S., M. A., 
University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Duke University. 

McCLELLAND, KEENER DELANEY, Associate Professor of Speech and Hearing 
Sciences. B.A., M.A., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., University of Florida. 

McCORMICK, CHARLES LEWIS, III, Associate Professor of Polymer Science. B.S., 
Millsaps College; Ph.D., University of Florida. 

McCRARY, RONALD GENE, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. B. A., Central 
Missouri State University; Ph.D., University of Missouri. 



364/FacuIty 

McCRAW, HARRY WELLS, Associate Professor of English. B.S., Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology; M.A., Ph.D., Tulane University. 

McCREERY, RONALD, Associate Professor of Music and Director of Orchestral Ac- 
tivities. B.S. in Ed., Bowling Green State University; M.M., Kent State University. 

McDOWELL, JACK EDWARD, Instructional Television Coordinator, Teaching- 
Learning Resources Center, and Instructor of Library Science. B.A., Mississippi 
State University; M.A., University of New Orleans. 

McGOWEN, DOUGLAS KNEALE, Assistant Professor of Construction and Architec- 
tural Technology. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

McGREW, WYNEMA, Chairman of Department of Nursing-Continuing Education, and 
Associate Professor of Nursing. B.S.N., University of Tennessee; M.N., University 
of Washington; Ed.D., Mississippi State University. 

McHENRY, CHARLOTTE ANN SWALES, Assistant Professor of Nursing- 
Baccalaureate Program. B.S.N., University of Mississippi School of Nursing; M.S., 
University of Maryland. 

McKEE, JESSE OSCAR, Professor of Geography. B.S., Clarion State College; M.A., 
Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

McMANIGAL, SHIRLEY ANN, Chairman of Department of Medical Technology and 
Assistant Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., Arkansas State University; M.S., 
Ph.D., University of Oklahoma. 

McMILLEN, NEIL RAYMOND, Professor of History. B.A., M.A., University of 
Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

McNINCH, GEORGE HAAS, Director of Developmental Reading Center and Professor 
of Curriculum and Instruction. B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.Ed., 
University of Mississippi; Ed.D., University of Georgia. 

McPHAIL, JAMES HAROLD, Chairman of Department of Educational Administra- 
tion and Supervision and Professor of Educational Administration. B.S., M.ED., 
University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., Boston University. 

McQUISTON, JAMES MERWYN, JR., Assistant Professor of Economics. B.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, University of Virginia. 

MADDOX, VICTOR ANDREW, Assistant Director of Bureau of Institutional Research 
and Assistant Professor of Research and Foundations. B.A., California State 
University, Long Beach; M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

MAGEE, DENNIS ELTON, Associate Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., M.S., 
Mississippi University Medical Center. 

MALLETT, BOBBIE JEAN, Librarian II, Music Resources Center Librarian. B.A., 
Jackson State University; M.L.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

MANLY, THERON W., Director of Division of Education and Psychology and 
Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, Gulf Coast. B.S., Howard Col- 
lege; M.A., Ed.D., University of Alabama. 

MARCHMAN, DAVID AUSTIN, Assistant Professor of Construction and Architec- 
tural Technology. B.B.C., M.B.C., University of Florida; doctoral study, Universi- 
ty of Mississippi. 

MARCIANI, LOUIS MARIO, Chairman of Department of Intramural-Recreational 
Sports and Instructor of Intramural-Recreational Sports. B.A., Morris Harvey Col- 
lege; M.S., University of Bridgeport. 

MARKWALDER, WINSTON E., Associate Professor of Special Lducation, Ciulf 
Coast. B.A., Drake University, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. 



Faculty/365 

MARQUARDT, RONALD GENE, Associate Professor of Political Science. B.S., M.S., 
Kansas State College; Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

MARTIN, BILLY JOE, Associate Professor of Biology. B.S., M.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Rice University. 

MARTIN, MODENA, Instructor of Economics. B.A., University of Mississippi; M.A., 
University of Southern Mississippi. 

MARTIN, PATSY J. THARPE, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Pro- 
gram. B.S.N. , M.S.N., St. Louis University. 

MARX, CHARLES ALVIN, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice. LL.B., Jackson 
Law School; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.Ed., Mississippi College; 
advanced legal study, Case Western Reserve University and British Academy of 
Forensic Science. 

MASZTAL, NANCY, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, and Coor- 
dinator of Programs in Elementary Education, Gulf Coast. B.A., Florida State 
University; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Miami. 

MATHIS, GEORGE LOUIS, Assistant Professor of Construction and Architectural 
Technology. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, 
University of Mississippi. 

MATTHEWS, JACK GIBSON, Assistant Professor of Science Education. B.S.E., 
Henderson State College; M.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., Ohio State Univer- 
sity. 

MAY, KISKA BURLESON, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. 
B.S.N. , M.S.M., University of Alabama, Birmingham. 

MAYS, SHIRLEY GREEN, Instructor of Business Education. B.S., Alcorn State 
University; M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi. 

MEADE, JAMES WALTER, JR., Associate Professor of Art. B.S., M.A., East Ten- 
nessee State University; M.F.A., University of Georgia. 

MERRIFIELD, VERNON EUGENE, Associate Professor of Art. B.F.A., M.A., 
University of Alabama. 

MIDDLEBROOKS, BOBBY LYNN, Associate Professor of Microbiology. B.A., Rice 
University; Ph.D., University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. 

MIKA, JOSEPH JOHN, Assistant to the Dean, School of Library Service, and Assistant 
Professor of Library Science. B.A., M.L.S., doctoral study, University of Pitts- 
burg. 

MILKENT, MARLENE MARIE, Associate Professor of Science Education. B.S., 
California State College; Ph.D., University of Texas. 

MILLER, KAY JUANITA, Librarian III, Associate Director for Public Services, Cook 
Library, and Assistant Professor of Library Science. B.S., Mississippi College; 
M.L.S., Louisiana State University. 

MILLER, WALLACE DYETT, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. A.B., 
Southwest Missouri State College; M.A., Northeast Missouri State College; Ph.D., 
Southern Illinois University. 

MILNER, LOUELLA GILL, Associate Professor of Home Economics Education and 
Coordinator of Graduate Studies. B.S., M.S., Ed.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

MOORE, BOBBY DEAN, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.S., 
Lamar State College of Technology; M.Ed., Ed.D., North Texas State University. 

MOORE, FRANK R., Assistant Professor of Biology. B. A., Ohio Wesleyan University; 
M.S., Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., Clemson College. 



366/Faculty 

MOORE, JOE DENTON, Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Industrial 
Technology. B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S.E., State College of 
Arkansas; doctoral study, Texas A & M University. 

MOORE, JOHN RICHARD, Assistant Professor of Science Education and Museum 
Curator. B.S.Ed., M.Ed., University of Florida; Ph.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

MOORE, MARK EUGENE, Assistant Professor of Music, B.S., University of Illinois; 
M.M., Ohio State University. 

MOORE, PATRICK MICHAEL, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. B.S., 
M.E., University of Southern Mississippi. 

MOORE, ROY NEWTON, Chairman of Department of Management and Professor of 
Management. B.S., M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University 
of Alabama. 

MOORMAN, CHARLES WICKLIFFE, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Pro- 
fessor of English. A.B., Kenyon College; M.A., Ph.D., Tulane University; Gug- 
genheim Fellow 

MOORMAN, RUTH GLINDMEYER, Honors Associate Professor of Foreign 
Languages. A.B., Agnes Scott College; M.S., University of Cincinnati; Ph.D., 
Louisiana State University. 

MORELAND, WILBUR LAFE, Assistant Professor of Music. B.A., M.A., University 
of Northern Colorado. 

MORGAN, JEROLD JOSEPH, Director of School of Professional Accountancy and 
Professor of Accounting. B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.B.A., 
University of Houston; Ph.D., University of Alabama. C.P.A. 

MOTT, DONALD RAY, Assistant Professor of Radio, Television, and Film. B.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., M.F.A., University of New Orleans. 

MOTTLEY, REED RICKMAN, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.A., 
Catawba College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Georgia. 

MULLICAN, LARRY DUANE, Assistant Professor of Allied Arts. B. A., University of 
North Iowa; M.A., University of Colorado. 

MULLINS, JOE BARRY, Professor of Music and Director of Bands. B.Mus., 
Southwestern at Memphis; M.M., George Peabody College; Ed.D., University of Il- 
linois. 

MULLINS, VIRGINIA LOU WILLIAMS, Instructor of Mathematics. B.S., Northeast 
Louisiana College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

MURPHY, SHIRLEY, Librarian III, Senior Reference Librarian, Cook Library. B.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; M.L.S., Louisiana State University. 

MYERS, MILNER H., JR., Director, Instructional Resource Program, School of Nurs- 
ing and Librarian III. B.S., M.S., Ed.S., University of Southern Mississippi; doc- 
toral candidate, University of Mississippi. 

NAGURNEY, FRANK KLEIN, Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Statistics. 
B.A., Rider College; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., University of 
Pittsburgh. 

NEELEY, MARY ANN, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Continuing Education Pro- 
gram. B.S.N. , Mississippi University for Women; M.S.N., Medical College of 
Georgia. 

NEIDLINGER, HERMANN HEINRICH, Assistant Professor of Polymer Science. 
Ph.D., Johannes-Gutenberg University. 



Faculty/367 

NEUMANN, EDITHA SCHLANSTEDT, Chairman of Department of Foreign 
Languages and Professor of Foreign Languages. B.A., University of Berlin; 
M.S.W., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Tulane University. 

NISSAN, EDWARD, Associate Professor of Economics and Research Associate, Bureau 
of Business Research. B.S., University of Kansas; Ph.D., Texas A & M University. 

NOBLE, ELEANOR FLINT, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B. A., 
M.A., Ph.D., Arizona State University. 

NORRIS, DONALD EARL, JR., Professor of Biology. B.S., Indiana State University; 
M.S., Ph.D., Tulane University. 

NORSWORTHY, JOHN McCALL, Associate Professor of Special Education. B.S., 
M.Ed., Mississippi State University; Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

ODOM, MACKIE EDWARD, Librarian II, Government Documents Librarian, Cook 
Library. B.A., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.L.S., Louisiana State 
University. 

ODOM, WILLIAM McBRIDE, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. B.A., Loui- 
siana State University; Ph.D., Tulane University. 

OEHMS, GLENN EDWARD, Tutor of English. B. A., University of Southern Mississip- 
pi. 

OLSEN, BOB GILLHAM, Assistant Professor of Adult Education. B.A., M.A., 
University of North Carolina; Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 

ORANGE, LINWOOD ELDEN, Professor of English. A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Duke 
University 

OSADCHUK, WALTER BORIS, Associate Professor of Music. B.Mus., M.Mus., 

Northwestern University. 
O'TOOLE, WILLIAM M., Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology and 

Counselor Education. B.S., Loyola University; Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
OVERSTREET, ROBIN M., Assistant Professor of Biology, Gulf Coast Research 

Laboratory. B.S., University of Oregon; M.S., Ph.D., University of Miami. 
OWEN, DAVID McINTOSH, Associate Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., M.D., 

University of Mississippi School of Medicine. 
OXFORD, EDWIN PAUL, Associate Professor of Mathematics. B.S., M.S., Louisiana 

Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., New Mexico State University. 
OZERDEN, HALIL, Associate Professor of Psychology, Gulf Coast. B.A., Huntingdon 

College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
PADGETT, MARY JEAN, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. 

B.S.N. , Mississippi College; M.S.N., University of Alabama. 
PANKO, THOMAS RALPH, Associate Professor of Sociology. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 

Louisiana State University. 
PANTIN, MICHAEL A., Assistant to the Dean and Instructor of Research and Founda- 
tions, Gulf Coast. B.S.E., M.Ed., Delta State University. 
PARISH, GERALDINE, Assistant Professor of Social Work. B.A., William Carey Col- 
lege; M.S.W., Tulane University. 
PARKER, HUGH, JAMES, Instructor of Accounting. B.S., M.S., University of 

Southern Mississippi. C.P.A. 
PARKER, JOSEPH BALFOUR, Professor of Political Science. B.A., M.A., Louisiana 

State University; Ph.D., Tulane University. 
PARKS, LOUIS HAMMETT, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Natchez. 

B.S., M.B.A., Mississippi State University. 



368/Faculty 

PATTERSON, WILLIAM E., JR., Part-time Associate Professor of Psychology. A. B., 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama. 

PAULSON, OSCAR LAWRENCE, JR., Chairman of Department of Geology and Pro- 
fessor of Geology. B.S., M.S., Mississippi State University; Ph.D., Louisiana State 
University. 

PAWLOWSKI, ROBERT STANLEY, Chairman of Department of English and Pro- 
fessor of English. B.A., B.S., Moorhead State Teacher's College (Minnesota); 
M.A., State University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Denver. 

PEDDICORD, HERSCHEL QUINTON, JR., Associate Professor of Curriculum and 
Instruction. B.A., Presbyterian College; M.Ed., University of South Carolina; 
Ed.D., Duke University. 

PEDDICORD, PAUL WALLACE, Chairman of Department of Research and Founda- 
tions and Professor of Research and Foundations. B.A., Furman University; M.- 
Ed., University of Houston; Ed.D., Duke University. 

PEEBLES, PATRICIA HOWARD, Associate Professor of Microbiology. B.S., Central 
Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., University of Texas. 

PENDERGRASS, ROY CALVIN, Instructor of Journalism. B.S., M.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

PERRY, FLORENCE LIGHTSEY, Librarian II, Assistant Curator for de Grummond 
Collection, McCain Library. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

PESSONEY, GEORGE FRANCIS, III, Honors Professor of Biology. B.S., M. A., Sam 
Houston State College; Ph.D., University of Texas. 

PHILLIPS, HENRY STANLEY, JR., Instructor of English. B.S., M.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

PHILLIPS, LARRY WAYNE, Instructor of Criminal Justice, Gulf Coast. B.S., M.S., 
doctoral study, University of Southern Mississippi. 

PIERCE, WILLIE LEE, JR., Acting Chairman of Department of Adult Education and 
Associate Professor of Adult Education. B.S.E., M.Ed., Delta State University; 
Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 

PINSON, JAMES WESLEY, Professor of Chemistry. B.S., William Carey College; 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Mississippi. 

PLUE, WILLIAM VILAS, Chairman of Department of Special Education and Pro- 
fessor of Special Education. B.S., M.Ed., Lewis and Clark College; Ed.D., Univer- 
sity of Oregon. 

POIRIER, WILLIAM HARVEY, Professor of Art. B.S., Eastern Michigan University; 
M.A., Ed.S., George Peabody College; Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

POLK, NOEL EARL, Assistant Professor of English. B. A., M. A., Mississippi College; 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

PORTER, SHARON DEANNA, Instructor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. B.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; advanced study, Texas Women's University. 

POSEY, BETTY DRAKE, Librarian III, Periodicals Librarian, Cook Library. B.S., 
M.S., Auburn University; M.L.S., George Peabody College. 

POSEY, LLOYD FRANKLIN, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.S., Universi- 
ty of Alabama; M.A., Ed.D., George Peabody College. 

POSEY, RODERICK BURL, Assistant Professor of Accounting. B.S., M.S., University 
of Southern Mississippi. 

POULOS, ROGER DALE, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Gulf Coast. 
B.S., M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 



Faculty/369 

POUNCEY, CAROLYN ANN, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. 

B.S., Northwestern State University; M.S.N., Texas Women's University. 
POUND, GOMER JEFFREY, Professor of Music. Mus.B., Michigan State University; 

M.Mus.Ed., Ph.D. in M.Ed., Florida State University. 
PRENSHAW, ERIC RICHARD, Assistant to the Vice President for Academic Affairs 

and Associate Professor of Music. B.M., M.M., Northwestern University; D.M.A., 

University of Texas. 
TRENSHAW, PEGGY WHITMAN, Honors Professor of English. B.M., M.A., 

Mississippi College; Ph.D., University of Texas. 
PRESLEY, JERRY MAX, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Natchez. B.A., Florida 

Southern College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Mississippi. 
PRESSER, WILLIAM HENRY, Professor of Music. A.B., Alma College; Mus.M., 

University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Rochester. 
PRITCHETT, LINDA ANN, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Continuing Education. 

B.S.N.,M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia. 
PRITCHETT, THOMAS KEITH, Assistant Professor of Marketing. B.B.A., Emory 

University; M.A., Georgia State University; D.B.A., Florida State University. 
PROBST, CHARLES H., Dean of Student Services and Associate Professor of Counsel- 
ing Psychology and Counselor Education. B.S., M.A., University of Southern 

Mississippi; Ed.D., University of Mississippi. 
PUCKETT, JAMES FRANKLIN, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. B.A., 

Vanderbilt University; M.D., University of Mississippi School of Medicine. 
PUCKETT, THOMAS FRANKLIN, Professor of Medical Technology. B. A., University 

of California; M.S., University of Colorado; M.D., University of California. 
PURVIS, JOHNNY RAY, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.A., 

M.A., Northwestern State College; Ed.D., Northeast Louisiana University. 
PYE, WALLACE CLARK, Associate Professor of Mathematics. B.S., M.S., Louisiana 

State University; Ph.D., Texas Tech University. 
QUARNSTROM, ISAAC BLAINE, Chairman of Department of Theatre Arts and Pro- 
fessor of Theatre Arts. B.S., M.A., Brigham Young University; Ph.D., Ohio State 

University. 
RAGSDALE, DANA OUGH, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M., University of 

Denver; M.M., University of Hartford. 
RAINS, OHREN WILLIS, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.S., 

Arkansas Agricultural and Mechanical College; M.Ed., Alabama Polytechnic In- 
stitute; Ed.D., Oklahoma State University. 
RAMKE, RONALD GEORGE, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

B.A., Union College; B.D., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State Univer- 
sity. 
RANDOLPH, DANIEL LEE, Professor of Counseling Psychology and Counselor 

Education. B.S., University of West Virginia; M.ED., Marquette University; 

Ph.D., Florida State University. 
RAYBORN, GRAYSON HANKS, Professor of Physics. B.S., Rensselaer; Ph.D., 

University of Florida. 
REDWOOD, NELL T., Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. B.S.N. 

Ed., M.S., Case Western Reserve University; advanced study, University of 

Maryland, Rutgers University. 
REED, CAROLYN, Learning Center Coordinator and Librarian II. B.S., M.Ed., 

University of Southern Mississippi. 



370/Faculty 

REED, RONALD EDWARDS, Major, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science. 
B.S., M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 

REES, JOCELYN MARIE, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. B.A., 
University of Southwestern Louisiana; M.A., Catholic University of America; 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

REEVES, JERRY B., Director of Jackson County Resident Center and Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Business Administration, Gulf Coast. B.S., M.B.A., University of 
Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, University of Mississippi. 

REHAK, EDWARD MATHEW, Assistant Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., 
Loyola College; M.D., Georgetown University. 

REISELT, RICHARD WAYNE, Associate Professor of Athletic Administration and 
Coaching. B.A., Augustana College; M.S., Indiana University; D.A., Middle Ten- 
nessee State University. 

REY, STEPHEN VAN, Assistant Director and Instructor, Intramural-Recreational 
Sports. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

RHODES, ROBERT CLYDE, Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences. B.S., Col- 
orado State University; M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., University of Pitts- 
burgh. 

RICHARDSON, THOMAS JOSEPH, Associate Professor of English. B. A., University 
of Southern Mississippi; M.A., Univeristy of Alabama; Ph.D., Vanderbilt Universi- 
ty. 

RICHESON, MARLENE BEDSOLE, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate 
Program. B.S.N., University of Alabama; M.S., University of North Carolina. 

RICHMOND, MARK GLENN, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., Indiana University. 

RIMES, BRADY RAY, Instructor of Computer Science and Statistics and systems Pro- 
grammer. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

RINDFLEISCH, KENT ROY, Assistant Professor of Recreation. B.S., University of 
Utah; M.S., Indiana State University. 

RITTER, WILLIE EDWARD, Captain, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military 
Science. B.S., Virginia State College. 

RITZLER, BARRY ALAN, Director of Psychology Clinic and Professor of Psychology. 
B.A., Manchester College; M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University. 

ROBERTS, WILLIAM MARVIN, JR., Chairman of Department of Geography and 
Area Development and Professor of Geography. B.A., M.A., University of Iowa; 
Ph.D., University of Washington. 

ROBERTSON, COSBY WARREN, Associate Professor of Theatre Arts. B.S., Universi- 
ty of Tennessee; M.F.A., Tulane University; Ph.D., Florida State University. 

ROGERS, HILDA LYNELL BRISTER, Assistant Professor of Family Life Services. 
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; graduate study, Eastern Kentucky 
State College. 

ROSS, STEPHEN T., Associate Professor of Biology. B.A., University of California, 
Los Angeles; M.A., California State University, Fullerton; Ph.D., University of 
South Florida. 

ROSSO, SAMUEL WILFORD, Associate Professor of Biology. B.A., University of 
Southern Mississippi; M.S., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., Washington Univer- 
sity, St. Louis. 



Faculty/371 

RUSH, GARY SHERRIEL, Assistant Dean, College of Education and Psychology, and 
Associate Professor of Educational Administration and Supervision. B.A., Loui- 
siana College; M.Ed., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

RYAN, MARGARET WILSON, Associate Professor of Art. B.A., M.Ed., Florida 
Atlantic University; Ed.D., University of Florida. 

RUSK, EDWIN THOMAS, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy. B.S., Case 
Institue of Technology; doctoral study, University of Florida. 

SALINAS, YSIDRO, Program Adviser and Assistant Professor of Construction and Ar- 
chitectural Technology. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi 

SANCHEZ, RICHARD XAVIER, Associate Professor of Music. B. A., Tulane Univer- 
sity; M.M., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

SATTERFIELD, ELLEN DRAKE, Librarian II, Assistant Acquisition Librarian, Cook 
Library. B.A., Southeastern Massachusetts University; M.L.S., State University of 
New York at Albany. 

SAUCIER, GENE DUANE, Dean of Admissions and Special Academic Services and 
Assistant Professor of Adult Education. B.S., M.S., Ed.D., University of Southern 

Mississippi. 
SAXON, WILLIAM WALKER, JR., Professor of Social Work. B.A., Mississippi State 

University; M.S.W., University of Tennessee; Ed.D., University of Alabama. 
SCANIO, TOM SALVATO, Associate Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences. B. A., 

University of South Florida; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University. 
SCARBOROUGH, WILLIAM KAUFFMAN, Professor of History. A. B., University of 

North Carolina; M.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
SCHAUB, MARY TURPEN, Assistant Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences. B. A., 

M.S., University of Wyoming. 
SCHEETZ, RAYMOND WAYNE, Professor of Biology. B.S., Philadephia College of 

Pharmacy and Science; M.S., Ph.D., University of Delaware. 
SCHMIDT, WILLIAM THEODORE, Assistant Professor of History. B.A., M.A., 

Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
SCHOELL, WILLIAM FREDERICK, III. Professor of Marketing. B.S., Louisiana 

State University, New Orleans; M.B.A, Ph.D., University of Arkansas. 
SCHURFRANZ, BARBARA DeMARCO, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. 

B.A., M.A., Smith College; M.A., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., Louisiana State 

University, Baton Rouge. 
SCOTT, RANDALL, Assistant Professor of Special Education. B.A., William Carey 

College; M.A., S.Ed., George Peabody College for Teachers. 
SEVER, THOMAS LEE, Instructor of Sociology and Anthropology. B.A., Harris 

Teachers College; M.A., Sangamon State University. 
SEYMOUR, HENRY A., Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Statistics. B.S., 

M.Ed., M.S , Ed.D., Mississippi State University. 
SEYMOUR, RAYMOND BENEDICT, Professor of Polymer Science. B.S., M.S., 

University of New Hampshire; Ph.D., University of Iowa. 
SHAFER, BILL WAYNE, Director of Student Counseling and Associate Professor of 

Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education. B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., East Texas 

State University. 
SHANDS, VIRGINIA PRICE, Assistant Professor of Speech Communication. B.S., 

M.Ed., Mississippi State University; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
SHARKEY, PAUL WILLIAM, Chairman of Department of Philosophy and Religion 

and Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion. B.A., California State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 



372/Faculty 

SHARP, BETTY SUE HUMPHRIES, Acting Chairman of Department of En- 
vironmental Design and Associate Professor of Environmental Design. B.A., M.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi. 

SHATUS, ERWIN L., Part-time Associate Professor of Psychology. A. B., University of 
Miami; M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

SIMMONS, HENRY LAMAR, Librarian II, Assistant Curator for Mississippiana, Mc- 
Cain Library. B.S., M.L.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

SIMS, JAMES HYLBERT, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Professor of 
English. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida. 

SIRMON, WILLIAM ARNOLD, Chairman of Department of Finance and General 
Business and Professor of Finance. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 
D.B.A., Mississippi State University. 

SISEMORE, DAVID ALLEN, Associate Professor of Psychology. B. A., M. A., Ph.D., 
University of Arkansas. 

SISEMORE, MARY BABB STURDIVANT, Assistant Professor of Nursing- 
Baccalaureate Program. B.S.N. , University of Mississippi School of Nursing; M.N., 
Emory University. 

SITTON, LILLIAN RANGE, Assistant Professor of Psychology. B.S., East Tennessee 
State University; M.A., Georgia State University. 

SKATES, CRAIG BARNWELL, Instructor of English. B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., 
University of Southern Mississippi. 

SKATES, JOHN RAY, JR., Chairman of Department of History and Professor of 
History. B.B.A., University of Mississippi; M.A., Ph.D., Mississippi State Univer- 
sity. 

SLAY, BILLY BORDEN, Professor of Physical Education and Coordinator of 
Graduate Studies. B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., Louisiana 
State University. 

SMITH, BROOKS EUGENE, Director of Division of Business Administration and 
Associate Professor of Business Administration, Gulf Coast. B.S., M.B.A., Univer- 
sity of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Alabama. 

SMITH, BYRON COLEMAN, Professor of Biology. B.S., Indiana State University; 
M.A., DePauw University; Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

SMITH, JOHN LARRY, Associate Professor of Medical Technology. B.S., University 
of Oklahoma; M.D., Tulane University School of Medicine. 

SMITH, MARY COLETTE, Chairman and Professor of Nursing-Graduate Program. 
B.S., College of Saint Rose; M.S.N. , Catholic University of America; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland. 

SMITH, THOMAS DILLARD, Associate Professor of Marketing. B.B.A., M.B.A., 
Ph.D., University of Mississippi. 

SMITH, WILLIAM CURTIS, JR., Assistant Professor of Marketing. B.S., Florida 
State University; M.B.A., Florida State University. 

SNYDER, ROBERT THOMAS, Professor of Psychology. B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania 
State University; Ph.D., Catholic University of America. 

SOMMERS, PAULINE R., Associate Professor of Nursing-Graduate Program. B.S.N. , 
Louisiana State University; M.S.N., Wayne State University; Ed.D., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

SONNIER, ISADORE LEON, Professor of Science Education. A.B., University of 
Southwestern Louisiana; A.M., Louisiana State University; Ed.D., Colorado State 
College. 



Faculty/373 

SOUTHERLAND, ARTHUR RAY, Associate Professor of Educational Administration 

and Supervision. B.M.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D., East Texas State Teachers College. 
SPEAIRS, FLORENCE ANN, Librarian II, Assistant Cataloger, Cook Library. B.A., 

M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 
STAMPER, ANITA MILLER. Assistant Professor of Environmental Design. A.B., 

Morehead State University; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral 

study, University of Tennessee. 
STAMPER, DONALD REXFORD, Associate Professor of English. B.A., Morehead 

State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Arkansas. 
STANLEY, DAVID JAMES, II, Assistant Professor of Art. B.A., M.A., Louisiana 

State University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
STANTON, ORA L. W., Associate Professor of Social Work. B. A., Tougaloo College; 

M.S.W., Indiana University; D.S. W., University of Utah. 
STEARNS, JANE ALICE. Professor of Social Work. B.A., University of Nebraska, 

Lincoln; M.S.W., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; D.S.W., Washington 

University, St. Louis. 
STEGENGA, MARTIN, Professor of Management. B.S., M.S., Mississippi State 

University; D.B.A., Indiana University. 
STEPKO, GEORGE, JR., Assistant Professor of Geography and Area Development. 

B.S., M.A. in Ed., Murray State College; doctoral study, University of Pittsburgh. 
STEVENS, JOANNE Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology and Counselor 

Education and Counselor in Sludent Counseling. B.S.E., State College of Arkansas, 

Conway; M.S., Ed.D., East Texas State University. 
STEWART, DAVID KEITH, Professor of Educational Administration and Supervision. 

B.A., Central Missouri University; M.A., Columbia University; Ed.D., New York 

University. 
STEWART, RICHARD FRANCIS, Captain, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military 

Science. B.A., Lawrence University. 
STITH, JAMES LOGAN, Associate Professor of Medical Technology. A.B., M.D., 

George Washington University. 
'STOCKS, PETER KONRAD, Chairman of Department of Microbiology and Professor 

of Microbiology. B.S., Millsaps College; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
STODDARD, GAYLE RAE, Instructor of Microbiology and Chief Cytotechnologist. 

B.S., Northwestern Oklahoma State University; M.S., University of Southern 

Mississippi. 
STOKES, COLEEN LEE DOOLEY, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Pro- 
gram. B.S.N. , M.S.N., University of Florida. 
STORY, LLOYD EDWARD, JR., Associate Professor of Science Education. B.S., 

Morehead State College; M.A., Murray State University; Ph.D., University of 

Southern Mississippi. 
STOVALL, JUDY MARIE, Assistant Professor of Nursing-Baccalaureate Program. 

B.S.N. , Tuskegee Institute, School of Nursing; M.S.N., University of Southern 

Mississippi. 
STRINGER, GARY ALLEN, Associate Professor of English, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Oklahoma. 
STURGIS, DANIEL KENNETH, Associate Professor of Counseling Psychology and 

Counselor Education. B.A., Central Missouri State University; M.Ed., Ph.D., 

University of Missouri. 



374/Faculty 

SUGGS, RONNIE J., Instructor of Physics and Astronomy. B.S., University of 

Southern Mississippi; M.S., Clemson University. 
SULLIVAN, WARREN CLAYTON, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

B.A., Mississippi College; B.D., Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 
SUNDEEN, DANIEL ALVIN, Associate Professor of Geology. B.A., University of 

New Hampshire; A.M., Ph.D., Indiana University. 
SWAIN, LOUIS MARTIN, Instructor of Chemistry. B.A., Central College (Iowa); 

M.S., Kansas State University, Manhattan. 
SWITZER, JAMES REGINALD, Professor of Health and Safety Education. B.S., 

University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Louisiana State University; Ed.D., 

University of Texas. 
SZALWINSKI, AMBROSE A., Colonel, U.S.A., Chairman of Department of Military 

Science and Professor of Military Science. B.A., St. Mary's University (Texas); 

M.A., University of Oklahoma. 
TABOR, BRUCE A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. B.S., University of 

Southern Mississippi. 
TARDY, CHARLES HOLMAN, Assistant Professor of Speech Communication. B. A., 

Mississippi State University; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Iowa. 
TAYLOR, CELESTIAN JOSEPH, Assistant Athletic Director, Head Baseball Coach, 

and Instructor of Athletic Administration and Coaching. B.S., M.A., University of 

Southern Mississippi. 
TAYLOR, GLORIA BRUEMMER, Associate Professor of Business Education B.S., 

M.S., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
2 TAYLOR, WILLIAM BANKS, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice. B.A., M.A., 

University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of London; and advanced 

legal study, British Academy of Forensic Sciences. 
THAGARD, OLIVER BOGGS, Instructor of Sociology. A.B., Samford University; 

M.A., University of Southern Mississippi. 
THAMES, SHELBY FRELAND, Vice President for Administration and Regional Cam- 
puses and Professor of Polymer Science. B.S.,M.S., University of Southern 

Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 
( THARPE, JAC LYNDON, Honors Professor of English. B.A., M.A., University of 

Tennessee; Ph.D., Harvard University. 
'THOMAS, E. NAYMOND, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M.Ed., University of 

Louisville; M.M., University of Colorado. 
THOMAS, LISA GAY, Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Statistics, Gulf 

Coast. B.S., M.S., Mississippi State University. 
THOMAS, ROBERT CHARLES, Chairman of Department of Speech and Hearing 

Sciences and Associate Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences. B.A., Texas 

Christian University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
THOMAS, ROBERT PAYNE, Assistant Professor of Library Science. B.S., Oklahoma 

State University; M.S., Southern Illinois University; doctoral study, East Texas 

University. 
THOMPSON, CHARLES EDWIN, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction 

and Coordinator of Programs in Secondary Education, Gulf Coast. A.B., 

Allegheny College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 
THOMPSON, KAROLYN SHIELDS, Librarian II, Assistant Reference Librarian and 

Interlibrary Loan Coordinator, Cook Library. B.S., Jackson State University; 

M.S.L.S., University of Illinois. 



Faculty/375 

THRASH, JOE BARHAM, JR., Honors Associate Professor of Mathematics. B.S., 
M.S., Lamar State College; Ph.D., Texas Tech University. 

THRASH, LOIS ANN LEVENTHAL, Assistant Professor of Music. B. A., University 
of Massachusetts; M.M., New England Conservatory of Music. 

THROWER, EDGAR ANSON, Instructor of Accounting. B.S. in B. A., M.S., Universi- 
ty of Southern Mississippi. C.P.A. 

TOLIVER, VIRGINIA FRANCES, Librarian II, Assistant Reference Librarian, and 
Computerized Reference Coordinator. Cook Library. B.A., Jackson State Universi- 
ty; M.S.L.S., University of Illinois. 

TOOM, PAUL MARVIN, Professor of Chemistry. B. A., Central College, Iowa; Ph.D., 
Colorado State University. 

TORRES, PAUL DELMAS, Professor of Accounting. B.S.C., Spring Hill College; 
M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama. C.P.A. 

TORREY, GEORGE SICILY, Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Director of 
Food Science and Technology. B.S., M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin. 

TOWNLEY, JAMES AIRD, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. B.S., M.A., 
Universiry of Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, Louisiana State University. 

TRACY, GEORGIA GARBER, Curriculum Librarian, Librarian I, Educational Media 
and Technology. A.B., Baldwin-Wallace; B.S. in L.S., Western Reserve. 

TRACY, WARREN FRANCIS, Professor of Library Science. A.B., Earlham College; 
B.S. in L.S., Western Reserve University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

TUCKER, FORREST DALE, Professor of Speech Communication. B. A., University of 
Wichita; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University. 

TUCKER, HERMOLEE THOMAS, Education Coordinator, Medical Technology. 
B.S., Loyola University. 

TUCKER, SAMUEL, Associate Professor of Social Work. B.A., Goshen College; 
M.S.W., doctoral study, Wayne State University. 

TUGGLE, LYNETTE CALCOTE, Assistant Professor of Family Life Services. B.S., 
M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; doctoral study, University of Illinois. 

TULEY, ROBERT JOSEPH, Associate Professor of Music and Coordinator of Elemen- 
tary Music Education. B.M.Ed., M.A.Ed., Murray State University; Ed.D., 
University of Illinois. 

TWISS, DOROTHY GLEASON, Instructor of English. B. A., B.S.Ed., Mississippi Col- 
lege; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

van ALLER, ROBERT THOMAS, Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of 
Chemistry. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Alabama. 

VAN WINGEN, JOHN RICHARD, Assistant Professor of Political Science. B.A., 
Purdue University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

VREELAND, RICHARD CRAWFORD, Professor of Marketing. B.A., Rollins Col- 
lege; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Florida. 

WALDOFF, STANLEY, Professor of Music. B.S., M.S., Juilliard School of Music; 
Ed.D., Columbia University. 

WALES, ROBERT WARE, Associate Professor of Geography. B.S., M.S., Oregon 
State University; Ph.D., University of Kansas. 

WALLACE, JOHN EDMUND, Associate Professor of History, Gulf Coast. B.A., 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

WALLS. GARY L., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. B.A., University of Kansas; 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Utah. 



376/Faculty 

WALT, MARY ANN, Associate Director of Learning Resources, Teaching-Learning 
Resources Center, and Assistant Professor of Library Science. B.S., Delta State 
University; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi. 

WALTERS, BILLY WAYNE, Instructor of Computer Science and Statistics. B.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., University of Arizona. 

WALTERS, EDWARD OTIS, Administrative Assistant to Dean, College of Education 
and Psychology, and Instructor of Research and Foundations. B.S., M.S., Jackson 
State University; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi. 

WALTMAN, JEROLD LLOYD, Assistant Professor of Political Science. B.A., Loui- 
siana Tech University; M.A., University of Denver; Ph.D., Indiana University. 

WARD, HARRY CALVIN, JR., Honors Associate Professor of Art. B. A., University 
of Southern Mississippi; M. A., East Tennessee State University. 

WARREN, AMELIA TYNES, Education Coordinator, Medical Technology. B.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi. 

WEARE, JANE ANN, Associate Professor of Adult Education. B.S., Harding College; 
M.A., Ed.S., Ed.D., University of Arkansas. 

WEATHERFORD, MARTHA PENTECOST, Instructor of English. B.A., Cumberland 
University; M.A., University of Alabama. 

WEATHERFORD, SIDNEY EDWARD LEE, Director of Bureau of Institutional 
Research and Professor of Educational Administration. B.S., M.A., University of 
Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., University of Florida. 

WEBB, CHARLES FIRMIN, Director of USM-Safety Center and Assistant Professor of 
Health and Safety Education. B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; doc- 
toral study, University of Georgia. 

WEBSTER, PORTER GRIGSBY, Professor of Mathematics. B.A., Georgetown Col- 
lege; M.S., Ph.D., Auburn University. 

WELSH, BERNARD HOWARD, Evening Coordinator and Associate Professor of 
English, Natchez. B.S., Livingston University; M.A., Ph.D., Auburn University. 

WERTZ, DAVID LEE, Chairman of Department of Chemistry and Professor of 
Chemistry. B.S., Arkansas State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Arkansas. 

WESLEY, ANDREA LOTT, Assistant Professor of Psychology. B.A., M.A., Texas 
Woman's University; Ph.D., Florida State University. 

WEST, BEN MARSHALL, Associate Professor of Finance. B.S., United States Military 
Academy; M.S., University of Colorado; J.D., University of Mississippi. 

WHEAT, EDWARD McKINLEY, Assistant Professor of Political Science. B. A., M. A., 
University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara. 

WHEELER, EDDY LEE, Instructor of Journalism. B.S., M.S., East Texas State 
University. 

WHITE, BYRON WALLACE, Major, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science. 
B.A., Pfeiffer College; M.A., Boston University. 

WHITESELL, FRANK COOK, Associate Professor of Economics. B. A., M. A., Univer- 
sity of South Carolina; Ph.D., Tulane University. 

WICKER, RALPH T., Lecturer in Speech and Hearing Sciences. A.B., University of 
Mississippi; M.D., University of Mississippi Medical School. 

WIEMAN, BARBARA LOUISE, Assistant Professor of Music. B.M.Ed., Central Col- 
lege (Missouri); M.A., Missouri University. 

WIGGINS, ROBERT GENE, Associate Professor of Journalism. B.S., M.S., University 
of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Southern Illinois University. 






Faculty/377 

WILDER, SUSAN ECKLES, Director of Richard G. Cox Library and Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Library Science, Gulf Coast. B.A., Louisiana Tech University; M.S., 
Louisiana State University. 

WILDMAN, GARY CECIL, Dean of College of Science and Technology and Professor 
of Polymer Science. A.B., Thiel College; Ph.D., Duke University. 

WILGUS, VIRGINIA ROBERTA RAYNER, Assistant Professor of Institution Ad- 
ministration. A.B., Northwestern State College; M.A., University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

WILKES, CHARLES NEWTON, Assistant Professor of Recreation. B.S., North- 
western State College; M.Ed., Tulane University; Ed.D., Northwestern State 
University. 

WILLIAMS, D.C., JR., Director of Bureau of Business Research and Professor of 
Economics. B.S., Southeast